147

ASP.NET Core support a new configuration system as seen here: https://docs.asp.net/en/latest/fundamentals/configuration.html

Is this model also supported in .NET Core console applications?

If not what is alternate to the previous app.config and ConfigurationManager model?

11 Answers 11

77

You can use this code snippet. It includes Configuration and DI.

public class Program
{
    public static ILoggerFactory LoggerFactory;
    public static IConfigurationRoot Configuration;

    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.OutputEncoding = Encoding.UTF8;

        string environment = Environment.GetEnvironmentVariable("ASPNETCORE_ENVIRONMENT");

        if (String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(environment))
            throw new ArgumentNullException("Environment not found in ASPNETCORE_ENVIRONMENT");

        Console.WriteLine("Environment: {0}", environment);

        var services = new ServiceCollection();

        // Set up configuration sources.
        var builder = new ConfigurationBuilder()
            .SetBasePath(Path.Combine(AppContext.BaseDirectory))
            .AddJsonFile("appsettings.json", optional: true);
        if (environment == "Development")
        {

            builder
                .AddJsonFile(
                    Path.Combine(AppContext.BaseDirectory, string.Format("..{0}..{0}..{0}", Path.DirectorySeparatorChar), $"appsettings.{environment}.json"),
                    optional: true
                );
        }
        else
        {
            builder
                .AddJsonFile($"appsettings.{environment}.json", optional: false);
        }

        Configuration = builder.Build();

        LoggerFactory = new LoggerFactory()
            .AddConsole(Configuration.GetSection("Logging"))
            .AddDebug();

        services
            .AddEntityFrameworkNpgsql()
            .AddDbContext<FmDataContext>(o => o.UseNpgsql(connectionString), ServiceLifetime.Transient);

        services.AddTransient<IPackageFileService, PackageFileServiceImpl>();

        var serviceProvider = services.BuildServiceProvider();

        var packageFileService = serviceProvider.GetRequiredService<IPackageFileService>();

        ............
    }
}

Oh, and don't forget to add in the project.json

{
  "version": "1.0.0-*",
  "buildOptions": {
    "emitEntryPoint": true,
    "copyToOutput": {
      "includeFiles": [
        "appsettings.json",
        "appsettings.Integration.json",
        "appsettings.Production.json",
        "appsettings.Staging.json"
      ]
    }
  },

  "publishOptions": {
    "copyToOutput": [
      "appsettings.json",
      "appsettings.Integration.json",
      "appsettings.Production.json",
      "appsettings.Staging.json"
    ]
  },
...
}
8
  • 12
    This answer is not ideal. Use Directory.GetCurrentDirectory() instead of AppContext.BaseDirectory. There should be no need for the hack afterwards. – Matyas Feb 9 '17 at 13:55
  • 1
    Or set the "Copy to Output Directory" property to "Copy if newer" in Visual Studio for the JSON files. – BuddhiP May 15 '18 at 6:09
  • For base dir to work in Web, Console and Winforms you can use this approach stackoverflow.com/a/33675039/1818723 – Pawel Cioch Nov 25 '18 at 3:06
  • 2
    There doesn't appear to be a SetBasePath method unless you add Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration.FileExtensions. And no AddJsonFile without Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration.Json – Douglas Gaskell Nov 6 '19 at 22:17
  • 1
    The microservices with its own environment in docker changes the approach the normal application must ne written. It's the reality. – aligin Jan 15 at 19:26
258

For a .NET Core 2.0 console app, I did the following:

  1. Create a new file named appsettings.json at the root of the project (the file name can be anything)
  2. Add my specific settings to that file as json. For example:
{
  "myKey1" :  "my test value 1", 
  "myKey2" :  "my test value 2", 
  "foo" :  "bar" 
}
  1. Configure to copy the file to the output directory whenever the project is built (in VS -> Solution Explorer -> right-click file -> select 'Properties' -> Advanced -> Copy to Output Directory -> select 'Copy Always')

  2. Install the following nuget package in my project:

    • Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration.Json
  3. Add the following to Program.cs (or wherever Main() is located):

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var builder = new ConfigurationBuilder()
            .SetBasePath(Directory.GetCurrentDirectory())
            .AddJsonFile("appsettings.json");
    
        var configuration = builder.Build();
    
