Edit

  1. Pattern that keep on retrying until the promise resolves (with delay and maxRetries).
  2. Pattern that keeps on retrying until the condition meets on the result (with delay and maxRetries).
  3. A memory efficient dynamic Pattern with unlimited retries (delay provided).

Code for #1. Keeps on retrying until promise resolves (any improvements community for the language etc?)

Promise.retry = function(fn, times, delay) {
    return new Promise(function(resolve, reject){
        var error;
        var attempt = function() {
            if (times == 0) {
                reject(error);
            } else {
                fn().then(resolve)
                    .catch(function(e){
                        times--;
                        error = e;
                        setTimeout(function(){attempt()}, delay);
                    });
            }
        };
        attempt();
    });
};

Use

work.getStatus()
    .then(function(result){ //retry, some glitch in the system
        return Promise.retry(work.unpublish.bind(work, result), 10, 2000);
    })
    .then(function(){console.log('done')})
    .catch(console.error);

Code for #2 keep on retrying until a condition meets on the then result in a reusable way (condition is what will vary).

work.publish()
    .then(function(result){
        return new Promise(function(resolve, reject){
            var intervalId = setInterval(function(){
                work.requestStatus(result).then(function(result2){
                    switch(result2.status) {
                        case "progress": break; //do nothing
                        case "success": clearInterval(intervalId); resolve(result2); break;
                        case "failure": clearInterval(intervalId); reject(result2); break;
                    }
                }).catch(function(error){clearInterval(intervalId); reject(error)});
            }, 1000);
        });
    })
    .then(function(){console.log('done')})
    .catch(console.error);
  • No sure what the setInterval will achieve inside promise, where is it resolving it? – ShuberFu Jul 5 '16 at 23:00
  • @jfriend, what happened to the answer, why it got deleted? – user2727195 Jul 5 '16 at 23:13
  • Don't add "edits" to your question. It makes it hard to follow. Instead, just edit your question. If someone wants to look at the edit history, then they can. – user663031 Jul 6 '16 at 4:08
  • See stackoverflow.com/questions/37993365/retry-a-promise-step/…. – user663031 Jul 6 '16 at 4:09
  • 2
    This looks like an answer. Is there a question? – shoover Apr 25 '17 at 19:18
up vote 22 down vote accepted

Something a bit different ...

Async retries can be achieved by building a .catch() chain, as opposed to the more usual .then() chain.

This approach is :

  • only possible with a specified maximum number of attempts. (The chain must be of finite length),
  • only advisable with a low maximum. (Promise chains consume memory roughly proportional to their length).

Otherwise, use a recursive solution.

First, a utility function to be used as a .catch() callback.

var t = 500;

function rejectDelay(reason) {
    return new Promise(function(resolve, reject) {
        setTimeout(reject.bind(null, reason), t); 
    });
}

Now you can build .catch chains very concisely :

1. Retry until the promise resolves, with delay

var max = 5;
var p = Promise.reject();

for(var i=0; i<max; i++) {
    p = p.catch(attempt).catch(rejectDelay);
}
p = p.then(processResult).catch(errorHandler);

DEMO: https://jsfiddle.net/duL0qjqe/

2. Retry until result meets some condition, without delay

var max = 5;
var p = Promise.reject();

for(var i=0; i<max; i++) {
    p = p.catch(attempt).then(test);
}
p = p.then(processResult).catch(errorHandler);

DEMO: https://jsfiddle.net/duL0qjqe/1/

3. Retry until result meets some condition, with delay

Having got your mind round (1) and (2), a combined test+delay is equally trivial.

var max = 5;
var p = Promise.reject();

for(var i=0; i<max; i++) {
    p = p.catch(attempt).then(test).catch(rejectDelay);
    // Don't be tempted to simplify this to `p.catch(attempt).then(test, rejectDelay)`. Test failures would not be caught.
}
p = p.then(processResult).catch(errorHandler);

test() can be synchronous or asynchronous.

It would also be trivial to add further tests. Simply sandwich a chain of thens between the two catches.

p = p.catch(attempt).then(test1).then(test2).then(test3).catch(rejectDelay);

DEMO: https://jsfiddle.net/duL0qjqe/3/


All versions are designed for attempt to be a promise-returning async function. It could also conceivably return a value, in which case the chain would follow its success path to the next/terminal .then().

