2

Even if the shared variable is atomic, it must be modified under the mutex in order to correctly publish the modification to the waiting thread. Any thread that intends to wait on std::condition_variable has to acquire a std::unique_lock, on the same mutex as used to protect the shared variable

http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/thread/condition_variable

I understand that by protecting the std::condition_variable with a mutex we are protected against missing a notify if the waiting thread is not actually waiting. Answered here already: Shared atomic variable is not properly published if it is not modified under mutex

What I would like to know is if it's possible to use the mutex only to protect the std::condition_variable, and some other form of protection for the shared data? If we modify the example given in the other answer, would this work?

std::atomic_bool proceed(false);
std::mutex m;
std::condition_variable cv;

std::thread t([&m,&cv,&proceed]()
{
    {
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> l(m);
        while(!proceed) {
            hardWork();
            cv.wait(l);
        }
    }
});

proceed = true;

{
    std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock(m);
}
cv.notify_one();
t.join();

Or is there something going on with memory ordering or caches that I have missed?


Update


I'm aware that the mutex is normally protecting the shared data as well, using the atomic variable was just an example. The question is not about how to protect the shared data, but if it's necessary to use the same mutex to protect both. Another example using a second mutex:

bool proceed(false);
std::mutex boolMutex;

std::mutex cvMutex;
std::condition_variable cv;
std::unique_lock<std::mutex> l(cvMutex);

void setBool()
{
    std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock(boolMutex);
    proceed = true;
}

bool checkBool()
{
    std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock(boolMutex);
    return proceed;
}

void worker()
{
    while (true)
    {
        cv.wait(l);
        if (checkBool()) {
            // Do work
            return;
        }
    }
}

int main()
{
    std::thread t(worker);
    setBool();

    {
        std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock(cvMutex);
    }
    cv.notify_one();
    t.join();

    return 0;
}
0

The mutex-protected flag must be set, and the condition variable get signalled, while the mutex is still being held:

{
    std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock(m);
    proceed = true;
    cv.notify_one();
}

Furthermore, in this case the proceed flag does not need to be an atomic entity. A simple

bool proceed;

will be sufficient. With access to proceed happening only while holding the associated mutex, making proceed atomic accomplishes absolutely nothing.

atomic entities are for handling exotic concurrency situations that do not involve any mutexes in the first place.

  • 1
    From what I've read previously, it's a good habit to unlock before notifying so that the waiting thread does not wake up to a locked mutex? And why must the flag be set while holding the mutex? If thread t is awake and inside hardWork(), the main thread will try and lock the mutex and simply wait until successful, then notify when thread t is back waiting on cv. – Tim Jul 4 '16 at 13:24
  • That is incorrect. All access to objects used by multiple threads must be protected by mutexes. This includes condition variables. – Sam Varshavchik Jul 4 '16 at 16:05
  • So the code example found here: en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/thread/condition_variable, the discussions here: stackoverflow.com/questions/35775501/… and here stackoverflow.com/questions/17101922/… are incorrect? – Tim Jul 4 '16 at 17:06
  • @SamVarshavchik There's no need to have a locked mutex when you notify a condition variable. You should note that a condition variable is already linked to a mutex. From the man pages: The pthread_cond_broadcast() or pthread_cond_signal() functions may be called by a thread whether or not it currently owns the mutex that threads calling pthread_cond_wait() or pthread_cond_timedwait() have associated with the condition variable during their waits – Zan Lynx Jul 7 '16 at 21:56
  • 1
    @ZanLynx Thank you for clarifying that. Do you have any insight into the original question as well? – Tim Jul 8 '16 at 11:36

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