While playing with Go code, I found out that map values are not addressable. For example,

package main
import "fmt"

func main(){
    var mymap map[int]string = make(map[int]string)
    mymap[1] = "One"
    var myptr *string = &mymap[1]
    fmt.Println(*myptr)
}

Generates error

mapaddressable.go:7: cannot take the address of mymap[1]

Whereas, the code,

package main
import "fmt"

func main(){
    var mymap map[int]string = make(map[int]string)
    mymap[1] = "One"
    mystring := mymap[1]
    var myptr *string = &mystring
    fmt.Println(*myptr)
}

works perfectly fine.

Why is this so? Why have the Go developers chosen to make certain values not addressable? Is this a drawback or a feature of the language?

Edit: Being from a C++ background, I am not used to this not addressable trend that seems to be prevalent in Go. For example, the following code works just fine:

#include<iostream>
#include<map>
#include<string>
using namespace std;
int main(){
    map<int,string> mymap;
    mymap[1] = "one";
    string *myptr = &mymap[1];
    cout<<*myptr;
}

It would be nice if somebody could point out why the same addressability cannot be achieved (or intentionally wasn't achieved) in Go.

  • 1
    See also stackoverflow.com/questions/20224478/… – nos Jul 3 '16 at 15:30
  • 1
    As top answer says, it's a hashtable that stores values in the buckets. When it rehashes the values move. If you want to get around this, using a pointer as your value type will do it. – twotwotwo Jul 4 '16 at 7:22
  • C++ maps get away with this because they're binary trees that needn't move existing nodes around in RAM to add new ones (but its operations average O(log n), not O(1)). C++ unordered_map is a hashtable, but has to impose certain restrictions on implementations to avoid values moving; stackoverflow.com/a/31113618/2714852 and stackoverflow.com/q/37428119 discuss. – twotwotwo Jul 4 '16 at 7:35
  • I think you mean map is addressable (e.g &m), but map elements are not addressable (e.g &(m[1])), that's different. – Eric Wang Jul 29 at 13:19
up vote 10 down vote accepted

Well I do not know about the internal Go implementation of maps but most likely it is a kind of hash table. So if you take and save the address of one of its entries and afterwards put another bunch of entries into it, your saved address may be invalid. This is due to internal reorganizations of hash tables when the load factor exceeds a certain threshold and the hash table needs to grow.
Therefore I guess it is not allowed to take the address of one of its entries in order to avoid such errors.

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