5

I want to have class scope alias to the vector from an argument.

For exapmale:

class Solution {
private:
     vector<int> b; // I want that &b = a, where a from function solve
     int f(int i) {
          // here I want to use vector<int> a, 
          // not passing it as a function argument every time
     }
public:
     int solve(vector<int>& a) {
          // here I want to do smth like b = a; which works for O(1)
     }
};

Unfortunatelly, I can't just declare vector<int> &b; , because of the error: declaration of reference variable 'b' requires an initializer

Could you please, explain how to do it in C++11/14?

Update: I can't change the declaration of int solve(vector<int>& a), the interface provided from outside.

Update: I've changed the code to the more explicit. Looks like I shouldn't do again because in answers and comments people use original variable names. I'm sorry, don't have much experience with StackOverflow.

6
  • What does "allice" mean? Commented Jul 1, 2016 at 2:24
  • alias, sorry, didn't see typo without glasses.
    – lebed2045
    Commented Jul 1, 2016 at 2:29
  • so what will happen if someone calls f before they called solve ?
    – M.M
    Commented Jul 1, 2016 at 3:42
  • maybe f is to be called purely from within solve. taking from "not passing it as a function argument every time", and considering "I can't change the declaration of int solve(vector<int>& _a), the interface provided from outside" - I gather solve is the entry point and given _a is not available any other way (that has been suggested), f seems to be intended to be used from within solve, or else how could you receive a in f? Commented Jul 1, 2016 at 3:58
  • yes, you're right. Let me change the code .
    – lebed2045
    Commented Jul 1, 2016 at 5:16

1 Answer 1

5

Maybe this?

class Solution {
public:
     vector<int> a;
     int maxCoins(const vector<int>& _a) { // const because copying
          a.assign( _a.begin(), _a.end() );
     }
};

But know that you can also do this if you want a reference to the original vector<int> rather than a copy:

class Solution {
public:
     vector<int> & a;
     int maxCoins(vector<int>& _a) : a( _a ) {}
};

Update

This is probably closest. You cannot re-initialize a reference, but then this is exactly the use-case for pointers.

class Solution {
public:
     vector<int> * a;
     int f(int i) {
         a->size(); // can access indirectly
         (*a)[1]; // element access is slightly trickier
         vector<int> & _a = *a; // or can create a direct ref
         _a.size();
     }
     int solve(vector<int>& _a) {
         a = &_a; // store address to _a. a reference is like any local variable unless doing something funny
     }
};

Update 2 - using no pointers

#include <functional>

class Solution {
public:
     // vector<int> a;
     typedef vector<int> datatype;
     datatype blankref;
     std::reference_wrapper<datatype> a = blankref;
     int f(int i) {
          vector<int> & _a = a;
     }
     int solve(vector<int>& _a) {
          a = std::ref(_a);
     }
};

You can't avoid the fact that references are assign-once. References in a class instance have to be assigned using initializer syntax. To have a re-usable reference, you need to have a newly initialized object each time.

To help us here, thanks to advice in comments, there is std::reference_wrapper<T> type that can hold instances of references. It can be assigned to using std::ref( _a ) repeatedly.

Honestly pointers are not inelegant when used right, imo. It comes down to use case and what you believe you would need. Performance wise this probably won't be as good as with pointers (because of temporary objects being constructed), though no guarantees... it should perform similarly in any case.

9
  • Thanks for the answer! 1) works for O(n) because of assign and I can't change the declaration of solve/maxCoins function. 2) Compiler return the error: only constructors take member initializers
    – lebed2045
    Commented Jul 1, 2016 at 2:35
  • I don't think you can copy a vector<> in O(1). The copy constructor / assignment operations will copy each element individually (what if they're classes?), and otherwise you have std::swap to exchange two vectors' contents. What is your use case, do you need a accessible temporarily within the class (the original value) or do you need a copy to work with? If you just need to access, I'd recommend pointers or an RAII / token object, otherwise you're stuck with O(n) due to how vector is copied. Commented Jul 1, 2016 at 2:39
  • Yes, you're right, I don't really need the other copy of vector, I need reference copy which is in fact alias to the same piece of memory. I understand, how to do it with pointer, however I was looking for more elegant way.
    – lebed2045
    Commented Jul 1, 2016 at 2:41
  • I've changed the question description. Sorry for not clear title.
    – lebed2045
    Commented Jul 1, 2016 at 2:44
  • There is a way to avoid pointers, can show how if you think it'll help, but it involves making a new struct / class just to do it. Worth it? (sometimes) Commented Jul 1, 2016 at 2:45

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