3

After having built a binary search tree BST<Tkey,TValue> which consists of BSTNode<Tkey,TValue> nodes I am trying to implement the IEnumerable interface for it.

This is the how I construct the BSTNodeEnumrator<Tkey,TValue>:

public class BSTNodeEnumerator<TKey, TValue> : IEnumerator<BSTNode<TKey, TValue>> where TKey : IComparable<TKey>
{
    private Stack<BSTNode<TKey, TValue>> _stack;

    public BSTNodeEnumerator(BSTNode<TKey, TValue> root)
    {
        _stack = new Stack<BSTNode<TKey, TValue>>();
        _current = null;
        _root = root;
    }

    // ... rest of the implementation
}

I pass in root node and _current is the result of the enumeration. I am also trying to use a stack for this as I do not keep track of the parent node as in AVL BST.

Now I want the enumerator to traverse the tree in order + in a non recursive manner. That should result in a sorted enumeration as well due to the properties of a bst, which is great as that's exactly what I want to achieve.

The non-recursive algorithm for in order traversal in pseudo-code as in this wikipedia article

    iterativeInorder(node)
  s ← empty stack
  while (not s.isEmpty() or node ≠ null)
    if (node ≠ null)
      s.push(node)
      node ← node.left
    else
      node ← s.pop()
      visit(node)
      node ← node.right

We can transform the algorithm into this c# code:

public BSTNode<Tkey,TValue> Next() 
{
   while (_stack.Count > 0 || _current != null) 
    {
         if (_current != null)
         {
          _stack.Push(_current);
          _current = _current.left;
         }
         else
         {
          _current = _stack.Pop();
          BSTNode<Tkey,TValue> result = _current;
          _current = _current.Right;
         }
    }
    return result;
}

But that is not the required bool MoveNext() implementation as I have to return a bool. True if I did set _current to an appropriate node, false if I am at the end.

How should I go about implementing public bool MoveNext() ? The main thing that I can't wrap my head around is that If I want to transform BSTNode<Tkey,TValue> Next() into bool MoveNext() I have to return true instead of simply visiting the node BSTNode<Tkey,TValue> result = _current; and only after that set _current = _current.Right; which I obviously can't do.

4
  • 1
    Why not just use HashSet or Dictionary? Jun 29, 2016 at 16:59
  • 1
    Do you need to make your own IEnumerator? why not just have your GetEnumerator function just return your implmentation but do a yield return _current; on the BSTNode<Tkey,TValue> result = _current; line. I will post a implmentation as an answer. Jun 29, 2016 at 17:03
  • @MatthewWhited - For sure I could simply use what is already in .Net, I am simply trying to learn. I am also fighting with AVL binary trees and skiplists as of now just for the sake of it. I am sure that's understandable. I mean .Net didn't just come from the sky.
    – pijemcolu
    Jun 29, 2016 at 17:04
  • 1
    Read the @ScottChamberlain comment. Iterator methods and yield statements are specifically made for non trivial enumerators.
    – Ivan Stoev
    Jun 29, 2016 at 17:06

2 Answers 2

5

Honestly, for a non trival enumerator like this it is better to just use the tools built in to .NET. It can automaticly convert the code you wrote in to a enumerator with only very minor tweaks by just returning IEnumerator<BSTNode<Tkey,TValue>> and using the yield return keyword.

class BSTNode<TKey, TValue> : IEnumerable<BSTNode<TKey, TValue>>
     where TKey : IComparable<TKey>
{
    public IEnumerator<BSTNode<TKey, TValue>> GetEnumerator()
    {
        var stack = new Stack<BSTNode<TKey, TValue>>();
        var current = this;
        while (stack.Count > 0 || current != null)
        {
            if (current != null)
            {
                stack.Push(current);
                current = current.Left;
            }
            else
            {
                current = stack.Pop();
                yield return current;
                current = current.Right;
            }
        }
    }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return GetEnumerator();
    }

    public BSTNode<TKey, TValue> Left { get; set; }

    public BSTNode<TKey, TValue> Right { get; set; }

    public TKey Key { get; set; }

    public TValue Value { get; set; }
}

If you are curious, here is the compiler generated code for the IEnumerator class it made behind the scenes

