14

In git, what does cat-file stand for in this command?

$ git cat-file <...>

My first thought is "concatenate file" because the Unix command cat stands for "concatenate", but this doesn't correspond to the function of git cat-file.

8
  • It's common to use cat for only one file. Jul 4, 2016 at 4:38
  • @Charlie Fish I know what git cat-file does, I just don't know what it stands for. Jul 4, 2016 at 4:41
  • @DietrichEpp I thought it was commonly used for multiple files to string them together. techonthenet.com/unix/basic/cat.php Jul 4, 2016 at 4:42
  • "One or more". One is probably the most common. Jul 4, 2016 at 4:44
  • 1
    "I'm just learning this stuff" is a great attitude to take, in stark contrast with the earlier comment "this isn't really relevant". We're not actually feeding you irrelevant information to throw you off the track, we're trying to answer your questions. Jul 4, 2016 at 6:09

5 Answers 5

11

While cat does stand for "concatenate", what it actually does is simply display one or multiple files, in order of their appearance in the command line arguments to cat. The common pattern to view the contents of a file on Linux or *nix systems is:

cat <file>

The main difference between cat and Git's cat-file is that it only displays a single file (hence the -file part). Git's cat-file doesn't really stand for "concatenate"; it simply is a reference to the behavior of the cat command.

git-cat-file - Provide content or type and size information for repository objects

Technically, you can use git cat-file to concatenate files, if you use Batch Output mode:

BATCH OUTPUT

If --batch or --batch-check is given, cat-file will read objects from stdin, one per line, and print information about them. By default, the whole line is considered as an object, as if it were fed to git-rev-parse[1].

2
  • What is this "display"? cat does not display anything; it writes data to stdout. If stdout is associated with some human oriented device (eg, a tty), then perhaps you could say the data is "displayed", but that is a big assumption to make. It is extremely common to write pipelines that use git cat-file as a producer, and that use case is (probably) far more common writing data to a terminal. Mar 10, 2022 at 17:58
  • 1
    I'm being, perhaps, overly picky here, but the Linux (and UNIX) 'cat' command does indeed stand for concatenate - e.g., from 'man cat' on Linux: " cat - concatenate files and print on the standard output". If "git cat-file" does refer to the 'cat' command (which very likely is the case), then I think one can safely say that "git cat-file" does indeed mean "concatenate". (Sorry for the pickiness, but this bugs me [slightly] every time I read this answer.)
    – jtc
    Apr 10, 2023 at 16:38
11

to read the content ( or blob ) of a git object

git cat-file -p <SHA1>

to read its type

git cat-file -t <SHA1>
1

The main difference between cat and Git's cat-file is that it only displays a single file (hence the -file part)

A single file, ... or a list of single files.

In the second form, a list of objects (separated by linefeeds) is provided on stdin, and the SHA-1, type, and size of each object is printed on stdout.
The output format can be overridden using the optional <format> argument.

This is important when you consider git cat-file --batch, which prints object information and contents for each object provided on stdin.

See also git cat-files --batch-command with Git 2.36 (Q2 2022).

And With Git 2.34 (Q4 2021), the "ref-filter" machinery that drives the "--format" option of "git for-each-ref"(man) and its friends evolves, to be used in git cat-file --batch(man)".

See commit bff9703 (01 Jul 2021) by Junio C Hamano (gitster).
See commit b9dee07, commit e85fcb3, commit 7121c4d, commit bd0708c, commit 311d0b8 (26 Jul 2021) by ZheNing Hu (adlternative).
(Merged by Junio C Hamano -- gitster -- in commit bda891e, 24 Aug 2021)

ref-filter: add %(rest) atom

Reviewed-by: Jacob Keller
Suggected-by: Jacob Keller
Mentored-by: Christian Couder
Mentored-by: Hariom Verma
Signed-off-by: ZheNing Hu

%(rest) is a atom used for cat-file batch mode, which can split the input lines at the first whitespace boundary, all characters before that whitespace are considered to be the object name; characters after that first run of whitespace (i.e., the "rest" of the line) are output in place of the %(rest) atom.

In order to let "cat-file --batch=%(rest)" use the ref-filter interface, add %(rest) atom for ref-filter.