  • 1
    When you say, only possible with a specified maximum number of attempts, I can revert to setInterval based method for unlimited and do concatenation of promises within the setInterval method, would be nice to see your example for unlimited tries, if you don't mind. it will be used when I'm sure about the outcome whether resolve or reject but this procedure (publishing) takes too much time at times based on the file size. – user2727195 Jul 6 '16 at 20:26
  • Promise chains consume memory roughly proportional to their length but they are going to be released at the end of settlement? – user2727195 Jul 6 '16 at 20:28
  • I've edited #3 as unlimited retries, and I expect some memory efficient dynamic concatenation/chaining. – user2727195 Jul 6 '16 at 20:32
  • 2
    This whole solution path seems odd to me. Because it might retry up to N times, it pre-creates N objects in case they might be needed. If the actual operation succeeds in the first try, then not only did you create N-1 objects needlessly, but they then have to then be disposed of. It just seems conceptually inefficient and sometimes practically inefficient if N is anything but a small number. It also can't make arbitrary decisions about how many times to retry like a recursively chaining solution can. For example, it wouldn't know how to implement "retry automatically for up to 2 minutes". – jfriend00 Jul 8 '16 at 17:47
  • 2
    @user2727195 - I'm also not sure how the test() function can communicate back the difference between failure with retry to follow or failure with error to be communicated back and all retries aborted. Since a lot of the solutions have this structure p.catch(attempt).catch(rejectDelay);, there is no ability to reject in attempt() to abort further processing. This seems overly simplistic to a real world situation. There are usually failures that indicate a retry is desired and failures that indicate no further retries should be done and in fact this seems to be the case in the OP's code. – jfriend00 Jul 8 '16 at 17:52

You can chain a new promise onto the prior one, thus delaying its eventual resolution until you know the final answer. If the next answer still isn't known, then chain another promise on it and keep chaining checkStatus() to itself until eventually you know the answer and can return the final resolution. That could work like this:

function delay(t) {
    return new Promise(function(resolve) {
        setTimeout(resolve, t);
    });
}

function checkStatus() {
    return work.requestStatus().then(function(result) {
        switch(result.status) {
            case "success":
                return result;      // resolve
            case "failure":
                throw result;       // reject
            case default:
            case "inProgress": //check every second
                return delay(1000).then(checkStatus);
        }
    });
}

work.create()
    .then(work.publish) //remote work submission
    .then(checkStatus)
    .then(function(){console.log("work published"})
    .catch(console.error);

Note, I also avoided creating the promise around your switch statement. Since you're already in a .then() handler, just returning a value is resolve, throwing an exception is reject and returning a promise is chaining a new promise onto the prior one. That covers the three branches of your switch statement without creating a new promise in there. For convenience, I do use a delay() function that is promise based.

FYI, this assumes the work.requestStatus() doesn't need any arguments. If it does need some specific arguments, you can pass those at the point of the function call.


It might also be a good idea to implement some sort of timeout value for how long you will loop waiting for completion so this never goes on forever. You could add the timeout functionality like this:

function delay(t) {
    return new Promise(function(resolve) {
        setTimeout(resolve, t);
    });
}

function checkStatus(timeout) {
    var start = Date.now();

    function check() {
        var now = Date.now();
        if (now - start > timeout) {
            return Promise.reject(new Error("checkStatus() timeout"));
        }
        return work.requestStatus().then(function(result) {
            switch(result.status) {
                case "success":
                    return result;      // resolve
                case "failure":
                    throw result;       // reject
                case default:
                case "inProgress": //check every second
                    return delay(1000).then(check);
            }
        });
    }
    return check;
}

work.create()
    .then(work.publish) //remote work submission
    .then(checkStatus(120 * 1000))
    .then(function(){console.log("work published"})
    .catch(console.error);

I'm not sure exactly what "design pattern" you're looking for. Since you seem to object to the externally declared checkStatus() function, here's an inline version:

work.create()
    .then(work.publish) //remote work submission
    .then(work.requestStatus)
    .then(function() {
        // retry until done
        var timeout = 10 * 1000;
        var start = Date.now();

        function check() {
            var now = Date.now();
            if (now - start > timeout) {
                return Promise.reject(new Error("checkStatus() timeout"));
            }
            return work.requestStatus().then(function(result) {
                switch(result.status) {
                    case "success":
                        return result;      // resolve
                    case "failure":
                        throw result;       // reject
                    case default:
                    case "inProgress": //check every second
                        return delay(1000).then(check);
                }
            });
        }
        return check();
    }).then(function(){console.log("work published"})
    .catch(console.error);

A more reusable retry scheme that could be used in many circumstances would define some reusable external code, but you seem to object to that so I haven't made that version.


