34

Suppose I have a struct like this:

struct MyStruct
{
  uint8_t var0;
  uint32_t var1;
  uint8_t var2;
  uint8_t var3;
  uint8_t var4;
};

This is possibly going to waste a bunch (well not a ton) of space. This is because of necessary alignment of the uint32_t variable.

In actuality (after aligning the structure so that it can actually use the uint32_t variable) it might look something like this:

struct MyStruct
{
  uint8_t var0;
  uint8_t unused[3];  //3 bytes of wasted space
  uint32_t var1;
  uint8_t var2;
  uint8_t var3;
  uint8_t var4;
};

A more efficient struct would be:

struct MyStruct
{
  uint8_t var0;
  uint8_t var2;
  uint8_t var3;
  uint8_t var4;
  uint32_t var1;
};

Now, the question is:

Why is the compiler forbidden (by the standard) from reordering the struct?

I don't see any way you could shoot your self in the foot if the struct was reordered.

14
  • 19
    Serialization? You streamed out a struct to a file, then recompiled, and tried to stream it back in. If a compiler were allowed to re-order the members, what would the result be? – IInspectable Jul 7 '16 at 11:51
  • 5
    @IInspectable - that's dangerous anyway, in general (without using platform-specific packing pragmas, etc.) – Oliver Charlesworth Jul 7 '16 at 11:52
  • 5
    I don't know why the standard explicitly forbids reordering. But even if it didn't compilers still couldn't do it as it would require the compiler to be omniscient. (Remember, it is legal to access a structure through a pointer to a structure of a compatible, but not identical, type.) – David Schwartz Jul 7 '16 at 11:56
  • 9
    I am doomed if that structure was my protocol header struct. – Arunmu Jul 7 '16 at 11:58
  • 6
    Eric Raymond says, in The Lost Art of C Structure Packing that "C is a language originally designed for writing operating systems and other code close to the hardware. Automatic reordering would interfere with a systems programmer’s ability to lay out structures that exactly match the byte and bit-level layout of memory-mapped device control blocks." – Rob K Jul 7 '16 at 14:37
39

Why is the compiler forbidden (by the standard) from reordering the struct?

The basic reason is: for compatibility with C.

Remember that C is, originally, a high-level assembly language. It is quite common in C to view memory (network packets, ...) by reinterpreting the bytes as a specific struct.

This has led to multiple features relying on this property:

  • C guaranteed that the address of a struct and the address of its first data member are one and the same, so C++ does too (in the absence of virtual inheritance/methods).

  • C guaranteed that if you have two struct A and B and both start with a data member char followed by a data member int (and whatever after), then when you put them in a union you can write the B member and read the char and int through its A member, so C++ does too: Standard Layout.

The latter is extremely broad, and completely prevents any re-ordering of data members for most struct (or class).


Note that the Standard does allow some re-ordering: since C did not have the concept of access control, C++ specifies that the relative order of two data members with a different access control specifier is unspecified.

As far as I know, no compiler attempts to take advantage of it; but they could in theory.

Outside of C++, languages such as Rust allow compilers to re-order fields and the main Rust compiler (rustc) does so by default. Only historical decisions and a strong desire for backward compatibility prevent C++ from doing so.

1
29

I don't see any way you could shoot your self in the foot, if the struct was reordered.

Really? If this were permitted, communication between libraries/modules even in the same process would be ludicrously dangerous by default.

"In universe" argument

We must be able to know that our structs are defined the way that we've asked them to be. It's bad enough that padding is unspecified! Fortunately, you can control this when you need to.

Okay, theoretically, a new language could be made such that, similarly, members were re-orderable unless some attribute were given. After all, we're not supposed to do memory-level magic on objects so if one were to use only C++ idioms, you'd be safe by default.

But that's not the practical reality in which we live.


"Out of universe" argument

You could make things safe if, in your words, "the same reorder was used every time". The language would have to state unambiguously how members would be ordered. That's complicated to write in the standard, complicated to understand, and complicated to implement.

It's much easier to just guarantee that the order will be as it is in code, and leave these decisions to the programmer. Remember, these rules have origin in old C, and old C gives power to the programmer.

You've already shown in your question how easy it is to make the struct padding-efficient with a trivial code change. There's no need for any added complexity at the language level to do this for you.