Introduce the reject_atom() to reject the atom %(rest) for "git for-each-ref"(man), "git branch"(man), "git tag"(man) and git verify-tag".

So both command should return the same result:

git cat-file commit refs/tags/testtag^{} >expected &&
git for-each-ref --format="%(*raw)" refs/tags/testtag 

basic atom: refs/tags/testtag *raw

Same for:

git rev-parse refs/mytrees/first | git cat-file --batch >expected &&
git for-each-ref --format="%(objectname) %(objecttype) %(objectsize)%(raw)" refs/mytrees/first

Note that with Git 2.36 (Q2 2022), "git cat-file --help"(man) is clearer.

See commit 5fb2490, commit 83dc443 (10 Jan 2022), and commit 245b948, commit 9ce6000, commit 57d6a1c, commit b3fe468, commit 485fd2c, commit 5a40417, commit 97fe725, commit fa476be, commit 68c69f9, commit ddf8420 (28 Dec 2021) by Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason (avar).
(Merged by Junio C Hamano -- gitster -- in commit 008028a, 05 Feb 2022)

cat-file: correct and improve usage information

Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason

Change the usage output emitted on "git cat-file"(man) -h to group related options, making it clear to users which options go with which other ones.

The new output is:

Check object existence or emit object contents
    -e                    check if <object> exists
    -p                    pretty-print <object> content

Emit [broken] object attributes
    -t                    show object type (one of 'blob', 'tree', 'commit', 'tag', ...)
    -s                    show object size
    --allow-unknown-type  allow -s and -t to work with broken/corrupt objects

Batch objects requested on stdin (or --batch-all-objects)
    --batch[=<format>]    show full <object> or <rev> contents
    --batch-check[=<format>]
                          like --batch, but don't emit <contents>
    --batch-all-objects   with --batch[-check]: ignores stdin, batches all known objects

Change or optimize batch output
    --buffer              buffer --batch output
    --follow-symlinks     follow in-tree symlinks
    --unordered           do not order objects before emitting them

Emit object (blob or tree) with conversion or filter (stand-alone, or with batch)
    --textconv            run textconv on object's content
    --filters             run filters on object's content
    --path blob|tree      use a <path> for (--textconv | --filters ); Not with 'batch'

The old usage was:

<type> can be one of: blob, tree, commit, tag
    -t                    show object type
    -s                    show object size
    -e                    exit with zero when there's no error
    -p                    pretty-print object's content
    --textconv            for blob objects, run textconv on object's content
    --filters             for blob objects, run filters on object's content
    --batch-all-objects   show all objects with --batch or --batch-check
    --path <blob>         use a specific path for --textconv/--filters
    --allow-unknown-type  allow -s and -t to work with broken/corrupt objects
    --buffer              buffer --batch output
    --batch[=<format>]    show info and content of objects fed from the standard input
    --batch-check[=<format>]
                          show info about objects fed from the standard input
    --follow-symlinks     follow in-tree symlinks (used with --batch or --batch-check)
    --unordered           do not order --batch-all-objects output

While shorter, I think the new one is easier to understand, as e.g. "--allow-unknown-type" is grouped with "-t" and "-s", as it can only be combined with those options.
The same goes for "--buffer", "--unordered" etc.


Still with Git 2.36 (Q2 2022), optimize away strbuf_expand() call with a hardcoded formatting logic specific for the default format in git the --batch and --batch-check options of cat-file".

See commit eb54a33 (15 Mar 2022) by John Cai (john-cai).
(Merged by Junio C Hamano -- gitster -- in commit 889860e, 23 Mar 2022)

cat-file: skip expanding default format

Signed-off-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason
Signed-off-by: John Cai

When format is passed into --batch, --batch-check, --batch-command, the format gets expanded.
When nothing is passed in, the default format is set and the expand_format() gets called.

