55

Here's what I have going:

import 'whatwg-fetch';

function fetchVehicle(id) {
    return dispatch => {
        return dispatch({
            type: 'FETCH_VEHICLE',
            payload: fetch(`http://swapi.co/api/vehicles/${id}/`)
                .then(status)
                .then(res => res.json())            
                .catch(error => {
                    throw(error);
                })
            });
    };
}

function status(res) {
    if (!res.ok) {
        return Promise.reject()
    }
    return res;
}

EDIT: The promise doesn't get rejected, that's what I'm trying to figure out.

I'm using this fetch polyfill in Redux with redux-promise-middleware.

  • 1
    You throw an exception in catch but do not catch it. – zerkms Jul 7 '16 at 0:08
  • It does get to the catch (which catches all rejections in the whole chain it is attached to), but the catch callback doesn't handle anything - it only rethrows the error. Replace the throw with a console.error or so. – Bergi Jul 7 '16 at 0:17
  • The browser freezes? That definitely shouldn't happen. – Bergi Jul 7 '16 at 0:18
  • Thanks guys, I'm a bit new to this, the freeze was caused by something else. I think this is an issue for me because the polyfill treats a 404 as a successful response. I'm having a bit of trouble rejecting the promise, once I figure that out it should be fine. – Vlady Veselinov Jul 7 '16 at 0:52
  • something more good github.com/github/fetch/issues/203#issuecomment-143347675 – Usman I Feb 4 at 9:51
136
2

Fetch promises only reject with a TypeError when a network error occurs. Since 4xx and 5xx responses aren't network errors, there's nothing to catch. You'll need to throw an error yourself to use Promise#catch.

A fetch Response conveniently supplies an ok , which tells you whether the request succeeded. Something like this should do the trick:

fetch(url).then((response) => {
  if (response.ok) {
    return response.json();
  } else {
    throw new Error('Something went wrong');
  }
})
.then((responseJson) => {
  // Do something with the response
})
.catch((error) => {
  console.log(error)
});
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    I did not find a property 'ok' instead I checked for response.status === 200. – Torsten Barthel Mar 14 '18 at 3:55
  • 3
    Why can't I tell from my code why the TypeError was thrown? In the console I see in one case it was "net::ERR_CONNECTION_TIMED_OUT" but in another it was "(blocked:mixed-content)" and I don't want to respond the same to both. – Michael Apr 3 '18 at 19:05
  • will this solution stops getting errors in console such as 401 invalid request ? – Shiva Sai Apr 19 '18 at 7:41
  • 2
    How can we return custom responses when there's no network connection or when the server responded with e.g. a 503 Service Temp. Unavailable if the result of a rejected promise is a TypeError? – tonix Jul 11 '18 at 21:29
13
1

Thanks for the help everyone, rejecting the promise in .catch() solved my issue:

export function fetchVehicle(id) {
    return dispatch => {
        return dispatch({
            type: 'FETCH_VEHICLE',
            payload: fetch(`http://swapi.co/api/vehicles/${id}/`)
                .then(status)
                .then(res => res.json())    
                .catch(error => {
                    return Promise.reject()
                })
            });
    };
}


function status(res) {
    if (!res.ok) {
        throw new Error(res.statusText);
    }
    return res;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • You could also reject the Promise from your status function as so: function status(res) { if (!res.ok) { return Promise.reject(res.statusText); } return res; } Or actually you could reject the promise with the message given by your endpoint. – Watchmaker Mar 14 '19 at 15:00
  • Or actually you could reject the promise with the message given by your endpoint if you jsonfy that response and then return a Promise rejected with the properties that you choose from your jsonfied response. – Watchmaker Mar 14 '19 at 15:07
  • 1
    That .catch(error => { return Promise.reject() }) seems rather pointless. Why suppress the useful error and reject with undefined instead? – Bergi Sep 26 '19 at 21:52
  • @Bergi The reason why return Promise.reject() could be useful inside catch is that you can further chain the promise otherwise with a plain catch you would need to check for non empty arg in the success handler. – Vivek Apr 28 at 15:43
  • @Vivek Or you could equally just throw undefined;. What I'm complaining about was not the rejection, but ignoring the error. Probably the whole thing should be omitted though. – Bergi Apr 28 at 15:50
2
0

I just checked the status of the response object:

$promise.then( function successCallback(response) {  
  console.log(response);
  if (response.status === 200) { ... }
});
| improve this answer | |
0
0

For me, fny answers really got it all. since fetch is not throwing error, we need to throw/handle the error ourselves. Posting my solution with async/await. I think it's more strait forward and readable

Solution 1: Not throwing an error, handle the error ourselves

  async _fetch(request) {
    const fetchResult = await fetch(request); //Making the req
    const result = await fetchResult.json(); // parsing the response

    if (fetchResult.ok) {
      return result; // return success object
    }


    const responseError = {
      type: 'Error',
      message: result.message || 'Something went wrong',
      data: result.data || '',
      code: result.code || '',
    };

    const error = new Error();
    error.info = responseError;

    return (error);
  }

Here if we getting an error, we are building an error object, plain JS object and returning it, the con is that we need to handle it outside. How to use:

  const userSaved = await apiCall(data); // calling fetch
  if (userSaved instanceof Error) {
    debug.log('Failed saving user', userSaved); // handle error

    return;
  }
  debug.log('Success saving user', userSaved); // handle success

Solution 2: Throwing an error, using try/catch

async _fetch(request) {
    const fetchResult = await fetch(request);
    const result = await fetchResult.json();

    if (fetchResult.ok) {
      return result;
    }

    const responseError = {
      type: 'Error',
      message: result.message || 'Something went wrong',
      data: result.data || '',
      code: result.code || '',
    };

    let error = new Error();
    error = { ...error, ...responseError };
    throw (error);
  }

Here we are throwing and error that we created, since Error ctor approve only string, Im creating the plain Error js object, and the use will be:

  try {
    const userSaved = await apiCall(data); // calling fetch
    debug.log('Success saving user', userSaved); // handle success
  } catch (e) {
    debug.log('Failed saving user', userSaved); // handle error
  }

Hope it helped.

| improve this answer | |

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