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I want to color my clusters with a color map that I made in the form of a dictionary (i.e. {leaf: color}).

I've tried following https://joernhees.de/blog/2015/08/26/scipy-hierarchical-clustering-and-dendrogram-tutorial/ but the colors get messed up for some reason. The default plot looks good, I just want to assign those colors differently. I saw that there was a link_color_func but when I tried using my color map (D_leaf_color dictionary) I got an error b/c it wasn't a function. I've created D_leaf_color to customize the colors of the leaves associated with particular clusters. In my actual dataset, the colors mean something so I'm steering away from arbitrary color assignments.

I don't want to use color_threshold b/c in my actual data, I have way more clusters and SciPy repeats the colors, hence this question. . .

How can I use my leaf-color dictionary to customize the color of my dendrogram clusters?

I made a GitHub issue https://github.com/scipy/scipy/issues/6346 where I further elaborated on the approach to color the leaves in Interpreting the output of SciPy's hierarchical clustering dendrogram? (maybe found a bug...) but I still can't figure out how to actually either: (i) use dendrogram output to reconstruct my dendrogram with my specified color dictionary or (ii) reformat my D_leaf_color dictionary for the link_color_func parameter.

# Init
import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import seaborn as sns; sns.set()

# Load data
from sklearn.datasets import load_diabetes

# Clustering
from scipy.cluster.hierarchy import dendrogram, fcluster, leaves_list
from scipy.spatial import distance
from fastcluster import linkage # You can use SciPy one too

%matplotlib inline

# Dataset
A_data = load_diabetes().data
DF_diabetes = pd.DataFrame(A_data, columns = ["attr_%d" % j for j in range(A_data.shape[1])])

# Absolute value of correlation matrix, then subtract from 1 for disimilarity
DF_dism = 1 - np.abs(DF_diabetes.corr())

# Compute average linkage
A_dist = distance.squareform(DF_dism.as_matrix())
Z = linkage(A_dist,method="average")

# Color mapping
D_leaf_colors = {"attr_1": "#808080", # Unclustered gray

                 "attr_4": "#B061FF", # Cluster 1 indigo
                 "attr_5": "#B061FF",
                 "attr_2": "#B061FF",
                 "attr_8": "#B061FF",
                 "attr_6": "#B061FF",
                 "attr_7": "#B061FF",

                 "attr_0": "#61ffff", # Cluster 2 cyan
                 "attr_3": "#61ffff",
                 "attr_9": "#61ffff",
                 }

# Dendrogram
# To get this dendrogram coloring below  `color_threshold=0.7`
D = dendrogram(Z=Z, labels=DF_dism.index, color_threshold=None, leaf_font_size=12, leaf_rotation=45, link_color_func=D_leaf_colors)
# TypeError: 'dict' object is not callable

enter image description here

I also tried how do I get the subtrees of dendrogram made by scipy.cluster.hierarchy

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  • I can't tell from your description what you want the resulting dendrogram to look like in general (i.e., for an arbitrary leaf color dictionary). As far as I can tell, it doesn't make sense to specify colors in terms of leaves alone, because you have no guarantee that the leaves you give the same color will be near each other in the dendrogram. The things in the dendrogram that are colored are not leaves; they are the links between clusters. Did you somehow generate your leaf_colors from the clusters? If so, can't you instead generate the linkage colors from the clusters? – BrenBarn Jul 5 '16 at 16:54
  • This is true but the way I made the leaf color dictionary is by using fcluster to get the actual clusters – O.rka Jul 5 '16 at 21:05
  • But can't you instead use similar logic to get the linkages and specify colors in terms of those? You can't get the colors just on the basis of fcluster, because fcluster only returns flat clusters and throws away the information about the lower-level clusters. You need the full linkage structure. – BrenBarn Jul 5 '16 at 21:07
  • From fcluster I get an array of length n where n is the amount of samples I'm clustering. Each index of that array has the cluster number. I iterate through that array and the original labels at the same time to assign the samples to clusters. – O.rka Jul 5 '16 at 21:14
  • 1
    Right, but do you see that the dendrogram includes much more information than that? The dendrogram doesn't just indicate a single flat set of clusters. It shows the complete "history" of when each cluster was merged with each other cluster. Each arch represents the joining of two clusters, so whatever coloring information you give has to provide information about pairs of clusters, not just individual "root" clusters or individual leaf nodes. If you only care about the final clusters, you may not even need to use a dendrogram at all. – BrenBarn Jul 5 '16 at 21:17
11
+100

Here a solution that uses the return matrix Z of linkage() (described early but a little hidden in the docs) and link_color_func:

