This question already has an answer here:

I've encountered difference in behavior between width and flex-basis which I am not able to explain by What are the differences between flex-basis and width?.

.outer {
  display: flex;
  background: yellow;
  padding: 10px;
}
.middle {
  display: flex;
  flex-shrink: 0;
  background: red;
  padding: 10px;
}
.inner {
  flex-basis: 258px;
  flex-shrink: 0;
  display: flex;
  flex-grow: 0;
  background: green;
}
.inner2 {
  width: 258px;
  flex-shrink: 0;
  display: flex;
  flex-grow: 0;
  background: green;
}
<div class="outer">
  <div class="middle">
    <div class="inner">
      hello
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

<div class="outer">
  <div class="middle">
    <div class="inner2">
      hello
    </div>
  </div>
</div>

Here is the example illustrating the problem I'm having. I'm expecting both rows to look the same, however, when using flex-basis (row 1), the flex container (.middle element) seems to ignore intrinsic width of its child (.inner element) and only takes the text into account.

This difference can be observed in the latest versions of Chrome, FF and Safari (but not in IE11/Edge).

Clarification: I'm not asking why IE11/Edge behaves the way it does. Its behaviour (in this case) actually seems logical to me. I'm asking why there is difference in all other browsers.

Update: Edge 13 behaves just like IE11.

marked as duplicate by Michael_B css Sep 11 at 0:18

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • This reminds me of nested flex elements don't make parent grow – Oriol Jul 11 '16 at 2:12
  • The problem is explained in the "Browser Bugs" section of the accepted answer in the duplicate. – Michael_B Sep 11 at 0:22
  • As pointed out in my own reply to my question, the difference is explained by a browser bug. The answer you're referring to doesn't cover this, so I don't think my question is a duplicate. – Dremora Sep 11 at 16:30
up vote 3 down vote accepted

This seems to be a bug. An element which is both flex container and flex item seems to be ignoring intrinsic dimensions of its children if they are set via flex-basis, instead choosing to measure the width/height of contents of its children instead. It is ironic that IE11/Edge is the only browser implementing this correctly.

Chromium bug tracker

This is because IE11 supports flex differently (only partially support technically). IE 11 requires a unit to be added to the third argument, the flex-basis property see msdn documentation in the source below.

So flex shorthand declarations with unitless flex-basis values are ignored.

flex-basis is the minimum width, a container can have, then it will grow/shrink based on your other rules. Width does not need to be used at the same time as flex and flex-basis, as they conflict with X-browser compatibility.

I've updated your codepen also, to help explain. Please see here: http://codepen.io/mattpark22/pen/wWqKpz

Now you can see how differently browsers handle flex with:

flex-basis: 258px;
width: 258px;

I've also removed

display: flex;

from .outer - this was having an effect also.

Source: http://caniuse.com/#search=flex-basis

Source: https://github.com/philipwalton/flexbugs#4-flex-shorthand-declarations-with-unitless-flex-basis-values-are-ignored

Source: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn254946%28v=vs.85%29.aspx

  • I understand that the behaviour is different, but the way IE11 renders seems more logical to me. Also, unit is only required to be provided when using the shorthand flex property — I'm using full flex-basis property here (and I provide unit anyway). – Dremora Jul 6 '16 at 15:26
  • I have updated my answer to help explain it better, please let me know if that helps? – mattpark22 Jul 6 '16 at 15:30
  • I have updated my answer again, please let me know if you need any further clarification - happy to help @Dremora – mattpark22 Jul 6 '16 at 15:37
  • Without display: flex on the outer container the middle element stops being the flex-item — which removes the difference but doesn't explain why they rendered differently in the first place. – Dremora Jul 6 '16 at 15:41
  • 1
    I know that IE often behaves not as expected, I've been developing for the web for the last 10 years. But in this case its behaviour actually seems logical to me, so I'm wondering what is causing the difference between width and flex-basis in other browsers. – Dremora Jul 6 '16 at 15:53

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