I'm working on a query where I need to pull a list of all patients from a certain clinic who smoke or use some sort of tobacco. I then need to pull a list that shows any of those patients who have had tobacco cessation counseling within a given time frame.

I think I'm doing this right, but I'm not sure. The front-end system is such that we often end up with inaccurate data (don't even get me started). When I run my query the way it is, I get a number that I'm pretty sure is way too low, but I'm not sure if it's just something with the data or if there's an issue with my query. Here's what I've got.

First of all, this is my query to find all the tobacco users. The "status" column indicates the type of use -- you'll see here that I'm filtering out 3, 4, and 6, which stand for "former user," "never used," and "unknown" (I'm just looking at people who are for sure currently using tobacco - these entries get updated, if applicable, every time the patient visits).

SELECT DISTINCT sh.PatientID, sh.Description, sh.Category, sh.Status, pd.Physician, vi.VisitDate

FROM SocialHistory sh JOIN PatientDemographic pd ON sh.PatientID = pd.PatientID 
     JOIN VisitInfo vi ON vi.PatientID = pd.PatientID

WHERE sh.Description LIKE '%tobacco%'
     AND sh.Status != 3
     AND sh.Status != 4
     AND sh.Status != 6

That query gives me a little over 3000 results, which seems about right considering the total patient population at the clinic.

Now I need to pull everyone from that result set who has had cessation counseling (which is entered as a procedure code - I added the field to the select list) between January 1, 2016 and June 30, 2016. Here's what I have:

SELECT DISTINCT sh.PatientID, vi.ProcedureCode, pd.Physician, vi.VisitDate

FROM
    (SELECT DISTINCT sh.PatientID, sh.Description, sh.Category, sh.Status, 
     pd.Physician, vi.VisitDate, vi.ProcedureCode

     FROM SocialHistory sh JOIN PatientDemographic pd ON sh.PatientID = pd.PatientID 
     JOIN VisitInfo vi ON vi.PatientID = pd.PatientID

     WHERE sh.Description LIKE '%tobacco%'
     AND sh.Status != 3
     AND sh.Status != 4
     AND sh.Status != 6

    ) VisitInfo

WHERE vi.ProcedureCode IN ('counseling1','counseling2','counseling3')

AND VisitDate BETWEEN '01/01/2016' AND '06/30/2016'

I'm only getting about 190 results with this, which seems really low given the 3000+ tobacco users. But it could be accurate. I just wanted to make sure my query was done right. Is that nested SELECT statement structured correctly?

  • 1
    Your AND VisitDate BETWEEN '01/01/2016' AND '06/30/2016' covers just 6 months. And btw: Avoid culture specific date format. Better us unseparated like 20160101 or ODBC like {d'2016-01-01'} or ISO 8601! – Shnugo Jul 6 '16 at 16:50
  • Not really sure why you have the subquery here. Also, no need for nested distinct like that. And if you don't need the columns in your outer query you shouldn't select them in the subquery. sh.Description, sh.Category, sh.Status could all be eliminated as they are not used. – Sean Lange Jul 6 '16 at 16:52
  • Yeah I'm just looking at the 6-month time frame. I was under the impression that I needed the subquery in order to make sure I'm pulling results from the first result set. Basically I'm saying "select tobacco users from all patients, then select counseling patients from the tobacco users." Sure, I guess I could select counseling patients from all patients, but the point is to know which users have had counseling and which haven't. I thought I'd need to look at the overall number of users first. – EJF Jul 6 '16 at 17:03
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is another way to write your query that is a little more readable and removes need of sub select.

SELECT DISTINCT
   sh.PatientID
   ,vi.ProcedureCode
   ,pd.Physician
   ,vi.VisitDate
 FROM
   SocialHistory sh
   INNER JOIN PatientDemographic pd
   ON sh.PatientID = pd.PatientID 
   INNER JOIN VisitInfo vi
   ON vi.PatientID = pd.PatientID
   AND vi.ProcedureCode IN ('counseling1','counseling2','counseling3')
   AND VisitDate BETWEEN '01/01/2016' AND '06/30/2016'
 WHERE
   sh.Description LIKE '%tobacco%'
   AND sh.Status NOT IN (3,4,6)

The 6 months is more likely why you have a lower number of records, expand that time frame or comment that line altogether to test what your result set would be and see if it is in line with what you believe the results should be. If so then you know it is the 6 months.