We can save on these cycles by hardcoding how to print the information when nothing is passed as the format, or when the default format is passed.
There is no need for the fully expanded format with the default.
Since batch_object_write() happens on every object provided in batch mode, we get a nice performance improvement.

git rev-list --all > /tmp/all-obj.txt

git cat-file --batch-check </tmp/all-obj.txt

with HEAD^:

Time (mean ± σ): 57.6 ms ± 1.7 ms [User: 51.5 ms, System: 6.2 ms] 
Range (min … max): 54.6 ms … 64.7 ms 50 runs  

with HEAD:

Time (mean ± σ): 49.8 ms ± 1.7 ms [User: 42.6 ms, System: 7.3 ms] 
Range (min … max): 46.9 ms … 55.9 ms 56 runs  

If nothing is provided as a format argument, or if the default format is passed, skip expanding of the format and print the object info with a default format.

See this discussion.


Another difference between git cat-files and cat: mail-mapping: the ability to map author/committer names and/or E-Mail addresses.

With Git 2.38 (Q3 2022), "git cat-file"(man) has learned an option to use the mailmap when showing commit and tag objects.

See commit ec031da, commit 66a8a95, commit dc88e34, commit e9c1b0e (19 Jul 2022) by Siddharth Asthana (edith007).
(Merged by Junio C Hamano -- gitster -- in commit 87098a0, 03 Aug 2022)

cat-file: add mailmap support

Mentored-by: Christian Couder
Mentored-by: John Cai
Helped-by: Phillip Wood
Helped-by: Johannes Schindelin
Signed-off-by: Siddharth Asthana

git-cat-file(man) is used by tools like GitLab to get commit tag contents that are then displayed to users.
This content which has author, committer or tagger information, could benefit from passing through the mailmap mechanism before being sent or displayed.

This patch adds --[no-]use-mailmap command line option to the git cat-file command.
It also adds --[no-]mailmap option as an alias to --[no-]use-mailmap.

git cat-file now includes in its man page:

--[no-]mailmap

--[no-]use-mailmap

Use mailmap file to map author, committer and tagger names and email addresses to canonical real names and email addresses. See git shortlog.


In that context, Git 2.40 (Q1 2023) adds: 'cat-file' gains mailmap support for its '--batch-check' and '-s' options.

See commit a797c0e, commit 49050a0 (20 Dec 2022) by Siddharth Asthana (edith007).
(Merged by Junio C Hamano -- gitster -- in commit 319c3ab, 05 Jan 2023)

cat-file: add mailmap support to -s option

Mentored-by: Christian Couder
Mentored-by: John Cai
Helped-by: Taylor Blau
Helped-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason
Signed-off-by: Siddharth Asthana

Even though the cat-file command with -s option does not complain when --use-mailmap option is given, the latter option is ignored.
Compute the size of the object after replacing the idents and report it instead.

In order to make -s option honour the mailmap mechanism we have to read the contents of the commit/tag object.

git cat-file now includes in its man page:

<object>. If used with --use-mailmap option, will show the size of updated object after replacing idents using the mailmap mechanism.

And:

cat-file: add mailmap support to --batch-check option

Mentored-by: Christian Couder
Mentored-by: John Cai
Helped-by: Taylor Blau
Helped-by: Ævar Arnfjörð Bjarmason
Signed-off-by: Siddharth Asthana

Even though the cat-file command with --batch-check option does not complain when --use-mailmap option is given, the latter option is ignored.
Compute the size of the object after replacing the idents and report it instead.

In order to make --batch-check option honour the mailmap mechanism we have to read the contents of the commit/tag object.

git cat-file --use-mailmap --batch-all-objects --batch-check --buffer --unordered  

The command git cat-file can now use the mailmap mechanism to replace idents with canonical versions for commit and tag objects.
There are several options like --batch, --batch-check and --batch-command that can be combined with --use-mailmap.
But the documentation for --batch, --batch-check and --batch-command doesn't say so.
This patch fixes that documentation.

git cat-file now includes in its man page:

on stdin. May not be combined with any other options or arguments except --textconv, --filters, or --use-mailmap.

  • When used with --textconv or --filters, the input lines must specify the path, separated by whitespace. See the section BATCH OUTPUT below for details.

  • When used with --use-mailmap, for commit and tag objects, the contents part of the output shows the identities replaced using the mailmap mechanism, while the information part of the output shows the size of the object as if it actually recorded the replacement identities.


With Git 2.43 (Q4 2023), "git cat-file"(man) updates the documentation .

