I would like to "declare" what are effectively multiple TEMP tables using the WITH statement. The query I am trying to execute is along the lines of:

WITH table_1 AS (
SELECT GENERATE_SERIES('2012-06-29', '2012-07-03', '1 day'::INTERVAL) AS date
)

WITH table_2 AS (
SELECT GENERATE_SERIES('2012-06-30', '2012-07-13', '1 day'::INTERVAL) AS date
)

SELECT * FROM table_1
WHERE date IN table_2

I've read PostgreSQL documentation and researched into using multiple WITH statements and was unable to find an answer.

  • Try a comma before second with statement any any others after. Not sure about postgres but that's the normal syntax with Oracle and sql server – msheikh25 Jul 1 '16 at 4:10
  • I tried using a comma and later a semicolon and there were still syntax errors: ERROR: syntax error at or near "WITH" for the comma and ERROR: syntax error at or near ";" for the semicolon. – Greg Jul 1 '16 at 4:14
up vote 57 down vote accepted

Per the other comments the second Common Table Expression [CTE] is preceded by a comma not a WITH statement so

WITH cte1 AS (SELECT...)
, cte2 AS (SELECT...)
SELECT *
FROM
    cte1 c1
    INNER JOIN cte2 c2
    ON ........

In terms of your actual query this syntax should work in PostgreSql, Oracle, and sql-server, well the later typically you will proceed WITH with a semicolon (;WTIH), but that is because typically sql-server folks (myself included) don't end previous statements which need to be ended prior to a CTE being defined...

Note however that you had a second syntax issue in regards to your WHERE statement. WHERE date IN table_2 is not valid because you never actually reference a value/column from table_2. I prefer INNER JOIN over IN or Exists so here is a syntax that should work with a JOIN:

WITH table_1 AS (
SELECT GENERATE_SERIES('2012-06-29', '2012-07-03', '1 day'::INTERVAL) AS date
)

, table_2 AS (
SELECT GENERATE_SERIES('2012-06-30', '2012-07-13', '1 day'::INTERVAL) AS date
)

SELECT * 
FROM
     table_1 t1
     INNER JOIN 
     table_2 t2
     ON t1.date = t2.date
;

If you want to keep the way you had it which typically EXISTS would be better than IN but to to use IN you need an actual SELECT statement in your where.

SELECT * 
FROM
     table_1 t1
WHERE t1.date IN (SELECT date FROM table_2);

IN is very problematic when date could potentially be NULL so if you don't want to use a JOIN then I would suggest EXISTS. AS follows:

SELECT * 
FROM
     table_1 t1
WHERE EXISTS (SELECT * FROM table_2 t2 WHERE t2.date = t1.date);
  • Thank you for the in depth explanation, the syntax worked :) – Greg Jul 1 '16 at 4:27
  • glad to help. I can't find the article on not using IN but I would strongly suggest using a JOIN or EXISTS over IN. If a null exists in your result set what happens is you will get every record not just the ones you want. It is weird but it is the way most RDBMs work. try checking a search on it, I know the good answer I saw about that was on this site too... anyway, have a good night – Matt Jul 1 '16 at 4:32
  • you saved me a lot of time man, thank you!!! – Juan Oct 28 '16 at 23:58

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