32
var a = 1;
var b = 2;
var c = a+b;

c will show as 12; but I need 3

How do I do it using jQuery?

1

6 Answers 6

83

Definitely use jQuery

Because the power of jQuery is obviously unparalleled, here is how to do with with 100% jQuery:

var a = 1;
var b = 2;
$("<script>c=+("+a+")+ +("+b+")</script>").appendTo($(document));

Now c will hold your result and you used nothing but jQuery! As you can see jQuery is really great because it does all sorts of things

This also works well because it doesn't matter if a or b are strings!


Not enough jQuery?

var a = 1;
var b = 2;
$("<script id='test'>$('<textarea id=\\'abc\\'>'+("+a+")+ +("+b+")+'</textarea>').appendTo($('body'))</script>").appendTo('body');
var c = $("#abc").val();

This answer was done with 100% jQuery because jQuery is awesome but only use this carefully because it might not work sometimes.


jQuery Arithmetic Plugin

You can also use the revolutionary jQuery Arithmetic Plugin this has solved world peace in over 4294967295 (>> 0 === -1) countries:

var a = 1;
var b = 2;
var c = $.add(a,b);

while this is all great (this is not confirmed), but in jQuery -3.0.1 I have heard you will be able to add numbers this way:

$.number($.one, $.two).add($.number($.three, $.four))

this adds 12 (one + two) to 34 (three + four)

1
  • 1
    This is awesome and hilarious.
    – ARI FISHER
    Jun 11, 2020 at 16:43
38

It looks like you have strings and not numbers, you need parseInt() or parseFloat() (if they may be decimals) here, like this:

var a = "1";
var b = "2";
var c = parseInt(a, 10) + parseInt(b, 10);
//or: var c = parseFloat(a) + parseFloat(b);

You can test the difference here, it's worth noting these are not jQuery but base JavaScript functions, so this isn't dependent on the jQuery library in any way.

3
  • 4
    I had to downvote this, because you should never use parseInt to cast strings to number. Rather, use Number().
    – Ashnur
    Jun 18, 2013 at 14:04
  • 2
    Maybe, just maybe, because of implications like discussed at stackoverflow.com/questions/4090518/…
    – amn
    Apr 15, 2016 at 12:04
  • 8
    Not enough jQuery.
    – Roy Tinker
    Nov 3, 2017 at 22:29
10

Try this -

var c = parseInt(a, 10) + parseInt(b, 10);
2
  • 9
    You should always use a radix on parseInt(), otherwise numbers starting with a 0 will be treated as base 16 by default. Sep 28, 2010 at 10:12
  • 2
    Watch out with this one, it will use "0" as a magic prefix for octal, so: parseInt("010") == 8.
    – Douglas
    Sep 28, 2010 at 10:14
10

Just try this:

var a = 1;
var b = 2;
var c = (+a) + (+b);
alert(c); //or whatever you want
2

This performs the addition of two variables supplied from input variables selected on the basis of ID.

var salary, tds, netSalary;
salary = parseInt($("#txtSalary").val());
$("#txtTds").on('mouseenter focus', function ()
{
    tds = parseInt($("#txtSalary").val() * (0.1));
    $("#txtTds").val(tds);
});
$("#txtNetSalary").on('mouseenter focus', function () {
    netSalary = parseInt($("#txtSalary").val() +("#txtTds").val());
    $("#txtNetSalary").val(netSalary);
});
0
    var a =10;
    var b=10;
    var c=a+b;
    alert(c);

    //in  double case
     var e=10.5;
     var f=10.5;
     alert(e+f);

     //forcelly convert to int
     alert(parseInt(e)+parseInt(f));

     //forcelly convert to float
     alert(parseFloat(a)+parseFloat(b));


Example   :

 https://jsfiddle.net/v0rjek67/6/

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