[CompilerGenerated]
  private sealed class <GetEnumerator>d__0 : IEnumerator<BSTNode<TKey, TValue>>, IDisposable, IEnumerator
  {
    private int <>1__state;
    private BSTNode<TKey, TValue> <>2__current;
    public BSTNode<TKey, TValue> <>4__this;
    private Stack<BSTNode<TKey, TValue>> <stack>5__1;
    private BSTNode<TKey, TValue> <current>5__2;

    BSTNode<TKey, TValue> IEnumerator<BSTNode<TKey, TValue>>.Current
    {
      [DebuggerHidden] get
      {
        return this.<>2__current;
      }
    }

    object IEnumerator.Current
    {
      [DebuggerHidden] get
      {
        return (object) this.<>2__current;
      }
    }

    [DebuggerHidden]
    public <GetEnumerator>d__0(int <>1__state)
    {
      base.\u002Ector();
      this.<>1__state = param0;
    }

    [DebuggerHidden]
    void IDisposable.Dispose()
    {
    }

    bool IEnumerator.MoveNext()
    {
      switch (this.<>1__state)
      {
        case 0:
          this.<>1__state = -1;
          this.<stack>5__1 = new Stack<BSTNode<TKey, TValue>>();
          this.<current>5__2 = (BSTNode<TKey, TValue>) null;
          goto label_8;
        case 1:
          this.<>1__state = -1;
          this.<current>5__2 = this.<current>5__2.Right;
          break;
        default:
          return false;
      }
label_7:
label_8:
      if (this.<stack>5__1.Count <= 0 && this.<current>5__2 == null)
        return false;
      if (this.<current>5__2 != null)
      {
        this.<stack>5__1.Push(this.<current>5__2);
        this.<current>5__2 = this.<current>5__2.Left;
        goto label_7;
      }
      else
      {
        this.<current>5__2 = this.<stack>5__1.Pop();
        this.<>2__current = this.<current>5__2;
        this.<>1__state = 1;
        return true;
      }
    }

    [DebuggerHidden]
    void IEnumerator.Reset()
    {
      throw new NotSupportedException();
    }
  }
2
  • I see, yield return basically retains the current state of the enumeration, making my life much easier.
    – pijemcolu
    Jun 29, 2016 at 17:24
  • @pijemcolu here is the msdn page for it if you would like to learn more. Other cool tricks you can do with yield, if you have a try/finally in your code, if the caller disposes of the IEnumerator<T> the code in the finally block will get executed if it was waiting on a yield return inside the try block. Jun 29, 2016 at 17:28
2

The caller is looping over the enumeration (probably in a foreach-loop). Therefore you can abort your loop each time you want to return a result. A problem arises, because _current = _current.Right; must be executed after the result has been determined. Therefore I am introducing a new variable _result.

private BSTNode<TKey, TValue> _result;

bool IEnumerator.MoveNext()
{
    while (_stack.Count > 0 || _current != null)
    {
        if (_current != null)
        {
            _stack.Push(_current);
            _current = _current.left;
        }
        else
        {
            _current = _stack.Pop();
            _result = _current;
            _current = _current.Right;
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

BSTNode<TKey, TValue> IEnumerator<BSTNode<TKey, TValue>>.Current
{
    get { return _result; }
}

Note that looping over an enumeration consists of first calling MoveNext() and testing the Boolean result. Then using the value returned by Current if true was returned.

2
  • Ah, thats the way to do it. I was trying to figure out the long way, I did not think of adding a result variable. Jun 29, 2016 at 17:52
  • Maybe _current should better be named _cursor or _temp or something and _result should be turned into _current, because it is the backing field of the property Current. Jun 29, 2016 at 17:56

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.