10

Objective: return a value from a function in the units (or any trivial modification) requested by the caller.

Background:

I am running Python 2.7 on a Raspberry Pi 3, and use the function distance() to get the distance a rotary encoder has turned. I need this distance in different units depending on where the function is called. How then, should this be written pythonically (i.e. short, and easily maintained).

First Attempt:

My first attempt was to use a unit of meters in the function, and have a long elif tree to select the right units to return in.

def distance(units='m'):
    my_distance = read_encoder()

    if units == 'm':
        return my_distance * 1.000
    elif units == 'km':
        return my_distance / 1000.
    elif units == 'cm':
        return my_distance * 10.00
    elif units == 'yd':
        return my_distance * 1.094
    else:
        return -1

The nice thing about this approach is that it has a way to recognize a unit that isn't available.

Second Attempt:

My second attempt was to create a dictionary to contain various multipliers.

def distance(units='m'):
    multiplier = {
        'm': 1.000,
        'km': 0.001,
        'cm': 10.00
        'yd': 1.094
    }

    try:
        return read_encoder() * mulitplier[units]
    except KeyError:
        return -1

Here, unrecognized units are caught with a KeyError.

Relevance:

I know of existing libraries like Pint, but am looking for a solution to this programming problem. When you have a function in Python, and you need to make slight modifications to the output in a reusable way. I have other functions such as speed() that use 'm/s' as a base unit, and need a similar units argument. From my experience, a well-structured program does not involve a paragraph of elif branches before every return statement. In this case, if I wanted to change how I calculate the units, I would have to carefully grep through my code, and make sure I change how the units are calculated at every instance. A proper solution would only require changing the calculation once.

This is possibly too broad, but it is a pattern I keep running into.

3
  • 1
    Personally I would go with the second attempt, though if I intended to use it a lot the C# dev inside of me would say make an extension method .convertTo('ms') for example. Then you could do encoderReading.convertTo('m') and I think that syntax looks really nice. Jun 29, 2016 at 18:50
  • So you know all your values are powers of 10 and you also know integers are faster than strings, so you can further optimize it by mapping static values of multiplier into dynamically set ones by using map and lambda.
    – dmitryro
    Jun 29, 2016 at 18:52
  • Unfortunately, my actual implementation has non-SI units (i.e. yards, miles) also. Everyone wants data displayed in their unit-of-choice. I'll update my question to reflect that. Jun 29, 2016 at 18:55

3 Answers 3

6

How about, using a decorator:

def read_encoder():
    return 10

multiplier = {
    'm': 1.000,
    'km': 0.001,
    'cm': 10.00,
    'yd': 1.094,
}

def multiply(fn):
    def deco(units):
        return multiplier.get(units, -1) * fn(units)
    return deco

@multiply
def distance(units='m'):  
    my_distance = read_encoder()
    return my_distance

print distance("m")
print distance("yd")
print distance("feet")

output:

10.0
10.94
-10

or, as a more generic wrapper that goes around any unit-less function:

multiplier = {
    'm': 1.000,
    'km': 0.001,
    'cm': 10.00,
    'yd': 1.094,
}

def multiply(fn):
    def deco(units, *args, **kwds):
        return multiplier.get(units, -1) * fn(*args, **kwds)
    return deco


@multiply
def read_encoder(var):
    #I've added a variable to the function just to show that
    #it can be passed through from the decorator
    return 10 * var

print read_encoder("m", 1)
print read_encoder("yd", 2)
print read_encoder("feet", 3)

output:

 10.0
 21.88
 -30

The bit about raise a KeyError vs -1 is a question of taste. Personally, I'd return * 1 if not found (if the receiver didn't care). Or throw a KeyError. The -1 isn't obviously useful.

Last iteration, making the unit parameter optional:

def multiply(fn):
    def deco(*args, **kwds):
        #pick up the unit, if given
        #but don't pass it on to read_encoder
        units = kwds.pop("units", "m")

        return multiplier.get(units, -1) * fn(*args, **kwds)
    return deco


@multiply
def read_encoder(var):
    return 10 * var

print read_encoder(1, units="yd")
print read_encoder(2)
print read_encoder(3, units="feet")


10.94
20.0  
-30
5

The dictionary lookup is good, but don't return a sentinel value to signal an error; just raise an appropriate exception. It could be as simple (though opaque) as letting the KeyError in your lookup propagate. A better solution, though, is to raise a custom exception:

class UnknownUnitError(ValueError):
    pass

def distance(unit='m'):
    multiplier = {
        'm': 1.000,
        'km': 0.001,
        'cm': 10.00
    }

    try:
        unit = multiplier[unit]
    except KeyError:
        # Include the problematic unit in the exception
        raise UnknownUnitError(unit)

    return read_encoder() * unit
1
  • 1
    While its fine in simple, brief answers, I want to add that generally, when defining an empty class like this, you should not use pass, but use a doc string explaining the class instead.
    – Keozon
    Jun 29, 2016 at 23:19
4

For your example it could be:

class DistanceUnits():
    """
    Enum class for indicating measurement units and conversions between them.
    Holds all related logic.
    """
    M = 'm'
    KM = 'km'
    CM = 'cm'


def distance(units=DistanceUnits.M):
    multiplier = {
        DistanceUnits.M: 1.000,
        DistanceUnits.KM: 0.001,
        DistanceUnits.CM: 10.00
    }
    return read_encoder() * mulitplier[units] if units in multiplier else -1

But, it can be reasonable to move multipliers outside of distance function and make it part of DistanceUnits.

UPD: there are a lot of different ways of 'how to ..' and all of them depends on you needs, but there is one main principle DRY. Even lots of elifs can be good enough (creating dictionary instance consume some ram on each function call..) if you don't forget do not repeat youself.

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