1

Say I have a constructor and a delegated constructor

SomeClass(const std::string&& _name) : obj_needs_construction(100), name(_name) {}
SomeClass(const std::string& _name) : SomeClass(_name) {}

But both are using the same type, I've seen many solutions but they all seem to operate because they make different types but that won't work in my situation. How can I solve this?

Thanks.

  • const std::string&& is pretty useless. What are you trying to achieve? – Cheers and hth. - Alf Jul 1 '16 at 4:44
  • If I'm just using that string just for the constructor I shouldn't need it anymore? Or will it get optimized away anyway? – Thomas Stiteler Jul 1 '16 at 5:01
1
SomeClass(const std::string& _name) : SomeClass(std::move(_name)) {}
  • This works, but it may not be worth using delegates because it's making my code more confusing which is the opposite of my goal. – Thomas Stiteler Jul 1 '16 at 5:02
  • @ThomasStiteler, that's your call. – R Sahu Jul 1 '16 at 5:07
  • Chosen as answer because it's the answer even though I won't use delegating – Thomas Stiteler Jul 1 '16 at 5:12
3

Replace

SomeClass(const std::string&& _name) : obj_needs_construction(100), name(_name) {}
SomeClass(const std::string& _name) : SomeClass(_name) {}

… with just

SomeClass( std::string const& name )
    : obj_needs_construction( 100 )
    , name_( name )
{}

That's it. It will work nicely for temporaries as actual arguments.

  • My example only included one constructor but I actually have a lot more and to clean up code I am using a delegated constructor, so that's why I'm not just using that. – Thomas Stiteler Jul 1 '16 at 4:49
  • Well, you won't get answers about issues that you don't even mention. – Cheers and hth. - Alf Jul 1 '16 at 5:41

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