# see question for code prior to "color mapping"

# Color mapping
dflt_col = "#808080"   # Unclustered gray
D_leaf_colors = {"attr_1": dflt_col,

                 "attr_4": "#B061FF", # Cluster 1 indigo
                 "attr_5": "#B061FF",
                 "attr_2": "#B061FF",
                 "attr_8": "#B061FF",
                 "attr_6": "#B061FF",
                 "attr_7": "#B061FF",

                 "attr_0": "#61ffff", # Cluster 2 cyan
                 "attr_3": "#61ffff",
                 "attr_9": "#61ffff",
                 }

# notes:
# * rows in Z correspond to "inverted U" links that connect clusters
# * rows are ordered by increasing distance
# * if the colors of the connected clusters match, use that color for link
link_cols = {}
for i, i12 in enumerate(Z[:,:2].astype(int)):
  c1, c2 = (link_cols[x] if x > len(Z) else D_leaf_colors["attr_%d"%x]
    for x in i12)
  link_cols[i+1+len(Z)] = c1 if c1 == c2 else dflt_col

# Dendrogram
D = dendrogram(Z=Z, labels=DF_dism.index, color_threshold=None,
  leaf_font_size=12, leaf_rotation=45, link_color_func=lambda x: link_cols[x])

Here the output: dendrogram

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  • 1
    Strange. The x should access only already set keys in link_cols. Can you print Z[:,:2].astype(int)? – Ulrich Stern Jul 5 '16 at 21:18
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    Is it possible the key error is from D_leaf_colors? – Ulrich Stern Jul 5 '16 at 21:20
  • 1
    Let us continue this discussion in chat. – Ulrich Stern Jul 5 '16 at 21:22
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    Do you have a link describing the bug? – Ulrich Stern Jul 6 '16 at 17:04
  • 1
    Your code correctly passes the condensed ("n choose 2") distance matrix to linkage(). See also this answer. – Ulrich Stern Jul 7 '16 at 9:17
5

Two-liner for applying custom colormap to cluster branches:

import matplotlib as mpl
from matplotlib.pyplot import cm
from scipy.cluster import hierarchy

cmap = cm.rainbow(np.linspace(0, 1, 10))
hierarchy.set_link_color_palette([mpl.colors.rgb2hex(rgb[:3]) for rgb in cmap])

You can then replace rainbow by any cmap and change 10 for the number of cluster you want.

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  • It seems the O.rka has issues getting his colors, which he defined in a dictionary into the plot. Maybe you could adapt your minimum working example to show him how this is done. – NOhs Sep 11 '17 at 13:37
  • Oh right, was searching myself how to apply a custom colormap and could not find any easy solution. Hope it helps people searching for that special thing ;) – alelouis Sep 11 '17 at 17:39
-1

I found a hackish solution, and does require to use the color threshold (but I need to use it in order to obtain the same original coloring, otherwise the colors are not the same as presented in the OP), but could lead you to a solution. However, you may not have enough information to know how to set the color palette order.

# Init
import pandas as pd
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import seaborn as sns; sns.set()

# Load data
from sklearn.datasets import load_diabetes

# Clustering
from scipy.cluster.hierarchy import dendrogram, fcluster, leaves_list, set_link_color_palette
from scipy.spatial import distance
from fastcluster import linkage # You can use SciPy one too

%matplotlib inline
# Dataset
A_data = load_diabetes().data
DF_diabetes = pd.DataFrame(A_data, columns = ["attr_%d" % j for j in range(A_data.shape[1])])

# Absolute value of correlation matrix, then subtract from 1 for disimilarity
DF_dism = 1 - np.abs(DF_diabetes.corr())

# Compute average linkage
A_dist = distance.squareform(DF_dism.as_matrix())
Z = linkage(A_dist,method="average")

# Color mapping dict not relevant in this case
# Dendrogram
# To get this dendrogram coloring below  `color_threshold=0.7`
#Change the color palette, I did not include the grey, which is used above the threshold
set_link_color_palette(["#B061FF", "#61ffff"])
D = dendrogram(Z=Z, labels=DF_dism.index, color_threshold=.7, leaf_font_size=12, leaf_rotation=45, 
               above_threshold_color="grey")

The result:

enter image description here

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  • Did you run this answer? link_color_func=getcolor throws a KeyError. – wflynny Jul 5 '16 at 15:08
  • Yes, was just figuring it out. It is corrected. The indices go from 10 to 18. Possibly it corresponds to attribbs 1 to 9, the mapping of the attribs is not correct but it is the solution... – rll Jul 5 '16 at 15:16
  • That's not correct. The indices n + 1 to n + n (10 to 18 here) correspond to the clusters in the linkage matrix Z. – wflynny Jul 5 '16 at 15:26
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    At least I understand better the problem now :) – rll Jul 5 '16 at 15:40

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