13

Let's say I have an array with data elements, in this example numbers, like this:

var a = [432, 238, 122, 883, 983];

And I want to limit the array, so that everytime I add an element to the array, it always keeps a length of let's say 7, or less and removes the oldest elements.

My current aproach looks like this:

function add(x) {
    a.unshift(x);
    a = a.slice(0, 7);
}

It works just fine, but isn't there a more elegant way to do it, like one line or something?

Edit: By "more elegant" I mean so that I don't need the add function and just easily could inline the code where I need it, without typing out a for example three times, and only having one line would also make the code "clearer"

  • 4
    "one line" doesn't means "more elegant way". Your code is good as this. – Marcos Pérez Gude Jul 7 '16 at 10:15
  • Why? This code is short, readable, does what you want, anyone can understand it. Why would you hunt for shorter variant of something that's already so short? – Mjh Jul 7 '16 at 10:15
  • 1
    a = [x, ...a.slice(0, 6)] – zerkms Jul 7 '16 at 10:17
  • 1
    Just a pointer, if your code works fine and objective of this question is to improve/optimize, CodeReviews is the right place. – Rajesh Jul 7 '16 at 10:19
  • The whole point of the function is to handle adding the new data and then ensuring a maximum length, which is what it does. Your code will only ever call add(n); so it's already minimised in a very sensible manner. There is no benefit to taking this any further. – Archer Jul 7 '16 at 10:25
13

Just to add another possible alternative:

a = [x, ...a.slice(0, 6)];

Even though I would personally choose Nina Scholz's solution (with a "better" condition for changing length and for older environments where ES6 is not supported)

References:

7

Just adjust the length property after pushing.

function add(x) {
    a.unshift(x);
    a.length = a.length < 7 ? a.length : 7;
}

The cleanes way is to check before

function add(x) {
    a.unshift(x);
    if (a.length > 7) {
        a.length = 7;
    }
}
  • You still need to check if the current length is larger than 7, otherwise it will expand smaller arrays with holes. – zerkms Jul 7 '16 at 10:18
  • 2
    a.length = a.length < 7 ? a.length : 7; --- ugh, that's nasty :-) – zerkms Jul 7 '16 at 10:20
  • 2
    You can try a.length = Math.min(a.length,7) – Rajesh Jul 7 '16 at 10:21
  • 1
    Or if (a.length > 7) a.length = 7;, there is nothing bad in imperative code. – zerkms Jul 7 '16 at 10:22
  • @zerkms or (a.length > 7) && (a.length = 7) – super Jul 7 '16 at 10:23
3

You can check the length of array when adding and Shift it (remove the first element) if the length has passed:

function add(x) {
    a.push(x);
    if (a.length > 7)
        a.shift();
}
0
a=add(188);

function add(x){
  a.push(x);
  return a.slice(1);
}
  • Could you provide some context to your answer, explaining how it answers the question? – bryan kennedy Jul 7 '16 at 13:22
0

You can also use Array.pop. Also if you wish to add a property to array, you can make it generic.

Array.prototype.Limit_push = function(x) {
  this.unshift(x);
  if (this.maxLength !== undefined && this.length > this.maxLength) 
    this.pop();
}

var a = [];
a.maxLength = 7
for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
  a.Limit_push(i);
  console.log(a)
}

var b = [];
for (var i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
  b.Limit_push(i);
  console.log(b)
}

0

If you want, you can modify the prototype of the Array object. This way all of your arrays can have their own max length.

This is cheap and effective, but it may not work well with other libraries and plugins.

Array.prototype.maxLength = Number.MAX_VALUE;
Array.prototype.add = function(item) {
  this.push(item);
  this.adjustLength();
}
Array.prototype.adjustLength = function() {
  this.length = Math.min(this.length, this.maxLength);
}


var a = [432, 238, 122, 883, 983];
a.maxLength = 7;

a.add(1);
a.add(2);
a.add(3); // Ignored
a.add(4); // Ignored

document.body.innerHTML = '<ol start="0">'+a.map(function(i){return'<li>'+i+'</li>'}).join('')+'</ol>';
ol li:before { content: '\0020\21d2\0020'; }

If you create your own class object and delegate to an underlying array, you can make this more portable and extensible.

function MyList(arr, maxLength) {
  this.arr = arr || [];
  this.maxLength = maxLength || Number.MAX_VALUE;
}

MyList.prototype = {
  add : function(item) {
    this.arr.push(item);
    this.adjustLength();
  },
  adjustLength : function() {
    this.arr.length = Math.min(this.arr.length, this.maxLength);
  },
  get : function() {
    return this.arr;
  }
};

var a = new MyList([432, 238, 122, 883, 983], 7);

a.add(1);
a.add(2);
a.add(3); // Ignored
a.add(4); // Ignored

document.body.innerHTML = '<ol start="0">'+a.get().map(function(i){return'<li>'+i+'</li>'}).join('')+'</ol>';
ol li:before { content: '\0020\21d2\0020'; }

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