16

I'm running Xcode 7.3.1. When building my Swift based project, it hangs on "Compiling Swift source files". I've tried various combination of deleting DerivedData, clean, run, restarting Xcode, restarting OS X, none seem to work. Any ideas?

7
  • When compiling any project, or just a specific one? – Carcigenicate Jul 3 '16 at 21:32
  • Just one particular project – Steve Kuo Jul 3 '16 at 21:38
  • Do you have any kind of recursive definitions that the compiler might not be catching? – Carcigenicate Jul 3 '16 at 21:40
  • 4
    If you have any large Array or Dictionary literals, make sure you tell Swift the type and don't make it infer the type from the data. – vacawama Jul 3 '16 at 21:40
  • 4
    While compiling, go into the report navigator (CMD-8) and you should see which particular source file is the bottleneck. Have a look for any complicated lines of code that rely heavily on type inference – e.g complicated array or dictionary literals or complicated functional one-liners. – Hamish Jul 3 '16 at 21:42

13 Answers 13

23

I made a class extend itself. That also causes Swift compiler to get stuck in a loop without error:

class X: X
2
  • 1
    Ohh myy... why this is not cached by the compiler. – Baran Emre Mar 11 '18 at 8:38
  • 1
    Still doesn't catch this. I removed a protocol, and renamed a class, that extended itself now. :S – Peterdk Aug 30 '18 at 23:49
8

Thanks for all commentors' suggestions. I narrowed it down to a map's closure referencing a property that I had removed. Example:

var people: [Person] = ...
let foo = people.map { "\($0.name), \($0.age)" }

where Person looks something like:

protocol Person {
    var name: String { get }
    var age: Int { get }
}

This all works fine. Then I removed age while keeping the closure unchanged. This caused Xcode to become hopelessly confused. Probably related to the Swift's type inference.

4
  • 1
    Wow, this was it. Damn those inferred $0 parameters. They're current implementation sucks! (no type inference getting passed through the tools (Xcode, Appcode, etc.... and apparently even the compiler) – Marchy Aug 24 '16 at 23:00
  • 1
    Not exactly the same, but somewhat related. I just spent two hours tracking down a hanging compile that came down to a map() inside a print() call (e.g., print("something mapped: (something.map { $0.stuff })"). Crazy... – jbm Oct 16 '16 at 16:37
  • 2
    You can read on similar causes on cocoawithlove.com/blog/2016/07/12/type-checker-issues.html – Cœur Dec 29 '16 at 17:21
  • 1
    Sorry, I don't understand... I've seen the auto-complete suggest members of the $0 variable. For instance, in the example above if I type "$0.n" it will suggest $0.name. It can do the type inference of [Person] -> $0: Person -> $0.name, so why can't it detect that $0.age doesn't exist? Is it because it's in a string? – BallpointBen Feb 24 '17 at 19:29
7

Change "Swift Compiler Optimization Level" in Build Settings from "Whole module optimization" to "Single file optimization". It may not be your problem, but it solved mine I was stuck with for half a day. It may just be a temporary bug in the recent Xcode version (8.2.1 was the one I have been using at the time I wrote this).

2
  • Still a bug with Xcode 9.3. Thank you, this saved my evening! – Tamás Sengel May 3 '18 at 17:13
  • Changing Optimization Level to No Optimization helped me! – ChikabuZ May 7 at 7:18
6

Try clean your Project Build Folder

  1. Hold down option key and got to Product -> Clean Build Folder ( where Clean used to be in the menu)
  2. If you are using CocoaPods delete your Workspace file and run Pod Install or Pod Update

I think 2 is probably the cause.

3
  • 1
    1. Clean is not under Editor, but under Product – kentrh Sep 28 '16 at 11:03
  • 1
    THANK YOU! I really do wish Apple would add something like this automatically, like a dev debug mode that runs it before every build. Or just fix whatever the hangup is in the build folder to being with. – Kirkland Dec 20 '16 at 16:03
  • I agree Kirkland, I have needed to do this more frequently since Xcode 8 was released. – UKDataGeek Dec 21 '16 at 22:15
4

I had the same problem. In my case it seems to be a result of applying too many nil coalescing actions. I was building a json item:

json = [ "item1": value1 ?? "",
         "item2": value2 ?? "",
         "item3": value3 ?? "",
         ...
         "item14": value14 ?? "" ]

This wouldn't compile. When I removed all the nil coalescing so that it looked like the following, it compiled fine.

json = [ "item1": value 1,
         "item2": value 2,
         "item3": value 3,
         ...
         "item14": value 14 ]

I did not try to figure out the cutoff point for the number of items before it got stuck.