        // rest of code...
    }
    
  4. Then read the values using either of the following ways:

    string myKey1 = configuration["myKey1"];
    Console.WriteLine(myKey1);
    
    string foo = configuration.GetSection("foo").Value;
    Console.WriteLine(foo);
    

More info: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/core/fundamentals/configuration?tabs=basicconfiguration#simple-configuration

18
  • 1
    As I noticed Microsoft don't use IConfigurationRoot in their examples, but use IConfiguration. – aligin Dec 18 '17 at 10:56
  • 3
    IConfigurationRoot is still available in .NET Core 2.0. It inherits from IConfiguration but it's considered a derived case of it that's not commonly used. Regardless, the code example has been updated to not include it and avoid any confusion. – Ray Mar 12 '18 at 22:15
  • 11
    2 notes: on point 4, you only need Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration.Json... It will include the other 2 by default. Second: If you want to load a section to an object, it is useful to know: var options = new FooOptions(); ConfigurationBinder.Bind(configuration.GetSection("foo"), options); You will need Microsoft.Extensions.Options.ConfigurationExtensions – Yepeekai Mar 13 '18 at 20:02
  • 1
    public class FooOptions{ public string myKey1 {get; set;} public string myKey2 {get;set;}} – Yepeekai Mar 13 '18 at 20:05
  • 2
    Tools > NuGet Package Manager > Package Manager Console .. .. Install-Package Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration .. Install-Package Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration.FileExtensions .. Install-Package Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration.Json – Manohar Reddy Poreddy Sep 7 '18 at 7:02
23

If you use Microsoft.Extensions.Hosting (version 2.1.0+) to host your console app and asp.net core app, all your configurations are injected with HostBuilder's ConfigureAppConfiguration and ConfigureHostConfiguration methods. Here's the demo about how to add the appsettings.json and environment variables:

    var hostBuilder = new HostBuilder()
        .ConfigureHostConfiguration(config =>
        {
            config.AddEnvironmentVariables();

            if (args != null)
            {
                // enviroment from command line
                // e.g.: dotnet run --environment "Staging"
                config.AddCommandLine(args);
            }
        })
        .ConfigureAppConfiguration((context, builder) =>
        {
            var env = context.HostingEnvironment;
            builder.SetBasePath(AppContext.BaseDirectory)
            .AddJsonFile("appsettings.json", optional: false)
            .AddJsonFile($"appsettings.{env.EnvironmentName}.json", optional: true)
            // Override config by env, using like Logging:Level or Logging__Level
            .AddEnvironmentVariables();

        })
        ... // add others, logging, services
        //;

In order to compile above code, you need to add these packages:

<PackageReference Include="Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration" Version="2.1.0" />
<PackageReference Include="Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration.CommandLine" Version="2.1.0" />
<PackageReference Include="Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration.EnvironmentVariables" Version="2.1.0" />
<PackageReference Include="Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration.Json" Version="2.1.0" />
<PackageReference Include="Microsoft.Extensions.Hosting" Version="2.1.0" />
8
  • How is the environment determined? If I create a profile in launchSettings, it actually sets ASPNETCORE_ENVIRONMENT but then context.HostingEnvironment.EnvironmentName is not being set correctly – Sinaesthetic May 17 '18 at 19:15
  • You should use environment as the key, check this code: github.com/aspnet/Hosting/blob/dev/src/… – Feiyu Zhou May 18 '18 at 3:30
  • @FeiyuZhou that's a dead link – Auspex Oct 22 '19 at 9:05
  • Isn't all of this solution after new HostBuilder() redundant? Doesn't HostBuilder do it all internally? – Auspex Oct 22 '19 at 9:07
  • 1
    @Auspex It depends on how you define your console app. If you need to define custom configurations then you should set like this. Here's the doc for dotnet core 3.0: docs.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/core/fundamentals/host/… – Feiyu Zhou Oct 23 '19 at 8:11
10

I was mistaken. You can use the new ConfigurationBuilder from a netcore console application.

See https://docs.asp.net/en/latest/fundamentals/configuration.html for an example.

However, only aspnet core has dependency injection out of the box so you don't have the ability to have strongly typed configuration settings and automatically inject them using IOptions.

