15

While using lazy initialisers, is there a chance of having retain cycles?

In a blog post and many other places [unowned self] is seen

class Person {

    var name: String

    lazy var personalizedGreeting: String = {
        [unowned self] in
        return "Hello, \(self.name)!"
        }()

    init(name: String) {
        self.name = name
    }
}

I tried this

class Person {

    var name: String

    lazy var personalizedGreeting: String = {
        //[unowned self] in
        return "Hello, \(self.name)!"
        }()

    init(name: String) {
        print("person init")
        self.name = name
    }

    deinit {
        print("person deinit")
    }
}

Used it like this

//...
let person = Person(name: "name")
print(person.personalizedGreeting)
//..

And found that "person deinit" was logged.

So it seems there are no retain cycles. As per my knowledge when a block captures self and when this block is strongly retained by self, there is a retain cycle. This case seems similar to a retain cycle but actually it is not.

  • 2
    Did you try it? Add a deinit method and check if it is called when you expect the object to be deallocated. Or use the memory debugging tools in Xcode/Instruments. – Martin R Jul 1 '16 at 9:05
  • when you use blocks or closures you can accidentally create strong retain cycles – it is nothing to do with lazy initialisers. – holex Jul 1 '16 at 9:19
  • hello @MartinR deinit was called even without capture list. – BangOperator Jul 1 '16 at 10:24
  • @holex it seems blocks memory management differs when it comes to lazy properties. As pointed in the answer, closures to lazy properties are implicitly noescaping. And this changes the memory management rules for such closures. – BangOperator Jul 1 '16 at 12:14
42

I tried this [...]

lazy var personalizedGreeting: String = { return self.name }()

it seems there are no retain cycles

Correct.

The reason is that the immediately applied closure {}() is considered @noescape. It does not retain the captured self.

For reference: Joe Groff's tweet.

  • This deserves more up-votes because of @noescape – Alec O May 3 '17 at 12:29
  • Another way to think about this is that the compiler can safely decide not to apply ARC for self in the lazy var's closure because the closure could only be invoked by code that still was retaining the class instance anyway (in this example a Person instance). So no need with another level of retain on the instance (aka self). I also liked the @noescape reference in this answer. – WeakPointer Sep 3 '17 at 14:58
3

In this case, you need no capture list as no reference self is pertained after instantiation of personalizedGreeting.

As MartinR writes in his comment, you can easily test out your hypothesis by logging whether a Person object is deinitilized or not when you remove the capture list.

E.g.

class Person {
    var name: String

    lazy var personalizedGreeting: String = {
        _ in
        return "Hello, \(self.name)!"
        }()

    init(name: String) {
        self.name = name
    }

    deinit { print("deinitialized!") }
}

func foo() {
    let p = Person(name: "Foo")
    print(p.personalizedGreeting) // Hello Foo!
}

foo() // deinitialized!

It is apparent that there is no risk of a strong reference cycle in this case, and hence, no need for the capture list of unowned self in the lazy closure. The reason for this is that the lazy closure only only executes once, and only use the return value of the closure to (lazily) instantiate personalizedGreeting, whereas the reference to self does not, in this case, outlive the execution of the closure.

If we were to store a similar closure in a class property of Person, however, we would create a strong reference cycle, as a property of self would keep a strong reference back to self. E.g.:

class Person {
    var name: String

    var personalizedGreeting: (() -> String)?

    init(name: String) {
        self.name = name

        personalizedGreeting = {
            () -> String in return "Hello, \(self.name)!"
        }
    }

    deinit { print("deinitialized!") }
}

func foo() {
    let p = Person(name: "Foo")
}

foo() // ... nothing : strong reference cycle

Hypothesis: lazy instantiating closures automatically captures self as weak (or unowned), by default

As we consider the following example, we realize that this hypothesis is wrong.

/* Test 1: execute lazy instantiation closure */
class Bar {
    var foo: Foo? = nil
}

class Foo {
    let bar = Bar()
    lazy var dummy: String = {
        _ in
        print("executed")
        self.bar.foo = self 
            /* if self is captured as strong, the deinit
               will never be reached, given that this
               closure is executed */
        return "dummy"
    }()

    deinit { print("deinitialized!") }
}

func foo() {
    let f = Foo()
    // Test 1: execute closure
    print(f.dummy) // executed, dummy
}

foo() // ... nothing: strong reference cycle

I.e., f in foo() is not deinitialized, and given this strong reference cycle we can draw the conclusion that self is captured strongly in the instantiating closure of the lazy variable dummy.

We can also see that we never create the strong reference cycle in case we never instantiate dummy, which would support that the at-most-once lazy instantiating closure can be seen as a runtime-scope (much like a never reached if) that is either a) never reached (non-initialized) or b) reached, fully executed and "thrown away" (end of scope).

/* Test 2: don't execute lazy instantiation closure */
class Bar {
    var foo: Foo? = nil
}

class Foo {
    let bar = Bar()
    lazy var dummy: String = {
        _ in
        print("executed")
        self.bar.foo = self
        return "dummy"
    }()

    deinit { print("deinitialized!") }
}

func foo() {
    let p = Foo()
    // Test 2: don't execute closure
    // print(p.dummy)
}

foo() // deinitialized!

For additional reading on strong reference cycles, see e.g.

  • "It is apparent that there is no risk of a strong reference cycle in this case": Well, at least to me this is not apparent. If the lazy property is never accessed the initialization closure would stay forever. Why is it not keeping the instance from deallocating? Is there some magic in lazy initialization closures, always interpreting references to self as weak? – Nikolai Ruhe Jul 1 '16 at 9:39
  • I was referring to apparent by experiment (perhaps appparent was a bad choice of words). Anyway, personalizedGreeting itself is just a simple value type (String), it can't by itself hold a reference to self. The at-most-on-the-fly-executed-once closure used for (possibly) instantiating p...Greeting is not an object itself, so it can't hold references to self. It is only executed once if we're asking for p...Greeting to be instantiated. If we never never access p...Greeting, this non-instantiated value type will be deallocated along with the class object when out of scope. – dfri Jul 1 '16 at 9:53
  • 1
    I agree with what you say but it does not answer the question. In your example, the closure takes a reference to self. If that is a strong reference it would keep the instance alive as long as the closure is not deallocated (which can't happen before the property is initialized). So the only explanation that I can think of is: Closures in lazy property initialization automatically always capture self weakly (or, more likely, unowned). This would totally make sense and explain the observed behavior of the "missing" reference cycle. – Nikolai Ruhe Jul 1 '16 at 10:06
  • @NikolaiRuhe I'll look back into this after lunch when I'm back at the office. My theory that either 1. it is as you describe (weak capturing as per default), or 2. the at-most-once lazy instantiating closure can be seen as a runtime-scope (much like a never reached if) that is either a) never reached (non-initialized) or b) reached, fully executed and "thrown away" (end of scope), where the result of the latter is only the return type of the closure, which in this case is just a value type. – dfri Jul 1 '16 at 10:17
  • I couldn't find documentation backing the auto-weak theory. Also my brief browsing of the swift source code did not reveal a hint. Anyway, further testing seems to support the theory that lazy initializers are normal closures with the exception of self not being considered a strong reference. – Nikolai Ruhe Jul 1 '16 at 10:52

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