4

There seems to be various possible causes of extremely long compilation time. Corner or edge cases are everywhere. So the best way is to observe and investigate your own case.

Although being mentioned by others in comments, but steps below still worths more attention:

  1. Run project
  2. Switch to Report Navigator (command + 9), and select current running Build task. See which source file is taking up a lot of compiling time.
  3. Check recent commit history of that source file. Investigate the possible cause.
1
  • Thanks! This was useful to narrow-down the issue (I had a Run Script which was taking too much time). – Mikrasya Mar 8 '20 at 7:23
2

In my case the problem was during JSON parsing. I was sending an optional value in a dictionary parameter during JSON parsing.

1
  • yes, same is happening with me, what did you do to solve it? Please help asap! Thanks a lot. – Mohsin Khubaib Ahmed Feb 9 '17 at 10:16
2

Something I found useful was the post from RoystonP on https://forums.developer.apple.com/thread/115303:

1. Open Activity Monitor.
2. Start your project building.
3. Wait for the the build’s progress to completely stop for several minutes.
4. Locate the Swift processes in Activity Monitor (they should be using nearly 100% CPU) and select one of them.
5. In the menu bar, select “View”, then “Send Signal To Process…”
6. Select “Abort (SIGABRT)” from the drop-down list.
7. Click the “Send” button. This will simulate an assertion failing, so the compiler will print information about what it’s doing and then exit.
8. In Xcode, switch to the Report Navigator (the “speech bubble” button over the left-side pane) and select the build.
9. Scroll down to the now-failed compilation step and click the transcript button (button with five lines, to the right of the “Compile [Filename]” line).
10. Scroll down to see the diagnostic information. It will probably include a list of command-line flags, a few lines saying things like “In pass SimplifyCFG”, and a stack trace.


You might have to repeat step 6 and 7 in order to get it to work.

1
  • This is the only way I could find the error in my project. Thanks – Aswath yesterday
1

Watching the Report Navigator helped me find the problem. In my case, the issue was that I tried to add auto layout constraints to a programmatically added subview of a UITableView in a UITableViewController.

0

xcode seems to have a problem concatenating more than 5 strings. See this: Xcode freezes when trying to execute this in a Swift playground? The given workaround solved my problem

0

In my case XCode stucks on big dictionary literal:

requestParameters = [
                        "asset" : "...",
                        "user" : "...",
                        // about 15 additional keys
                        ]

The problem was fixed after replacing this part by:

var requestParameters = [String : Any]()
requestParameters["asset"] = "..."
requestParameters["user"] = "..."
// about 15 additional keys
0

So I believe that in most cases it's well known dictionary literal type interference problem.

Code like this:

 let params = [
                "title": title, "desc": desc, "velikost": velikost,
                "cena": cena, "vykon": vykon, "telefon": telefon,
                "rokVyroby": rokVyroby, "stkDo": stkDo,
                "zemePuvodu": zemePuvodu, "najetoKilometru": najetoKilometru,
                "stav": stav, "ZnackaId": znackaId,
                "VyrobceId": vyrobceId,
                "category": categoryId, "subCategory": subCategoryId,
                "modely[]": modelId, "prodejNakup": prodejNakup,
                "mena": mena, "isNovy": isNovy, "serviska": serviska,
                "abs": abs, "technicak": technicak,
            ]

Have to be written better always like this:

let params: [String: String] = [
                "title": title, "desc": desc, "velikost": velikost,
                "cena": cena, "vykon": vykon, "telefon": telefon,
                "rokVyroby": rokVyroby, "stkDo": stkDo,
                "zemePuvodu": zemePuvodu, "najetoKilometru": najetoKilometru,
                "stav": stav, "ZnackaId": znackaId,
                "VyrobceId": vyrobceId,
                "category": categoryId, "subCategory": subCategoryId,
                "modely[]": modelId, "prodejNakup": prodejNakup,
                "mena": mena, "isNovy": isNovy, "serviska": serviska,
                "abs": abs, "technicak": technicak,
            ]

But I believe that even shorter literals are issue and to save time by waiting for build it's better to always define type for dictionary literals so compiler don't have to find out by himself, as he obviously struggle. PS: I think apple engineers have some serious personal problems there, they have to hire some people from Jatbrains or maybe even me ;) to focus on important things and not waste time on discussions on how Swift have to be different from others...

0

What I came across the bug is that The compiler is unable to type-check this expression in reasonable time; try breaking up the expression into distinct sub-expressions

I missed a left arrow here.

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