4
  • 9
    This answer is valid, but it should contain the necessary code, thus no upvote. – Matyas Feb 9 '17 at 13:54
  • 4
    All you need is to add package: Microsoft.Extensions.Options and call service.AddOptions(); – Bruno Garcia Nov 6 '17 at 17:48
  • 3
    The entire (very long) linked page seems to be ASP.NET related, with mention of "WebHost" in every example. I got to this SO question after finding the linked page and thinking "ok, that's ASP.NET, what about Console Apps". – mackenir May 1 '19 at 14:21
  • That's a bit odd, @mackenir, because in 3.0 it's all been refactored so that it's all just Host! The only reference to WebHost itself is to point you to the 2.2 documentation. They could have been a little clearer that the ConfigureWebHostDefaults() calls in the examples are optional, and only for Web apps. – Auspex Oct 24 '19 at 9:23
8

On .Net Core 3.1 we just need to do these:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
  var configuration = new ConfigurationBuilder().AddJsonFile("appsettings.json").Build();
}

Using SeriLog will look like:

using Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration;
using Serilog;
using System;


namespace yournamespace
{
    class Program
    {

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var configuration = new ConfigurationBuilder().AddJsonFile("appsettings.json").Build();
            Log.Logger = new LoggerConfiguration().ReadFrom.Configuration(configuration).CreateLogger();

            try
            {
                Log.Information("Starting Program.");
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Log.Fatal(ex, "Program terminated unexpectedly.");
                return;
            }
            finally
            {
                Log.CloseAndFlush();
            }
        }
    }
}

And the Serilog appsetings.json section for generating one file daily will look like:

  "Serilog": {
    "MinimumLevel": {
      "Default": "Information",
      "Override": {
        "Microsoft": "Warning",
        "System": "Warning"
      }
    },
    "Using": [ "Serilog.Sinks.Console", "Serilog.Sinks.File" ],
    "WriteTo": [
      {
        "Name": "File",
        "Args": {
          "path": "C:\\Logs\\Program.json",
          "rollingInterval": "Day",
          "formatter": "Serilog.Formatting.Compact.CompactJsonFormatter, Serilog.Formatting.Compact"
        }
      }
    ]
  }
2
  • after trying all those syntax from all over the web, yours is the one that worked for me, and it's so simple. – GaneshT Jul 4 '20 at 20:42
  • I'm glad it helped you out. – Ernest Jul 5 '20 at 23:18
4

It's something like this, for a dotnet 2.x core console application:

        using Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration;
        using Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection;
        using Microsoft.Extensions.Logging;

        [...]
        var configuration = new ConfigurationBuilder()
            .SetBasePath(Directory.GetCurrentDirectory())
            .AddJsonFile("appsettings.json", optional: false, reloadOnChange: true)
            .AddEnvironmentVariables()
            .Build();
        var serviceProvider = new ServiceCollection()
            .AddLogging(options => options.AddConfiguration(configuration).AddConsole())
            .AddSingleton<IConfiguration>(configuration)
            .AddSingleton<SomeService>()
            .BuildServiceProvider();
        [...]
        await serviceProvider.GetService<SomeService>().Start();

The you could inject ILoggerFactory, IConfiguration in the SomeService.

3

If you use .netcore 3.1 the simplest way use new configuration system to call CreateDefaultBuilder method of static class Host and configure application

public class Program
{
    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Host.CreateDefaultBuilder(args)
            .ConfigureAppConfiguration((context, config) =>
            {
                IHostEnvironment env = context.HostingEnvironment;
                config.AddEnvironmentVariables()
                    // copy configuration files to output directory
                    .AddJsonFile("appsettings.json")
                    // default prefix for environment variables is DOTNET_
                    .AddJsonFile($"appsettings.{env.EnvironmentName}.json", optional: true)
                    .AddCommandLine(args);
            })
            .ConfigureServices(services =>
            {
                services.AddSingleton<IHostedService, MySimpleService>();
            })
            .Build()
            .Run();
    }
}

class MySimpleService : IHostedService
{
    public Task StartAsync(CancellationToken cancellationToken)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("StartAsync");
        return Task.CompletedTask;
    }

    public Task StopAsync(CancellationToken cancellationToken)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("StopAsync");
        return Task.CompletedTask;
    }
}

You need set Copy to Output Directory = 'Copy if newer' for the files appsettings.json and appsettings.{environment}.json Also you can set environment variable {prefix}ENVIRONMENT (default prefix is DOTNET) to allow choose specific configuration parameters.