See commit cebfaaa (09 Oct 2023) by Štěpán Němec (stepnem).
(Merged by Junio C Hamano -- gitster -- in commit cc7d718, 18 Oct 2023)

doc/cat-file: make synopsis and description less confusing

Signed-off-by: Štěpán Němec
Acked-by: Jeff King

The DESCRIPTION's "first form" is actually the 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 5th form in SYNOPSIS, the "second form" is the 4th one.

Interestingly, this state of affairs was introduced in 97fe725 (cat-file docs: fix SYNOPSIS and , 2021-12-28, Git v2.36.0-rc0 -- merge listed in batch #1) (cat-file docs: fix SYNOPSIS and "-h" output, 2021-12-28) with the claim of "Now the two will match again." ("the two" being DESCRIPTION and SYNOPSIS)...

The description also suffers from other correctness and clarity issues, e.g., the "first form" paragraph discusses -p, -s and -t, but leaves out -e, which is included in the corresponding SYNOPSIS section; the second paragraph mentions <format>, which doesn't occur in SYNOPSIS at all, and of the three batch options, really only describes the behavior of --batch-check.
Also the mention of "drivers" seems an implementation detail not adding much clarity in a short summary (and isn't expanded upon in the rest of the man page, either).

git cat-file now includes in its man page:

git-cat-file - Provide contents or details of repository objects

git cat-file now includes in its man page:

Output the contents or other properties such as size, type or delta information of one or more objects.

This command can operate in two modes, depending on whether an option from the --batch family is specified.

In non-batch mode, the command provides information on an object named on the command line.

git cat-file now includes in its man page:

In batch mode, arguments are read from standard input.

0

add to @Matoeil answer, You only need to specify 5 characters of your <SHA1>.

$ tree .git/

.git/
├── COMMIT_EDITMSG
├── HEAD
├── config
├── description
├── hooks
│   ├── applypatch-msg.sample
│   ├── commit-msg.sample
│   ├── fsmonitor-watchman.sample
│   ├── post-update.sample
│   ├── pre-applypatch.sample
│   ├── pre-commit.sample
│   ├── pre-push.sample
│   ├── pre-rebase.sample
│   ├── pre-receive.sample
│   ├── prepare-commit-msg.sample
│   └── update.sample
├── index
├── info
│   └── exclude
├── logs
│   ├── HEAD
│   └── refs
│       └── heads
│           ├── master
│           └── testBranch
├── objects
│   ├── 1e
│   │   └── e2a78c0b40dd8e5c6b08e31171a3ce1e8d931b
│   ├── 29
│   │   └── 33b9017f79a27ff5ad3c4e154f67b44ae8482c
│   ├── 4a
│   │   └── 6a376085b9b3b8e6e73d2cdcc5281cf6915c58
│   ├── 4b
│   │   └── 825dc642cb6eb9a060e54bf8d69288fbee4904
│   ├── 7e
│   │   └── 6965a8b2ff07da3e632a24ee024b9d2ec5245d
│   ├── ae
│   │   └── 853f7ece778281c463c1f0c603ef9d47a425b7
│   ├── info
│   └── pack
└── refs
├── heads
│   ├── master
│   └── testBranch
└── tags

17 directories, 28 files

$ git cat-file -t ae853
tree 

$ git cat-file -p ae853
100644 blob 7e6965a8b2ff07da3e632a24ee024b9d2ec5245d    fil1.txt 

here explain very well.

1
  • I believe the number of characters needed is dependent on the number of objects in your repo. Generally in git, you need to specify a number of characters of a SHA to ensure uniqueness, with a minimum of 4 regardless of repo/database size. Dec 17, 2022 at 20:25
0

git cat-file - The Cat(concatenate) command It reads data from the file and outputs the contents.

3
  • According to man git-cat-file, the full answer is not only contents. "git-cat-file - Provide content or type and size information for repository objects" Nov 12, 2022 at 22:02
  • 1
    I'm sorry, I've just started trying to answer questions. Next time I will try to give a more detailed answer. Nov 14, 2022 at 14:27
  • 1
    You can start already by editing this answer to improve it. Nov 14, 2022 at 22:04

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