229

I am trying to fill none values in a Pandas dataframe with 0's for only some subset of columns.

When I do:

import pandas as pd
df = pd.DataFrame(data={'a':[1,2,3,None],'b':[4,5,None,6],'c':[None,None,7,8]})
print df
df.fillna(value=0, inplace=True)
print df

The output:

     a    b    c
0  1.0  4.0  NaN
1  2.0  5.0  NaN
2  3.0  NaN  7.0
3  NaN  6.0  8.0
     a    b    c
0  1.0  4.0  0.0
1  2.0  5.0  0.0
2  3.0  0.0  7.0
3  0.0  6.0  8.0

It replaces every None with 0's. What I want to do is, only replace Nones in columns a and b, but not c.

What is the best way of doing this?

0

9 Answers 9

357

You can select your desired columns and do it by assignment:

df[['a', 'b']] = df[['a','b']].fillna(value=0)

The resulting output is as expected:

     a    b    c
0  1.0  4.0  NaN
1  2.0  5.0  NaN
2  3.0  0.0  7.0
3  0.0  6.0  8.0
9
  • 3
    Yes, this is exactly what I want! Thank you. Any ways to do this inplace? My original dataframe is pretty big.
    – Sait
    Jun 30, 2016 at 22:10
  • 2
    I don't think there is any performance gain by doing this in place as you're overwriting the orig df anyway
    – EdChum
    Jun 30, 2016 at 22:12
  • 7
    The loc is superfluous here, df[['a', 'b']] = df[['a','b']].fillna(value=0) will still work
    – EdChum
    Jun 30, 2016 at 22:13
  • 3
    @EdChum Doesn't it produce a temporary data frame and hence need more memory to do so? (I am concerned more about memory than time complexity.)
    – Sait
    Jun 30, 2016 at 22:14
  • 8
    For many operations, inplace will still work on a copy. I don't know if it's the case for fillna or not. See this answer from one of the pandas core developers.
    – root
    Jun 30, 2016 at 22:16
159

You can using dict , fillna with different value for different column

df.fillna({'a':0,'b':0})
Out[829]: 
     a    b    c
0  1.0  4.0  NaN
1  2.0  5.0  NaN
2  3.0  0.0  7.0
3  0.0  6.0  8.0

After assign it back

df=df.fillna({'a':0,'b':0})
df
Out[831]: 
     a    b    c
0  1.0  4.0  NaN
1  2.0  5.0  NaN
2  3.0  0.0  7.0
3  0.0  6.0  8.0
5
  • 2
    really cool, Btw for the dict you can use fromkeys if you want, +1 Aug 29, 2018 at 1:14
  • 1
    The answer/example would be clearer if it actually showed different values for the different columns.
    – RufusVS
    Sep 21, 2018 at 18:00
  • @RufusVS that is right , but still try to match the op's expected output
    – BENY
    Sep 21, 2018 at 18:04
  • 3
    This is the better solution that the accepted answer, because it avoids chained indexing issues, e.g. if used with df.fillna({'a':0,'b':0}, inplace=True)
    – Alex
    Apr 6, 2020 at 10:39
  • 1
    How to use methods like ffill or bfill inside a dictionary? Dec 28, 2021 at 18:44
37

You can avoid making a copy of the object using Wen's solution and inplace=True:

df.fillna({'a':0, 'b':0}, inplace=True)
print(df)

Which yields:

     a    b    c
0  1.0  4.0  NaN
1  2.0  5.0  NaN
2  3.0  0.0  7.0
3  0.0  6.0  8.0
1
13

using the top answer produces a warning about making changes to a copy of a df slice. Assuming that you have other columns, a better way to do this is to pass a dictionary:
df.fillna({'A': 'NA', 'B': 'NA'}, inplace=True)

10

This should work and without copywarning

df[['a', 'b']] = df.loc[:,['a', 'b']].fillna(value=0)
0
7

Here's how you can do it all in one line:

df[['a', 'b']].fillna(value=0, inplace=True)

Breakdown: df[['a', 'b']] selects the columns you want to fill NaN values for, value=0 tells it to fill NaNs with zero, and inplace=True will make the changes permanent, without having to make a copy of the object.

1
  • 5
    Somehow this gives SettingWithCopyWarning and the change is not reflected in df.
    – Michael
    Nov 4, 2020 at 15:18
5

Or something like:

df.loc[df['a'].isnull(),'a']=0
df.loc[df['b'].isnull(),'b']=0

and if there is more:

for i in your_list:
    df.loc[df[i].isnull(),i]=0
3

For some odd reason this DID NOT work (using Pandas: '0.25.1')

df[['col1', 'col2']].fillna(value=0, inplace=True)

Another solution:

subset_cols = ['col1','col2']
[df[col].fillna(0, inplace=True) for col in subset_cols]

Example:

df = pd.DataFrame(data={'col1':[1,2,np.nan,], 'col2':[1,np.nan,3], 'col3':[np.nan,2,3]})

output:

   col1  col2  col3
0  1.00  1.00   nan
1  2.00   nan  2.00
2   nan  3.00  3.00

Apply list comp. to fillna values:

subset_cols = ['col1','col2']
[df[col].fillna(0, inplace=True) for col in subset_cols]

Output:

   col1  col2  col3
0  1.00  1.00   nan
1  2.00  0.00  2.00
2  0.00  3.00  3.00
3
  • I think inplace is not good practice, check this and this
    – jezrael
    Dec 4, 2020 at 6:55
  • So the best should be if raise inplace warning and then removed from pandas in my opinion.
    – jezrael
    Dec 4, 2020 at 6:56
  • So easy advice - always avoid inplace and never such problem here ;)
    – jezrael
    Dec 4, 2020 at 6:57
0

Sometimes this syntax wont work:

df[['col1','col2']] = df[['col1','col2']].fillna()

Use the following instead:

df['col1','col2']

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