I'm writing a rock-paper-scissors-like game in JavaScript. I have it somehow working but it's done more like writing out all the cases rather than making it do comparisons. Looks something like this:

var weapons = ["bomb", "knife", "pistol"];


var player = prompt("Choose your weapon: bomb, knife or a pistol?");
console.log("You picked a " + player + ".");

var  = weapons[Math.floor(Math.random() * weapons.length)];
console.log(" picked a " +  + ".");


while (player == ) {
    var player = prompt("You chose " + player + " and he chose " +  + 
    " - the same weapon. Draw is not an option, so " +
    "try again! Pick bomb, knife or pistol.");
    console.log('...');
    var  = weapons[Math.floor(Math.random() * weapons.length)];
    console.log(" picked a " +  + ".")
}

if (player == "bomb" &&  == "knife") 
    console.log( `...`);

else if (player == "bomb" &&  == "pistol")
    console.log(`...`);

else if (player == "knife" &&  == "pistol")
    console.log('...');

else if (player == "knife" &&  == "bomb")
    console.log(`...`);

else if (player == "pistol" &&  == "bomb")
    console.log(`...`);

else if (player == "pistol" &&  == "knife")
    console.log(`...`);

else
    console.log(`...`);

Is there a way to store rules like (bomb > knife && bomb < pistol) into something and then pass it over to if/else for comparisons? Or maybe I shouldn't do it even if it's possible?

  • You could store what each one can beat and compare that to what the other person has for what each person chooses. – Daniel K. Jul 4 '16 at 7:48
  • Well it does seem simple enough but i can't see it. i tried all basic structures and I somehow can't store such things everywhere, maybe except some magic with object properties. Probably just me being retarded though. – p1xel Jul 4 '16 at 7:50
  • You could create something like a truth table and implement it as a 2d array, then search through the array for the player's and computer's chosen "weapons" – Polyov Jul 23 '16 at 14:48

You could use an object with the decisions as tree

decisions = {
    bomb: {
        bomb: function () { },
        knife: function () { },
        pistol: function () { }
    }, knife: {
        bomb: function () { },
        knife: function () { },
        pistol: function () { }
    }, pistol: {
        bomb: function () { },
        knife: function () { },
        pistol: function () { }
    }
};

Access via

decisions[player][computer]()

For three weapons, you basically have eight ways to define which weapon is stronger than which (to be more precise: there are eight irreflexive, connex, antisymmetric relations on the set with three elements). Six of them are transitive, i.e. for any weapons a, b and c, if a > b and b > c holds, then also a > c holds.

These six relations always have a strongest weapon which wins over the other two. Therefore, they would be not interesting for a game like this (if you chose that strongest weapon, you will always win).

So, only for the sake of completeness: these six different relations could be modelled by a strength hash like this:

 strength = { 
   bomb: 3, 
   knife: 1, 
   pistol: 2 
 }

Weapon a will then be said to be stronger than b if strength[a] > strength[b] holds.

There are six ways to assign the numbers 1,2,3 to the three members of the strength hash (the number of permutations of three elements), these correspond to the six transitive relations.

The other two relations cannot be modeled by comparing scores. These are the only that are interesting for your game, since there is no "strongest weapon". They are "circular" in a sense. Each weapon is stronger than precisely one other weapon.

You achieve them by setting either

 strength = {
   bomb: 0,
   knife: 1,
   pistol: 2
 }

or

 strength = {
   bomb: 0,
   knife: 2,
   pistol: 1
 }

and defining weapon a to be stronger than weapon b if and only if

 ( 3 + strength[a] - strength[b] ) % 3 == 1

holds.

Putting it differently. Depending on the 2^3 = 8 ways to answer the following three questions, you get 8 different relations. Two of them are intransitive, and they are both circular, differing only in the orientation of the cycle:

//                     Transitive:            Intransitive:
// pistol > bomb   ?   1  1  1  0  0  0       0  1 
// bomb   > knife  ?   1  0  0  1  1  0       0  1
// knife  > pistol ?   0  1  0  1  0  1       0  1

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