Here's one other approach that uses a .retryUntil() method on the Promise.prototype per your request. If you want to tweak implementation details of this, you should be able to modify this general approach:

// fn returns a promise that must be fulfilled with an object
//    with a .status property that is "success" if done.  Any
//    other value for that status means to continue retrying
//  Rejecting the returned promise means to abort processing 
//        and propagate the rejection
// delay is the number of ms to delay before trying again
//     no delay before the first call to the callback
// tries is the max number of times to call the callback before rejecting
Promise.prototype.retryUntil = function(fn, delay, tries) {
    var numTries = 0;
    function check() {
        if (numTries >= tries) {
            throw new Error("retryUntil exceeded max tries");
        }
        ++numTries;
        return fn().then(function(result) {
            if (result.status === "success") {
                return result;          // resolve
            } else {
                return Promise.delay(delay).then(check);
            }
        });
    }
    return this.then(check);
}

if (!Promise.delay) {
    Promise.delay = function(t) {
        return new Promise(function(resolve) {
            setTimeout(resolve, t);
        });
    }
}


work.create()
    .then(work.publish) //remote work submission
    .retryUntil(function() {
        return work.requestStatus().then(function(result) {
            // make this promise reject for failure
            if (result.status === "failure") {
                throw result;
            }
            return result;
        })
    }, 2000, 10).then(function() {
        console.log("work published");
    }).catch(console.error);

I still can't really tell what you want or what about all these approaches is not solving your issue. Since your approaches seem to all be all inline code and not using a resuable helper, here's one of those:

work.create()
    .then(work.publish) //remote work submission
    .then(function() {
        var tries = 0, maxTries = 20;
        function next() {
            if (tries > maxTries) {
                throw new Error("Too many retries in work.requestStatus");
            }
            ++tries;
            return work.requestStatus().then(function(result) {
                switch(result.status) {
                    case "success":
                        return result;
                    case "failure":
                        // if it failed, make this promise reject
                        throw result;
                    default:
                        // for anything else, try again after short delay
                        // chain to the previous promise
                        return Promise.delay(2000).then(next);
                }

            });
        }
        return next();
    }).then(function(){
        console.log("work published")
    }).catch(console.error);
  • I liked the previous implementation, I solved it also somehow but don't like it, and same with your case, I liked your previous implementation which you deleted, and I liked it because of it's inline implementation within the then handler, the purpose is to come up with an elegant design pattern that works with then handler without the need of outsider functions and rather than just solve the issue, can we please rework – user2727195 Jul 5 '16 at 23:24
  • @user2727195 - The previous implementation did not work - that's why I changed it. It did not loop until result found. It just called work.requestStatus() one more time and had no ability to loop. I believe this meets the requirements of your question. If you are looking for something beyond this, then please edit your question to specify what else you are looking for and leave me a comment to tell me you've done so. – jfriend00 Jul 5 '16 at 23:34
  • 1
    @user2727195 - The checkStatus() implementation can be done inline without a separately named function if that is somehow bothering you, but I thought it was a cleaner implementation to break it out as I did because it makes the .then().then().then() chain a lot simpler to follow and see exactly what is going on there. Also, I needed to create a closure for the timeout management and this was a convenient way to do so without introducing any variables at the top scope level. – jfriend00 Jul 5 '16 at 23:38
  • 1
    @user2727195 - This could likely be made more generic. Please edit your question to describe exactly what criteria you are looking for. You vaguely mention "design pattern", but are not very specific about what would actually meet your requirements. – jfriend00 Jul 5 '16 at 23:46
  • 1
    @user2727195 - You can't repeat code indefinitely asynchronously without having some function that you can call repeatedly. That's why check() is defined as a function. It's how you make a body of code that you can repeatedly call asynchronously. – jfriend00 Jul 5 '16 at 23:56

