1

I looked at a lot of other questions and answers and no one seems to have the same question I do.

I am trying to make references to variables, both within a class. I took out the part of the larger program I am writing and isolated it in a little file: test.cpp. I thought maybe my problem had something to do with how I was using the variable with the reference, but the same messages appeared as in the larger program.

Here is my code:

#include <iostream>

class Test {
public:
    int test;
    int& rtest = test;
};

int main() {
    std::cout << "Enter an integer: ";
    std::cin >> Test.rtest;
    std::cout << "\n" << Test.rtest << "\n";
    return 0;
}

I received these messages:

warning: non-static data member initializers only available with -std=c++11 or -std=gnu++11
     int& rtest = test;

In function ‘int main()’: error: expected primary-expression before ‘.’ token
     std::cin >> Test.rtest;

error: expected primary-expression before ‘.’ token std::cout << "\n" << Test.rtest << "\n";

Why am I getting these? Is what I am trying to do possible? If so, how can I do it?

4

warning: non-static data member initializers only available with -std=c++11 or -std=gnu++11 int& rtest = test;

You need to pass the flag -std=c++11 to your compiler, otherwise it defaults to an older version of C++ which doesn't allow you to initialize class members in that way.

In function ‘int main()’: error: expected primary-expression before ‘.’ token std::cin >> Test.rtest; error: expected primary-expression before ‘.’ token std::cout << "\n" << Test.rtest << "\n";

This is because the . operator wants an instance of your class, not the class itself (that's what :: would be for). Declare e.g. Test test; and use test.rtest instead.

  • Passing the flag to g++ did work, though it took me a couple of minutes of research to figure out how to do it. – user6054931 Jul 6 '16 at 18:50
3

You need to have an instance of Test to access non static members of a class:

int main() {
    Test t; // <<<<<<<<
    std::cout << "Enter an integer: ";
    std::cin >> t.rtest;
    std::cout << "\n" << t.rtest << "\n";
}

Also you need to initialize the reference with an appropriate constructor, unless you have the -std=c++11 compiler flag enabled as the error message says:

class Test {
public:
    int test;
    int& rtest; // Nope!  = test;

    Test() : test(), rtest(test) {} // <<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<
};
  • Nice answer. Thanks for sharing the compiler flag – Drew Aug 14 '16 at 22:23

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