  • Yeah I'd wondered if the 6 months was the issue. If I get rid of the date range altogether, it's only about 990, which still seems low (only about 1/3 of the total tobacco users). Still not sure if that's accurate, but there's definitely a difference depending on the selected time frame. – EJF Jul 6 '16 at 17:09
  • 1
    1/3 of your patients going through counseling to quit tabacco use doesn't seem low to me at all especially if they are the one that has to seek the counseling. Even if it is force offered it doesn't see low......... But I am not in health care so... The other thing you may want to consider is if you have all of the Procedure Codes if you are missing one it could be a reason for the results to be low. – Matt Jul 6 '16 at 17:12
  • Yeah that's my issue - I just do back-end data and don't know a lot about the actual clinical workflows in terms of knowing what sorts of numbers or accurate. But 1/3 might be correct. I'll ask around. Thanks for the help though! This version of the query worked great and, yes, is definitely more readable. – EJF Jul 6 '16 at 17:16
  • 1
    your welcome, good luck – Matt Jul 6 '16 at 17:17

I don't see anything incorrect about your query, but as Matt points out, you don't need a subquery. I would write it this way,

SELECT DISTINCT sh.PatientID, vi.ProcedureCode, pd.Physician, vi.VisitDate
FROM SocialHistory as sh
JOIN PatientDemographic as pd ON sh.PatientID = pd.PatientID 
JOIN VisitInfo as vi          ON vi.PatientID = pd.PatientID
WHERE
    sh.Description LIKE '%tobacco%'
AND sh.Status not in (3, 4, 6)
AND vi.ProcedureCode IN ('counseling1','counseling2','counseling3')
AND VisitDate BETWEEN '01/01/2016' AND '06/30/2016'

because that uses JOIN only for matching criteria, and WHERE for restriction. (I believe SQL Server will show the same query plan for both queries, and probably for yours, too.)

When you do use subqueries, eschew DISTINCT in them unless it's semantically significant. In your query, you get distinct patients, and then a distinct set of those patients. Only one is needed. The query planner should find a shortcut, but might not, and anyone reading your SQL just has that much more noise to see through.

As to troubleshooting, you might try something like this to see what you're dealing with:

select   count(distinct PatientID) as N, M, Y
from (
    SELECT   sh.PatientID, vi.ProcedureCode, pd.Physician, vi.VisitDate
           , year(vi.VisitDate) as Y
           , month(vi.VisitDate) as M
    FROM SocialHistory as sh
    JOIN PatientDemographic as pd ON sh.PatientID = pd.PatientID 
    JOIN VisitInfo as vi          ON vi.PatientID = pd.PatientID
    WHERE
        sh.Description LIKE '%tobacco%'
    AND sh.Status not in (3, 4, 6)
    AND vi.ProcedureCode IN ('counseling1','counseling2','counseling3')
    --- VisitDate BETWEEN '01/01/2016' AND '06/30/2016'
) as V
group by M, Y

If that's too much to look at, group by only Y instead, or maybe where M = 1.

Here, Try below. Since you just need patients who are counselled, this will return the patients and providers data. If you want the patients who are also not counselled, just comment out where IsCounselledStatus > 0 portion and everyone with '0' are not counselled.

declare @StartDate datetime = '1/1/'+cast(datepart(YEAR,getdate()) as varchar(4));
declare @EndDate datetime = '6/30/'+cast(datepart(YEAR,getdate()) as varchar(4));

;with cte as
(
    select sh.PatientID, sh.Description, sh.Category, sh.Status, pd.Physician, vi.VisitDate, vi.ProcedureCode,
        case when (sh. status not in (3,4,6) 
                    and sh.Description LIKE '%tobacco%' 
                    and VisitDate BETWEEN @StartDate AND @EndDate
                    and vi.ProcedureCode IN ('counseling1','counseling2','counseling3')
                   ) then 1 else 0 end as IsCounselled
    from SocialHistory sh JOIN PatientDemographic pd ON sh.PatientID = pd.PatientID 
    join VisitInfo vi ON vi.PatientID = pd.PatientID 
)
select PatientID, Physician, sum(IsCounselled) IsCounselledStatus
from cte c
where IsCounselledStatus > 0
group by PatientID, Physician

Also, As David Pointed out, It would be better if you have your reference items in a table.

Just a suggestion to improve your coding. Computers are good at memorizing codes for things; people are not. Having to enter '2' for 'former smoker' or '5' for 'lives in Minnesota' is beyond ridiculous. There should be a TABLE that relates the codes to the actual statuses, so you can look things up if need be. Either that, or use short string codes, like 'FSM' for 'former smoker' or 'LMN' for lives in Minnesota: that sort of thing.

  • There is a table. SocialHistory is actually a view and that Status field originates in a SubstanceUse table that shows what each of the codes stand for. – EJF Jul 6 '16 at 17:04
  • 2
    Bruce lookup tables are valid, presumptuous that EJF didn't have them. But even when you code something like this you would probably just go get the codes you need from a lookup table and use the ids... Also be very careful injecting business logic into a short string in place of lookup tables that can get messed up very quick! – Matt Jul 6 '16 at 17:14

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