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I have the following list of items (order matters):

<A> <B> [ ] [\n] <C> [  ] [   ] [\n\r] <D> <A> [ ] [ xyz ] [ abc ] <X>

I would like to merge text nodes denoted by square brackets:

<A> <B> [ \n] <C> [     \n\r] <D> <A> [  xyz  abc ] <X>

I wrote a for-each loop with flags and prevNode pointers to do the task, but it just doesn't feel right:

  • it's way too much effort for a task that could be orally expressed in 10 seconds;
  • without a comment, it would take some mental effort and time to comprehend the code.

I believe it's what Java 8 Stream API is about: less effort to write code, less effort to read it.

Is there a similar mechanism in Java to process lists?

Update.

Given that there are no ready solution, I have developed a very simple fluent API to solve the task. Reduction now looks just like this:

List<Node> output = ListStream.of(input)
                .continuousRegion(node -> node instanceof TextNode)
                .reduceRegion((a, b) -> new TextNode(a.value + b.value))
                .toArrayList();

It perfectly solves many of the tasks, where you have to operate only on continuous regions inside a list. And I have many of those, preparing XMLs for further data processing.


Algorithm:

public List<Node> reduce(List<Node> list) {
        List<Node> result = new ArrayList<>();

        TextNode prevTextNode = null;
        for (Node node : list) {
            if (node instanceof TextNode) {
                TextNode textNode = (TextNode) node;

                if (prevTextNode == null) {
                    prevTextNode = textNode;
                } else {
                    prevTextNode = new TextNode(prevTextNode.value + textNode.value);
                }
            } else {
                if (prevTextNode != null) {
                    result.add(prevTextNode);
                    prevTextNode = null;
                }

                result.add(node);
            }
        }

        if (prevTextNode != null) {
            result.add(prevTextNode);
        }

        return result;
    }

All code (compilable):

import com.sun.deploy.util.StringUtils;
import org.junit.Test;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;
import java.util.stream.Collectors;

import static org.junit.Assert.assertEquals;

public class ListReductionExample {
    class Node {
        final String value;

        Node(String value) {
            this.value = value;
        }

        @Override
        public String toString() {
            return "<" + value + ">";
        }

        @Override
        public boolean equals(Object o) {
            if (this == o) return true;
            if (!(o instanceof Node)) return false;

            Node node = (Node) o;

            return value != null ? value.equals(node.value) : node.value == null;
        }

        @Override
        public int hashCode() {
            return value != null ? value.hashCode() : 0;
        }
    }

    class TextNode extends Node {
        TextNode(String value) {
            super(value);
        }

        @Override
        public String toString() {
            return "[" + value + "]";
        }

    }

    public List<Node> reduce(List<Node> list) {
        List<Node> result = new ArrayList<>();

        TextNode prevTextNode = null;
        for (Node node : list) {
            if (node instanceof TextNode) {
                TextNode textNode = (TextNode) node;

                if (prevTextNode == null) {
                    prevTextNode = textNode;
                } else {
                    prevTextNode = new TextNode(prevTextNode.value + textNode.value);
                }
            } else {
                if (prevTextNode != null) {
                    result.add(prevTextNode);
                    prevTextNode = null;
                }

                result.add(node);
            }
        }

        if (prevTextNode != null) {
            result.add(prevTextNode);
        }

        return result;
    }

    public void printList(List<Node> list) {
        List<String> listOfStrings = list.stream().map(Node::toString).collect(Collectors.toList());

        System.out.println(StringUtils.join(listOfStrings, " "));
    }

    @Test
    public void test() {
        // <A> <B> [ ] [N] <C> [  ] [   ] [NR] <D> <A> [ ] [ xyz ] [ abc ] <X>
        List<Node> input = new ArrayList<>();
        input.add(new Node("A"));
        input.add(new Node("B"));
        input.add(new TextNode(" "));
        input.add(new TextNode("N"));
        input.add(new Node("C"));
        input.add(new TextNode("  "));
        input.add(new TextNode("   "));
        input.add(new TextNode("NR"));
        input.add(new Node("D"));
        input.add(new Node("A"));
        input.add(new TextNode(" "));
        input.add(new TextNode(" xyz "));
        input.add(new TextNode(" abc "));
        input.add(new Node("X"));

        printList(input);

