2

As I know, Functor is basically a class that overrides operator (). Now I will have to first instantiate a class, to use the override operator. For example -

class A {
    bool operator()(int a, int b) const {
        return a<b;
    }
}

Now when I want to pass this to sort function, I will first have to instantiate it.

A instance;
sort(a.begin(),a.end(),instance);

The above should be correct implementation as I am passing a function to sort function which it can use for comparison. Why do I have to pass instance() as argument instead of instance.

One more thing: when I pass something like greater(), I am not even instantiating the class!

  • 3
    You don't. Your code is correct, you simply need to make operator() public in A. When you do sort(a.begin(), a.end(), greater()) you are constructing an instance of greater. – Holt Jul 4 '16 at 12:32
  • @Holt: Answers in the answer section please mate. – Lightness Races with Monica Jul 4 '16 at 12:37
4

std::greater is a functional object that is it is a structure that provides the function call operator.

Expression

std::greater<std::string>()

calls the constructor of the structure and creates a temporary object of type std::greater<std::string> for which the function call operator can be called in an algorithm.

Relative to your function object definition

class A {
    bool operator()(int a, int b) const {
        return a<b;
    }
}

to create an instance of the class you should use expression

A()

So you can write either

std::sort( a.begin(), a.end(), A() );

or

A instance;
std::sort( a.begin(), a.end(), instance );

Take into account that the results are equivalent for these code snippets

std::cout << A()( 10, 20 ) << std::endl;

and

A instance;

std::cout << instance( 10, 20 ) << std::endl;
  • So basically , when I do something like this - [](int a,int b) { return a<b; }, it automatically creates a class with () operator overriden and instantiates it for me. And why I don't have to mention a return type in the above code. – Shubham Jain Jul 4 '16 at 12:44
  • 2
    @ShubhamJain Yes lambda expressions are classes with the function call operator that corresponds to the body of lambda expression. – Vlad from Moscow Jul 4 '16 at 12:53
  • 1
    @ShubhamJain As can be seen at en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/lambda lambda expressions doesn't need to specify return type if they contain nothing but a single return statement. (Always(?) legal since c++14 (deduced in the same way as auto)) – Moberg Jul 5 '16 at 7:08
3

Why do I have to pass instance() as argument instead of instance.

You don't.

Either pass instance (the name of the instance), or A() (which is a separate, temporary, instance).

One more thing , when I pass something like greater(), I am not even instantiating the class !

Sure you are. This is a temporary of type greater.


Don't forget to make your operator() be public.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.