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What i'm asking now is, what does the delete and new operator do in C? I asked this question, when I was just simply thinking about how to allocate memory in C++, and I remembered you use the new and delete keyword, (malloc() and free() in C). But when I type in the new and delete keyword in a .c file. It showed up as a keyword. What exactly is the keywords use in C(Not C++).

UsbDriver *ud = malloc(sizeof(UsbDriver));
free(ud);
new // What is this keyword?(C)
delete // What is this keyword?(C)
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2 Answers 2

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There is no new and delete keyword in C. It's just your editor wrongly identifying them as keywords and applying the syntax highlighting.

FWIW, if you have the option to control the syntax highlighting for the editor based on language (file extension, maybe), set it to C, even if it shows as keyword, switch to a better editor.

Just for example, see this online compiler and editor.

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  • It shows up in the question when i type new and delete, they are all blue.. And im preety sure Visual Studio is not wrong here lol.
    – amanuel2
    Jul 1, 2016 at 14:04
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    @Dsafds: "Visual Studio is not wrong here" -- Visual Studio is wrong; or badly configured, or something
    – pmg
    Jul 1, 2016 at 14:06
  • @Dsafds here's a list of all the C keywords, new is not among them programiz.com/c-programming/list-all-keywords-c-language
    – Jacob G
    Jul 1, 2016 at 14:08
  • The reason that must be the case is what Shiro said below. It probably thought it was a C/C++ Editor..... C and C++ Are not the same!!
    – amanuel2
    Jul 1, 2016 at 14:08
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    @Lundin Visual Studio is an IDE for all kinds of languages. Visual C++ is the name of the compiler.
    – Shiro
    Jul 1, 2016 at 14:14
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You are probably using an editor that supports C and C++. Because new and delete are not part of C.

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  • Oh that must be the case
    – amanuel2
    Jul 1, 2016 at 14:06
  • @Dsafds Ironically, SO has the same problem. Look at the code formatting in your question. You tagged this C, yet SO decided to format those two as keywords.
    – Lundin
    Jul 1, 2016 at 14:08
  • Yea, @Lundin noticed that too.
    – amanuel2
    Jul 1, 2016 at 14:12

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