.csproj file:

<PropertyGroup>
  <OutputType>Exe</OutputType>
  <TargetFramework>netcoreapp3.1</TargetFramework>
  <RootNamespace>ConsoleApplication3</RootNamespace>
  <AssemblyName>ConsoleApplication3</AssemblyName>
</PropertyGroup>

<ItemGroup>
  <PackageReference Include="Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration" Version="3.1.7" />
  <PackageReference Include="Microsoft.Extensions.Hosting" Version="3.1.7" />
</ItemGroup>

<ItemGroup>
  <None Update="appsettings.Development.json">
    <CopyToOutputDirectory>PreserveNewest</CopyToOutputDirectory>
  </None>
  <None Update="appsettings.json">
    <CopyToOutputDirectory>PreserveNewest</CopyToOutputDirectory>
  </None>
</ItemGroup>

more details .NET Generic Host

1
  • oh finally thank you for pointing me to the right direction! It is so important to distinguish ASP.NET.CORE and DOTNET.CORE If using a .NET Core application (not asp web stuff, but console or windows/linux services for microservices) you have to set the debugging environment variables to DOTNET_ENVIRONMENT. Then it will work with context.HostingEnviornment.EnviornmentName. – rogaa Oct 5 '20 at 12:47
1

You can use LiteWare.Configuration library for that. It is very similar to .NET Framework original ConfigurationManager and works for .NET Core/Standard. Code-wise, you'll end up with something like:

string cacheDirectory = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings.GetValue<string>("CacheDirectory");
ulong cacheFileSize = ConfigurationManager.AppSettings.GetValue<ulong>("CacheFileSize");

Disclaimer: I am the author of LiteWare.Configuration.

1

Install these packages:

  • Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration
  • Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration.Binder
  • Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration.EnvironmentVariables
  • Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration.FileExtensions
  • Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration.Json

Code:

static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var environmentName = Environment.GetEnvironmentVariable("ENVIRONMENT");
        Console.WriteLine("ENVIRONMENT: " + environmentName);

        var builder = new ConfigurationBuilder()
           .SetBasePath(Directory.GetCurrentDirectory())
           .AddJsonFile("appsettings.json", false)
           .AddJsonFile($"appsettings.{environmentName}.json", true)
           .AddEnvironmentVariables();

        IConfigurationRoot configuration = builder.Build();
        var mySettingsConfig = configuration.Get<MySettingsConfig>();

        Console.WriteLine("URL: " + mySettingsConfig.Url);
        Console.WriteLine("NAME: " + mySettingsConfig.Name);

        Console.ReadKey();
    }

MySettingsConfig Class:

public class MySettingsConfig
{
    public string Url { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

Your appsettings can be as simple as this: enter image description here

Also, set the appsettings files to Content / Copy if newer: content

0

Just piling on... similar to Feiyu Zhou's post. Here I'm adding the machine name.

public static IWebHostBuilder CreateWebHostBuilder(string[] args) =>
        WebHost.CreateDefaultBuilder(args)
          .ConfigureAppConfiguration((context, builder) =>
          {
            var env = context.HostingEnvironment;
            var hostname = Environment.MachineName;
            builder.AddJsonFile("appsettings.json", optional: false, reloadOnChange: true)
              .AddJsonFile($"appsettings.{env.EnvironmentName}.json", optional: true, reloadOnChange: true)
              .AddJsonFile($"appsettings.{hostname}.json", optional: true, reloadOnChange: true);
            builder.AddEnvironmentVariables();
            if (args != null)
            {
              builder.AddCommandLine(args);
            }
          })
        .UseStartup<Startup>();
  }
0

Other solutions work but not in case that you want inject IConfigurationRoot in other services. I simply did it this way:

Install Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration.Json then

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var serviceProvider = new ServiceCollection()
        .AddSingleton(_ =>
            new ConfigurationBuilder()
                .SetBasePath(Path.Combine(AppContext.BaseDirectory))
                .AddJsonFile("appsettings.json", optional: true)
                .Build())
        .BuildServiceProvider();

     // Rest of code ...
}

and in other services inject it or use

serviceProvider.GetService<IConfigurationRoot>()

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