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I have lines of data being read into an array in perl that looks like this:

aaa bbb    ccc ddd -
aaa bbb ccc ddd    eee -

I am trying to inject quotation marks around specific fields in each line- the secont to last and third to last. I'd like the lines to look like this when I'm done:

aaa bbb    "ccc ddd" -
aaa bbb ccc "ddd    eee" -

I've tried splitting the line into an array and using the @array[-3] notation, but that split gets rid of all the whitespace being used as a delimiter. I think I need to use a backreference with a substitution- something like:

s/(\s+[^\s]*\s+)$/\"$+\"/

Except I can't figure out how to make that match the specific fields I need and skip the last ones. Currently, it's putting the last quotation mark after the newline.

1

Description

\w+\s+\w+(?=\s-)

Replace With: "$0"

Regular expression visualization

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Example

Live Demo

https://regex101.com/r/dO1oU9/1

Sample text

aaa bbb    ccc ddd -
aaa bbb ccc ddd    eee -

After Replacement

aaa bbb    "ccc ddd" -
aaa bbb ccc "ddd    eee" -

Explanation

NODE                     EXPLANATION
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  \w+                      word characters (a-z, A-Z, 0-9, _) (1 or
                           more times (matching the most amount
                           possible))
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  \s+                      whitespace (\n, \r, \t, \f, and " ") (1 or
                           more times (matching the most amount
                           possible))
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  \w+                      word characters (a-z, A-Z, 0-9, _) (1 or
                           more times (matching the most amount
                           possible))
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  (?=                      look ahead to see if there is:
----------------------------------------------------------------------
    \s                       whitespace (\n, \r, \t, \f, and " ")
----------------------------------------------------------------------
    -                        '-'
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  )                        end of look-ahead
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  • Thank you for the answer. I'm really still quite new to regex- I thought I needed to use backreferences to replace something. If I do a like in perl like $var =~ s/\w+\s+\w+(?=\s-)/$0/, will it by default match the whole string? – Basil Jul 1 '16 at 21:56
  • And another question- if I wanted to allow the last column to be anything, not just a dash, would changing it to \w+$ work, like this: $var =~ s/\w+\s+\w+(?=\s+\w+$)/$0/? – Basil Jul 1 '16 at 22:01
  • first question: the lookahead (?=\s-) simply looks ahead to see if the next characters are a space followed by a dash. The look ahead simply looks to see if those are then next characters but it doesn't include them in the capture. Also the search function in perl is just s/...../ in your question the trailing $0/ would be used if you're running a replace. but replacing the entire found string with $0 would yield no changes. – Ro Yo Mi Jul 1 '16 at 22:38
  • Second question: Yes if you changed (?=\s+\w+$) the last column could contain any number of a-z, A-Z, 0-9, and _ characters. The last column would not be included in the match of course, it would simply be tested to see if it exists. – Ro Yo Mi Jul 1 '16 at 22:41
  • I thought in order to use the match, you needed to capture it with backreferences. So $var =~ s/\w+\s+\w+(?=\s+\w+$)/\"$0\"/ would have the effect I'm going for? – Basil Jul 1 '16 at 23:42
1

Demonstrated here: https://regex101.com/r/zD3cP9/2

With the pattern

((?:\w+\s*){2})(\s+-)

executed on

aaa bbb    ccc ddd -
aaa bbb ccc ddd    eee -

would be

aaa bbb    "ccc ddd" -
aaa bbb ccc "ddd    eee" -

This one repeats the first subpattern twice as it looks for a dash to complete it. Useful because it is easily maintainable.

  • Thank you! So if I understand this, the first part (?:\w+\s*){2} is a lookahead looking for a word and then 0 or more spaces twice, and the second part matches whitespace then a dash? – Basil Jul 1 '16 at 22:03
  • 1
    You'll have to be careful with this type of expression because the \s* will allow zero or more spaces... and running that twice is like saying, find a string with 1 or more characters followed by 0 or more spaces, followed by 1 or more characters followed by 0 or more spaces. In other words a two character word like ab could be matched by this expression because it contains zero spaces between the letters a and b and zero spaces after the letter b. This may lead to some unexpected results. – Ro Yo Mi Jul 1 '16 at 22:44

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