74

I'm on a Mac, running .NET Core 1.0 and Visual Studio Code.

I have a console project and a test project. I have setup launch.json so that I can debug the console project.

How do I set up a launch configuration that launches my unit tests and attaches the debugger?

7 Answers 7

188

If you install the latest software and library, it is super easy to debug:

enter image description here

As you can see from the screenshot, just click "debug test" and debug it!

19
  • 7
    How do you debgu and/or run all tests?
    – gerrard00
    Jul 19, 2016 at 21:34
  • 4
    @gerrard00 I don't know how to debug all tests. To run all tests, dotnet test.
    – Tyler Liu
    Jul 20, 2016 at 1:10
  • 4
    just to add that in your test project's project.json you may want to add this to your buildOptions section. "debugType": "portable". This will solve the problem that "No Symbol loaded for this document"
    – Sul Aga
    Sep 4, 2016 at 21:54
  • 2
    @RyanWalls Frankly speaking I don't know. I am afraid that there isn't very seemless integration for NUnit in VSCode (yet). And that's the reason why I learned xUnit.
    – Tyler Liu
    Nov 24, 2016 at 3:31
  • 3
    I wasn't able to see the Run / Debug Test options until I made my projects part of a solution and added the Test Project to the solution (on linux, fwiw). github.com/OmniSharp/omnisharp-vscode/issues/…
    – l p
    Jun 3, 2020 at 0:12
14

See Tyler Long's answer. The steps below are not required in the newest versions of Visual Studio Code :)


I made a repository to demonstrate.

First off, the only way I could get the debugger to hit the test was to add a file, Program.cs, take control of the entry point from xUnit, and manually add code to test. It's not ideal, but I imagine you aren't going to be doing this very often, and it's easy to flip it back to normal.

Program.cs:

using System;
namespace XUnitDebugging
{
    public class Program
    {
        public static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var test = new TestClass();
            test.PassingTest();
            Console.WriteLine("Enter text...");
            Console.ReadLine();

        }
    }
}

Next, in project.json add the following:

  "buildOptions": {
    "emitEntryPoint": true,
    "debugType": "portable"
  },

project.json:

{
  "version": "1.0.0-*",
  "testRunner": "xunit",
  "buildOptions": {
    "emitEntryPoint": true,
    "debugType": "portable"
  },
  "dependencies": {
    "Microsoft.NETCore.App": {
      "type": "platform",
      "version": "1.0.0"
    },
    "xunit": "2.2.0-beta2-build3300",
    "dotnet-test-xunit": "2.2.0-preview2-build1029"
  },
  "frameworks": {
    "netcoreapp1.0": {
      "dependencies": {
        "Microsoft.NETCore.App": {
          "type": "platform",
          "version": "1.0.0"
        }
      }
    }
  }
}

This will allow you to debug an xUnit unit test project.

3
  • 2
    It works for me. By the way, you don't need to comment/uncomment "testRunner": "xunit" and it just works.
    – Tyler Liu
    Jul 14, 2016 at 9:31
  • 3
    I'll accept this answer since it was correct at the time I posted the question - there was indeed no polished way of debugging unit tests in VSCode 1.2.
    – driis
    Jul 15, 2016 at 18:16
  • Is this available on VSCode for MacOS as well?
    – ataravati
    Nov 17, 2019 at 20:23
12

I was able to run the debugger on an entire xUnit project with the following complicated launch config. I inspected the calls the "debug test" link (in @Tyler Long response above) was making through the C# (Omnisharp) VS Code extension to figure this out. Things to note: 1) you must provide the absolute path to the dotnet program 2) you must provide the absolute path (i.e. you cannot use ~/ or $HOME/) to .nuget/packages folders 3) in the example below, the name of my test project namespace is Tests. Once you have this launch config in place, you can place breakpoints(s), launch the debugger using this config and it should hit all the breakpoints.