2. Pattern that keeps on retrying until the condition meets on the result (with delay and maxRetries)

This is an nice way to do this with native promises in a recursive way:

const wait = ms => new Promise(r => setTimeout(r, ms));

const retryOperation = (operation, delay, times) => new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
  return operation()
    .then(resolve)
    .catch((reason) => {
      if (times - 1 > 0) {
        return wait(delay)
          .then(retryOperation.bind(null, operation, delay, times - 1))
          .then(resolve)
          .catch(reject);
      }
      return reject(reason);
    });
});

This is how you call it, assuming that func sometimes succeeds and sometimes fails, always returning a string that we can log:

retryOperation(func, 1000, 5)
  .then(console.log)
  .catch(console.log);

Here we're calling retryOperation asking it to retry every second and with max retries = 5.

If you want something simpler without promises, RxJs would help with that: https://github.com/Reactive-Extensions/RxJS/blob/master/doc/api/core/operators/retrywhen.md

work.create()
    .then(work.publish) //remote work submission
    .then(function(result){
        var maxAttempts = 10;
        var handleResult = function(result){
            if(result.status === 'success'){
                return result;
            }
            else if(maxAttempts <= 0 || result.status === 'failure') {
                return Promise.reject(result);
            }
            else {
                maxAttempts -= 1;
                return (new Promise( function(resolve) {
                    setTimeout( function() {
                        resolve(_result);
                    }, 1000);
                })).then(function(){
                    return work.requestStatus().then(handleResult);
                });
            }
        };
        return work.requestStatus().then(handleResult);
    })
    .then(function(){console.log("work published"})
    .catch(console.error);
  • Avoid the promise constructor antipattern! – Bergi Jul 5 '16 at 23:50
  • @Bergi - I can't figure out how to resolve this in a more readable way. Could you please shed some light? Also, would please you scroll to the bottom of this article (github.com/petkaantonov/bluebird/wiki/…), where it talks about setTimeout, and make sure this scenario doesn't fit into the exception? – Hugo Silva Jul 6 '16 at 0:45
  • Have a look at jfriend's answer :-) setTimeout does fit the exception, so use the Promise constructor to get a promise for the delay, but requestStatus does return a promise and using it insde the Promise constructor is the antipattern. – Bergi Jul 6 '16 at 0:49
  • In this case, I think I prefer the so called anti pattern, for it results in code that is more readable and easier to follow. Thanks for pointing it out though, made me acquire some valuable information. – Hugo Silva Jul 6 '16 at 0:58
  • and more likely to break. It's not even simpler if you are accustomed to monads. – Bergi Jul 6 '16 at 1:01

One library can do this easily : promise-retry.

Here are some examples to test it :

const promiseRetry = require('promise-retry');

Expect second attempt to be successful :

it('should retry one time after error', (done) => {
    const options = {
        minTimeout: 10,
        maxTimeout: 100
    };
    promiseRetry((retry, number) => {
        console.log('test2 attempt number', number);
        return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
            if (number === 1) throw new Error('first attempt fails');
            else resolve('second attempt success');
        }).catch(retry);
    }, options).then(res => {
        expect(res).toBe('second attempt success');
        done();
    }).catch(err => {
        fail(err);
    });
});

Expect only one retry :

it('should not retry a second time', (done) => {
    const options = {
        retries: 1,
        minTimeout: 10,
        maxTimeout: 100
    };
    promiseRetry((retry, number) => {
        console.log('test4 attempt number', number);
        return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
            if (number <= 2) throw new Error('attempt ' + number + ' fails');
            else resolve('third attempt success');
        }).catch(retry);
    }, options).then(res => {
        fail('Should never success');
    }).catch(err => {
        expect(err.toString()).toBe('Error: attempt 2 fails');
        done();
    });
});

There are many good solutions mentioned and now with async/await these problems can be solved without much effort.

If you don't mind a recursive approach then this is my solution.

function retry(fn, retries=3, err=null) {
  if (retries === 0) {
    return Promise.reject(err);
  }
  return fn().catch(err => {
      return retry(fn, (retries - 1), err);
    });
}

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