        // <A> <B> [ N] <C> [     NR] <D> <A> [  xyz  abc ] <X>
        List<Node> expectedOutput = new ArrayList<>();
        expectedOutput.add(new Node("A"));
        expectedOutput.add(new Node("B"));
        expectedOutput.add(new TextNode(" N"));
        expectedOutput.add(new Node("C"));
        expectedOutput.add(new TextNode("     NR"));
        expectedOutput.add(new Node("D"));
        expectedOutput.add(new Node("A"));
        expectedOutput.add(new TextNode("  xyz  abc "));
        expectedOutput.add(new Node("X"));

        printList(expectedOutput);

        assertEquals(expectedOutput, reduce(input));
    }
}
  • 8
    It's hard to understand what you're asking with only the description. If you could provide a minimal reproducible example which shows how it does work with a for-each loop, it would make it a lot easier to help you. – Jon Skeet Jul 1 '16 at 9:04
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    Yes, code please. But from what I gather: You have a list of nodes and want to join subsequent nodes of a certain type (text nodes) into one, i.e. reduce the stream to another stream where consecutive next nodes are joined. – dhke Jul 1 '16 at 9:15
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    Write a formulation of what you want. Then turn that is a fluent API: ListProcessor.handle(list).upto("\n").upto("\n\r").handle((c) -> println(c)); And then implement it as ugly as you need. Momentarily it hard to grasp what you want to achieve. – Joop Eggen Jul 1 '16 at 9:15
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    What kind of list do you have? Terms like “prevNode pointers” in the context of List are irritating me. I have the strong feeling that you are actually talking about a DOM tree or a NodeList from the DOM API. You should be clear in what you are talking about. Maybe this help then. Such a list allows to use a Stream too. – Holger Jul 1 '16 at 9:28
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    @DenisKulagin No, there is no such sort of stuff. Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/34086461/… – glee8e Jul 1 '16 at 10:53
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There is no such feature for reducing only parts of a Stream. All solutions trying to built such feature atop the Stream API turn out to be much more complicated than a loop. What you can do to improve your loop variant, is to get rid of the null value and the associated conditionals. The general logic is as follows:

public static <T> List<T> joinElements(
                          List<T> list, BiPredicate<T,T> p, BinaryOperator<T> join) {

    if(list.isEmpty()) return Collections.emptyList();
    T element=list.get(0);
    int num=list.size();
    if(num==1) return Collections.singletonList(element);
    List<T> result=new ArrayList<>(num);
    for(int ix=1; ix<num; ix++) {
        T next=list.get(ix);
        if(p.test(element, next)) {
            element=join.apply(element, next);
        }
        else {
            result.add(element);
            element=next;
        }
    }
    result.add(element);
    return result;
}

if you suspect the caller to provide non-random access lists (which programmers should avoid), you may use

public static <T> List<T> joinElements(
                          List<T> list, BiPredicate<T,T> p, BinaryOperator<T> join) {

    Iterator<T> it=list.iterator();
    if(!it.hasNext()) return Collections.emptyList();
    T element=it.next();
    if(!it.hasNext()) return Collections.singletonList(element);
    List<T> result=new ArrayList<>();
    do {
        T next=it.next();
        if(p.test(element, next)) {
            element=join.apply(element, next);
        }
        else {
            result.add(element);
            element=next;
        }
    } while(it.hasNext());
    result.add(element);
    return result;
}

This may be use like

List<String> result = joinElements(list,
    (a,b) -> isTextNode(a) && isTextNode(b), (a,b) -> new TextNode(a.value+b.value));

For comparison, a Stream based solution could be using a Collector. Since there is no built-in collector for such a task, we have to define one, which basically does the same as the loop based solution, the functionality only being spread over multiple functions, which are evaluated by the Stream which does the iteration:

List<String> result=list.stream().collect(ArrayList::new,
    (l,n) -> l.add(!l.isEmpty() && isTextNode(l.get(l.size()-1)) && isTextNode(n)?
                new TextNode(l.remove(l.size()-1).value+n.value): n),
    (l1,l2) -> {
        if(!l2.isEmpty() && !l1.isEmpty()
           && isTextNode(l1.get(l1.size()-1)) && isTextNode(l2.get(0))) {
                l2.set(0, new TextNode(l1.remove(l1.size()-1).value+l2.get(0).value));
        }
        l1.addAll(l2);
    });

Decide yourself whether this is an improvement over the loop variant…

  • So much thanks for looking into the problem. Your code is, for the most part, what I wanted but I decided to use fluent API in order to be able to implement different kind of methods, like reduce, map,remove and so on. (See an update in the head post). It's definitely better that for-loop because of (1) boost in readability; (2) being able to cover with tests once and reuse as many times as you want; (3) not mixing business logic with technical stuff (which is bad for reasons #1 and #2). – Denis Kulagin Jul 2 '16 at 8:05
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I have the strong feeling that you are not talking about lists from the Collection API, but about DOM nodes. In that case, you are making unnecessary work. Look at

Node.normalize():

Puts all Text nodes in the full depth of the sub-tree underneath this Node, including attribute nodes, into a "normal" form where only structure (e.g., elements, comments, processing instructions, CDATA sections, and entity references) separates Text nodes, i.e., there are neither adjacent Text nodes nor empty Text nodes.

Having no adjacent Text nodes as result implies joining previously adjacent Text nodes. So all you have to do, is to invoke normalize() on the parant node.

  • That would have done the task, but unfortunatelly I am using JSoup instead. Anyway I am trying to solve more generic problem in here, that's not only about processing XMLs. – Denis Kulagin Jul 1 '16 at 9:42

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