{
  "name": "Debug xunit tests",
  "type": "coreclr",
  "request": "launch",
  "preLaunchTask": "build",
  "program": "/usr/local/share/dotnet/dotnet",
  "args": [
    "exec",
    "--runtimeconfig",
    "${workspaceRoot}/AppNameHere/bin/Debug/netcoreapp1.0/AppNameHere.runtimeconfig.json",
    "--depsfile",
    "${workspaceRoot}/AppNameHere/bin/Debug/netcoreapp1.0/AppNameHere.deps.json",
    "--additionalprobingpath",
    "/Users/jdoe/.nuget/packages",
    "/Users/jdoe/.nuget/packages/dotnet-test-xunit/1.0.0-rc2-build10015/lib/netcoreapp1.0/dotnet-test-xunit.dll",
    "${workspaceRoot}/AppNameHere/bin/Debug/netcoreapp1.0/AppNameHere.dll",
    "-namespace",
    "Tests"
  ],
  "cwd": "${workspaceRoot}",
  "stopAtEntry": false
}
3
  • 3
    Thank you, this is great! One minor thing that I did to make this a little easier to share with coworkers is to add a symbolic link to the .nuget directory in the root of the workspace: ln -s ~/.nuget, and then to change /Users/jdoe to ${workspaceRoot} -- It's not ideal, but it's a one-time setup. (Also, remember to ignore .nuget/ in your VCS config!!) Nov 5, 2016 at 13:41
  • 1
    @Brady Holt how were you able to inspect the "debug test" calls? Trying to replicate this but my omnisharp extension is using a different package than the one specified.
    – Archibald
    Jan 26, 2020 at 17:52
  • 1) I had to put AppNameHere.dll param immediately after exec for it to work properly. 2) Instead of symbolic links or hard coded paths, you could put a setting in your user settings file and reference it: ${config:tasks.nugetPath}/dotnet-xunit/2.3.1/lib/netcoreapp2.0/dotnet-xunit.dll 3) I didn't have the dotnet-test-xunit, so I used the path referenced in #2. 4) After all of that, my debug window outputs The program '[10500] dotnet.exe' has exited with code 0 (0x0). immediately and I don't hit any breakpoints. Any ideas?
    – Terry
    Mar 2 at 20:44
10

Tyler's answer of clicking the debug test code lens icons is the easiest way of debugging a single test.

A way of testing all unit tests would be to add while(!Debugger.IsAttached) Thread.Sleep(500); inside the tests. This will make the tests wait until you attach a debugger.

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Threading;
using NUnit.Framework;

namespace SomeNamespace
{
    [TestFixture]
    public class SomeClassTests
    {
        [Test]
        public void ShouldDoTest()
        {
            while(!Debugger.IsAttached) Thread.Sleep(500);
            Assert.That(true, Is.True);
        }

        [Test]
        public void ShouldDoTest2()
        {
            while(!Debugger.IsAttached) Thread.Sleep(500);
            Assert.That(true, Is.True);
        }
    }
}

This then allows you to attach the Visual Studio Code debugger to the running testhost.dll. Simple select .NET Core Attach and then the dotnet testhost.dll.

Debug .NET Core Attach

0
1

You can use C# Dev Kit, and use the command Test: Debug. This will present a range of options including debugging tests at the Cursor, All tests, Failed tests.

0

@Eric Eskildsen, Helped me solve for myself

To be noted I only used Step 4 and selected the csproj I was working on rather than building a solution.

The strange thing is only those CodeLens test link seemed affected. Omnisharp hints and/or inlay hints are working throughout the workspace.

1
  • Thanks—added this to my answer (crediting you). Oct 26, 2022 at 0:56
0

Edit: A quick fix (per Cyrille Belfort):

  1. Ctrl+Shift+P
  2. Search for and select OmniSharp: Select Project
  3. Select the test project
  4. Enter

Original answer: To have OmniSharp detect both projects without having to switch between them, you can create a solution.

  1. Create a solution:

    cd YourProjectRootDirectory
    dotnet new sln --name YourSolutionName
    
  2. Add your projects:

    dotnet sln add .\src\YourProject.csproj
    dotnet sln add .\test\YourProject.Tests.csproj
    
  3. Reload VS Code:

    1. Ctrl+Shift+P
    2. Search for and select Developer: Reload window
    3. Enter
  4. Select the solution:

    1. Ctrl+Shift+P
    2. Search for and select OmniSharp: Select Project
    3. Select your solution
    4. Enter

Before:

A test method with only "0 references" above it

After:

A test method with "0 references | Run Test | Debug Test" above it

Thanks to @lp for the comment suggesting this.

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