18

This question already has an answer here:

It is known feature of C++ that a const reference extends the life time of the temporary object returned from a function, but is it acceptable to use constant reference to the member of the temporary object returned from the function?

Example:

#include <string>

std::pair<std::string, int> getPair(int n)
{
    return {std::to_string(n), n};
}

int main(int, char*[])
{
    const int x = 123456;
    const auto& str = getPair(x).first;
    printf("%d = %s\n", x, str.c_str());    
    return 0;
}

Output:

123456 = 123456

marked as duplicate by Barry c++ Jul 6 '16 at 16:02

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  • 2
    imho phrases like "...is a well known feature.." are not so nice. They discriminate those who dont know that feature and carries no information whatsoever. Otherwise, interesting question – formerlyknownas_463035818 Jul 6 '16 at 14:31
  • 2
    I am not 100% sure, but I think it's valid as per standard. The lifetime of the temporary should be prolonged as long as the lifetime of its member access (str in this case). That said, you should be just ok by taking return value by copy. RVO will avoid doing extra copies. – Arunmu Jul 6 '16 at 14:34
  • 1
    Highly related: stackoverflow.com/questions/35947296/… – NathanOliver Jul 6 '16 at 15:41
  • I think that answer is out of date compared to the current standard – Smeeheey Jul 6 '16 at 16:21
12

Yes, this code is perfectly acceptable. The rules, according to the standard are ([class.temporary]):

  1. There are two contexts in which temporaries are destroyed at a different point than the end of the fullexpression. The first context is when a default constructor is called to initialize an element of an array. If the constructor has one or more default arguments, the destruction of every temporary created in a default argument is sequenced before the construction of the next array element, if any.

  2. The second context is when a reference is bound to a temporary. The temporary to which the reference is bound or the temporary that is the complete object of a subobject to which the reference is bound persists for the lifetime of the reference...

As you can see the highlighted line makes it clear that binding reference to sub-objects is acceptable, as the complete object has to have its lifetime extended as well.

Note that first does qualify as a subobject [intro.object]:

  1. Objects can contain other objects, called subobjects. A subobject can be a member subobject (9.2), a base class subobject (Clause 10), or an array element. An object that is not a subobject of any other object is called a complete object.
  • 1
    I'm 99% sure the highlighted text refers specifically to binding a parent-class reference to a child-class temporary object. – Mark B Jul 6 '16 at 14:47
  • @MarkB Why do you think that? – Barry Jul 6 '16 at 14:52
  • @MarkB - see my update. I've included definition of subobject – Smeeheey Jul 6 '16 at 14:53
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    Here, first is the subobject and pair is the complete object. The rules say that "the complete object (i.e. pair) of the subobject (i.e. first) to which the reference is bound" also has to have the lifetime-extension – Smeeheey Jul 6 '16 at 14:56
  • 1
    I'm not stating that the standard shows that .first is a temporary object. I'm saying the standard is ambiguous on the term. In fact it repeatedly refers to it without formally defining it. However, if a subobject of a temporary object is not a temporary object itself, then I don't see under what circumstances the highlighted part of the rule in my answer above could possibly apply, and therefore the point of said part of rule. – Smeeheey Jul 6 '16 at 16:18
7

It's well defined.

From the standard: $12.2/6 Temporary objects [class.temporary]:

(emphasis mine)

The temporary to which the reference is bound or the temporary that is the complete object of a subobject to which the reference is bound persists for the lifetime of the reference

And about the subobect, $1.8/2 The C++ object model [intro.object]:

(emphasis mine)

Objects can contain other objects, called subobjects. A subobject can be a member subobject ([class.mem]), a base class subobject (Clause [class.derived]), or an array element. An object that is not a subobject of any other object is called a complete object.

first is bound to reference and it's the member subobject of std::pair, so the temporary std::pair (i.e. the complete object) 's lifetime will be prolonged, the code should be fine.

For reference only: Clang and GCC say yes, VC says no.

  • But is first the complete object of a subobject? – NathanOliver Jul 6 '16 at 14:53
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    @NathanOliver The temporary that is the complete object of a subobject... Not first. – songyuanyao Jul 6 '16 at 14:54
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    Looks like gcc bug. See open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/docs/cwg_defects.html. "1834. Constant initialization binding a reference to an xvalue". I think first here is an xvalue. – Arunmu Jul 6 '16 at 15:02
  • 2
    GCC doesn't implement CWG 1834 yet - if you tried the same with a non-integral type (to avoid the constant collapsing), you'd see the same behavior from gcc. – Barry Jul 6 '16 at 15:19
  • @Barry and Arunmu, you're right. Glad to know that. – songyuanyao Jul 6 '16 at 15:39
2

As I mentioned in my comment:

The lifetime of the temporary should be prolonged as long as the lifetime of its member access (str in this case). That said, you should be just ok by taking return value by copy. RVO will avoid doing extra copies.

From the standard, section 12.2.5:

The second context is when a reference is bound to a temporary. The temporary to which the reference is bound or the temporary that is the complete object of a subobject to which the reference is bound persists for the lifetime of the reference except:

— A temporary bound to a reference member in a constructor’s ctor-initializer (12.6.2) persists until the constructor exits.

— A temporary bound to a reference parameter in a function call (5.2.2) persists until the completion of the full-expression containing the call.

To stay clear out of any trouble, I would rather do:

auto m_p = getPair(x);

This is as efficient as it can get because of RVO which every compiler must be doing for this case.

  • The temporary to which the reference is bound or the temporary that is the complete object of a subobject to which the reference is bound persists for the lifetime of the reference except says nothing about class members which is what first is. – NathanOliver Jul 6 '16 at 14:47
  • Isn't first a subobject of pair in this case ? – Arunmu Jul 6 '16 at 14:48
  • 1
    I am pretty sure it is talking about const base& foo = deriveied_temporary(). here. – NathanOliver Jul 6 '16 at 14:50
  • @NathanOliver - see [intro.object/2] (as per my answer). Here first is indeed a subobject. – Smeeheey Jul 6 '16 at 14:52
  • @NathanOliver Yeah, I agree with Smeeheey. That's what it seems like. Can you tell why you think otherwise ? – Arunmu Jul 6 '16 at 14:55
-1

This seems addressed in 12.2/4-5:

There are two contexts in which temporaries are destroyed at a different point than the end of the full expression. The first context... [stuff dealing with arrays]

The second context is when a reference is bound to a temporary. The temporary to which the reference is bound or the temporary that is the complete object of a subobject to which the reference is bound persists for the lifetime of the reference except:

There are four exceptions dealing with constructor binding of reference members, function calls, functions returning by reference, and references bound in new-initializers.

None of these cases apply, so the temporary is destroyed at the end of the full statement, leaving a dangling reference to a member of the temporary.

Just help the compiler realize it can move from the temporary: const auto str = std::move(getPair(x).first);

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