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I am trying to program a microchip in C. Right now my I'm working to update a line on an LCD screen but it doesnt work correctly. Can anyone shed some light on this?

float slope = 0.0626;
char *mystring;
int8_t    LCDline1[20];

void myfunction(){
    sprintf(*mystring, "%ld", (long)(slope * 10000));
    memcpy(LCDline1, *mystring, strlen(*mystring)+1);
}

When I run compile code I get the following three errors.

calibrate.c:60:5: warning: passing argument 1 of 'sprintf' makes pointer from integer without a cast. note: expected 'char *' but argument is of type 'char'

calibrate.c:61:5: warning: passing argument 1 of 'strlen' makes pointer from integer without a cast. note: expected 'const char *' but argument is of type 'char'

calibrate.c:61:5: warning: passing argument 2 of 'memcpy' makes pointer from integer without a cast. note: expected 'const void *' but argument is of type 'char'

Im not sure what I am doing wrong, I am using the following definitions for my starting point

void *memcpy(void *str1, const void *str2, size_t n)

size_t strlen(const char *str)

char *p = "String";

11

mystring is already a pointer. *mystring de-references it to give the first character. You want to just pass in mystring.

You must also allocation some memory for mystring, either statically or dynamically using malloc.

float slope = 0.0626;
char* mystring;
/* char mystring[50]; */ // or just do this, as Sahu and John suggested
int8_t    LCDline1[20];

void myfunction(){
    mystring = (char*)malloc(mystring_size); // set this to any size
    sprintf(mystring, "%ld", (long)(slope * 10000));
    memcpy(LCDline1, mystring, strlen(mystring)+1);
}

NB whenever you are allocating memory for the string, make sure to allocate one more than the string's length, to store the zero-delimiter character (strlen and many other functions need this)

  • What I need is a string that can be any size, because the value of slope can have anywhere from 3 to 8 digits of precesion. I was using stackoverflow.com/questions/8732325/how-to-declare-strings-in-c for my declaration. How do I declare a pointer which I can change the contents of? – Bob Jun 29 '16 at 20:46
  • @Bob, you can make it easier for you by using char mystring[50]; – R Sahu Jun 29 '16 at 20:47
  • That's the point of dynamic allocation - you can use malloc to allocate whatever size you want (within machine / OS limits); also don't forget to allocate one extra character space to store the zero delimiter character – user3235832 Jun 29 '16 at 20:48
  • Why is it that you dont need to declare that sprintf is writing the value to the target of the pointer mystring? Wouldn't the way you have it write the value of slope*1000 to the stored memory address of mystring? – Bob Jun 29 '16 at 20:57
  • 1
    @willywonkadailyblah: In the first comment, the OP claimed that the value of slope can have anywhere from 3 to 8 digits of precision; I'm just taking him at his word. Of course, if you want to cover the max number of decimal digits that can be represented in a 32 bit integral type plus the sign. then yes, you'd need an 11- or 12-element array to store it. – John Bode Jun 29 '16 at 21:09
2

You are incorrectly using pointers. A "string" is defined as an array of characters, and so when you write char *mystring, you are declaring a pointer to a character array (or a string).

Now, if you dereference mystring using *mystring in your code, you are getting the first element of that array, which is just a character. As the warnings say, those functions accept char* parameters, not char.

So, just pass in the pointer, without dereferencing:

void myfunction(){
    sprintf(mystring, "%ld", (long)(slope * 10000));
    memcpy(LCDline1, mystring, strlen(mystring)+1);
}
  • I am tying to understand pointers better, taking the sprintf function you wrote, wouldnt that write the value of slope*1000 into the pointer of mystring, rather than its target? – Bob Jun 29 '16 at 20:48
  • @Bob: No, sprintf assumes that pointer is the starting address of a buffer, and will write the resulting string to that buffer. – John Bode Jun 29 '16 at 21:03
0
Char *c;

This can be starting address of array to store characters but,

c //is the pointer to array
*c // will give starting character of array

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