1

I am using a Fortran 90 program that writes a file. The first line of this file is supposed to indicate the number of lines in the remaining file. The file is written by the program when a certain criterion is met and that can't be determined beforehand. Basically, I will know the total number of lines only after the run is over.

I want to do it in the following manner:

1) open the file and write the first line with some text say, "Hello"

2) Write rows in the file as desired and keep a counter for number of rows.

3) Once the run is over and just before closing the file, replace the first line string ("Hello") with the counter.

The problem is in step 3. I don't know how to replace the first line.

Another option that I can think of is to write to 2 files. First, write a file as above without the counter. Once the run is over, close the file and write another file and this time, I know the value of the counter.

I believe there is a way to proceed with the first approach. Can someone please help me with this?

2

Going back on a sequential access file is tricky, because lines can vary in length. And if you change the length of one line, you'd have to move all the stuff behind.

What I recommend is to write your output to a scratch file while counting the number of lines. Then, once you're finished, rewind the scratch file, write the number of lines to your output file, and copy the contents of the scratch file to that output file.

Here's what I did:

program var_file
    implicit none
    character(len=*), parameter :: filename = 'delme.dat'
    integer :: n, io_stat
    character(len=300) :: line

    open(unit=200, status='SCRATCH', action="READWRITE")

    n = 0

    do
        read(*, '(A)') line
        if (len_trim(line) == 0) exit  ! Empty line -> finished
        n = n + 1
        write(200, '(A)') trim(line)
    end do

    rewind(200)

    open(unit=100, file=filename, status="unknown", action="write")
    write(100, '(I0)') n

    do
        read(200, '(A)', iostat=io_stat) line
        if (io_stat /= 0) exit
        write(100, '(A)') trim(line)
    end do

    close(200)
    close(100)

end program var_file
| improve this answer | |
  • Thank you for your detailed reply and the program. This was my backup plan. You saved my time on write a code to rewrite a file. :) – Archak Mittal Jul 4 '16 at 4:42
  • This is the way I would do it. I make no guarantee that there isn't a better one that I don't know about. – chw21 Jul 4 '16 at 4:57
4

Fortran supports three forms of file access - DIRECT, STREAM (F2003+) and SEQUENTIAL. Both DIRECT and STREAM access support being able to rewrite earlier parts of a file, SEQUENTIAL access does not (a rewrite to an earlier record truncates the file at the rewritten record).

With direct access, all the records in the file are the same length. An arbitrary record can be [must be] accessed by any input/output statement by simply specifying the relevant record number in the statement. Note though, that the typical disk format of a direct access file may not match your idea of a file with "lines".

With formatted stream access, the current position in the file can be captured using an INQUIRE statement, and then a later input/output statement can begin data transfer at that position by using a POS specifier. The typical disk format of a formatted stream access file usually matches with what people expect of a text file with lines.

Stream access is likely what you want. Examples for both approaches are shown below.

Direct access:

PROGRAM direct
  IMPLICIT NONE

  INTEGER :: unit
  REAL :: r
  INTEGER :: line

  OPEN( NEWUNIT=unit,  &
      FILE='direct.txt',  &
      STATUS='REPLACE',  &
      ACCESS='DIRECT',  &
      RECL=15,  &      ! The fixed record length.
      FORM='FORMATTED' )

  CALL RANDOM_SEED()

  ! No need to write records in order - we just leave off 
  ! writing the first record until the end.

  line = 0
  DO
    CALL RANDOM_NUMBER(r)
    IF (r < 0.05) EXIT

    line = line + 1
    PRINT "('Writing line ',I0)", line
    ! All the "data" records are offset by one, to allow the 
    ! first record to record the line count.
    WRITE (unit, "('line ',I10)", REC=line+1) line
  END DO

  ! Now update the first record with the number of following "lines".
  WRITE (unit, "(I10)", REC=1) line

  CLOSE(unit)
END PROGRAM direct

Stream access:

PROGRAM stream
  IMPLICIT NONE

  INTEGER :: unit
  REAL :: r
  INTEGER :: line
  INTEGER :: pos

  OPEN( NEWUNIT=unit,  &
      FILE='stream.txt',  &
      STATUS='REPLACE',  &
      ACCESS='STREAM',  &
      POSITION='REWIND',  &
      FORM='FORMATTED' )

  CALL RANDOM_SEED()

  ! Remember where we are.  In this case, the position 
  ! is the first file storage unit in the file, but 
  ! it doesn't have to be.
  INQUIRE(unit, POS=pos)

  ! Leave some space in the file for later overwriting 
  ! with the number of lines.  We'll stick the number 
  ! zero in there for now.
  WRITE (unit, "(I10)") 0

  ! Write out the varying number of lines.
  line = 0
  DO
    CALL RANDOM_NUMBER(r)
    IF (r < 0.05) EXIT

    line = line + 1
    PRINT "('Writing line ',I0)", line
    WRITE (unit, "('line ',I10)") line
  END DO

  ! Now update the space at the start with the number of following "lines".
  WRITE (unit, "(I10)", POS=pos) line

  CLOSE(unit)
END PROGRAM stream
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks the information. The option of "Stream" is the way that I should go. Apparently, my compiler doesn't support Access = stream. – Archak Mittal Jul 4 '16 at 20:11
  • 1
    I missed the Fortran 90 tag. Stream is a Fortran 2003 feature. – IanH Jul 4 '16 at 20:32
  • Many modern Fortran Compilers do now support 2003, including STREAM -- so this is a valuable answer even if it doesn't work in this particular case. May I suggest, though, to make it clearer in the answer itself that this only works for 2003-compliant compilers. – chw21 Jul 5 '16 at 0:55

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