16
  • 2
    Not if the same reorder was used every time..... – DarthRubik Jul 7 '16 at 11:52
  • 5
    @DarthRubik: And how do you enforce every run of every compiler using the same order every time? Oh, that's right, by leaving it as the programmer wrote it lol – Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 7 '16 at 11:53
  • 7
    Communication between libraries/modules within the same process would be ludicrously dangerous. – Oliver Charlesworth Jul 7 '16 at 11:54
  • 4
    @Revolver_Ocelot A platform could, as part of its ABI, specify a simple, deterministic reordering scheme that got a significant fraction of packing benefit for minimal cost. For example, just stably sorting objects by size (largest first) would do. – David Schwartz Jul 7 '16 at 12:07
  • 2
    The Language does not have to specify padding or order for compatibility across modules; this handled by the ABI, much like function calls are. – Matthieu M. Jul 7 '16 at 14:20
15

The standard guarantees an allocation order simply because structs may represent a certain memory layout, such as a data protocol or a collection of hardware registers. For example, neither the programmer nor the compiler is free to re-arrange the order of the bytes in the TPC/IP protocol, or the hardware registers of a microcontroller.

If the order was not guaranteed, structs would be mere, abstract data containers (similar to C++ vector), of which we can't assume much, except that they somehow contain the data we put inside them. It would make them substantially more useless when doing any form of low-level programming.

7
  • But doesn't this violate the basic "don't pay for what you don't use" maxim? Surely such cases are in the minority and the benefits of less memory consumption and less memory bandwidth usage are not tiny. This is a good argument for a keyword to avoid reordering but not for never reordering. – David Schwartz Jul 7 '16 at 12:03
  • 1
    @DavidSchwartz Well... structs are a half-hearted attempt to suit everyone, hardware programmers as well as CPUs with alignment. They would be far more useful and portable if struct padding was not handled automatically by the compiler. I suppose two different data types: "strict struct" and "i dont care struct" would have been very handy. Kind of like uint8_t versus uint_fast8_t. – Lundin Jul 7 '16 at 12:07
  • So maybe it was because you sometimes need structs whose order is preserved and there never seemed to be a good enough reason to specifying two different types of structs in the standard? – David Schwartz Jul 7 '16 at 12:09
  • @DavidSchwartz These days, if you really need tighter memory usage then you're almost certainly working on an embedded platform, because memory usage at this kind of level hasn't really been a serious consideration on PCs for a couple of decades. If you're working on embedded stuff, it's pretty much inevitable that you know about these kind of issues and are able to sort it out yourself - and if you don't then it's high time you did. So the only people this would help would be less-competent novice embedded coders, and on the scale of challenges they face, I think this is pretty small beer. – Graham Jul 7 '16 at 16:18
  • @Graham The issue with struct member ordering and padding is not memory use, but that it can cause a struct not to replicate the intended data protocol/hardware registers it should represent. A struct with both fixed order and no padding would help everyone. Today we have to resort to non-standard C like #pragma pack etc to make this work. – Lundin Jul 8 '16 at 6:04
8

The compiler should keep the order of its members in the case the structures are read by any other low-level code produced by another compiler or another language. Say you were creating an operating system, and you decide to write part of it in C, and part of it in assembly. You could define the following structure:

struct keyboard_input
{
    uint8_t modifiers;
    uint32_t scancode;
}

You pass this to an assembly routine, where you need to manually specify the memory layout of the structure. You would expect to be able to write the following code on a system with 4-byte alignment.

; The memory location of the structure is located in ebx in this example
mov al, [ebx]
mov edx, [ebx+4]

Now say the compiler would change the order of the members in the structure in an implementation defined way, this would mean that depending on the compiler you use and the flags you pass to it, you could either end up with the first byte of the scancode member in al, or with the modifiers member.

Of course the problem is not just reduced to low-level interfaces with assembly routines, but would also appear if libraries built with different compilers would call each other (e.g. building a program with mingw using the windows API).

Because of this, the language just forces you to think about the structure layout.

3
  • This doesn't make sense. The standards doesn't require enough to guarantee this. For example, it permits the padding to change based on what compiler you use and what flags you pass to it. So this doesn't explain why reordering specifically is prohibited. – David Schwartz Jul 7 '16 at 12:05
  • 3
    Hence the system with 4-byte alignment. It would be a system where all members of data structures are padded to start on a 4-byte boundary, which is rather common on 32-bit systems. – Shadowwolf Jul 7 '16 at 12:16
  • 1
    @DavidSchwartz Yes, but that doesn't matter - padding is a thing of the system, and when you're writing assembly, you're coding to the system already. And don't think there aren't plenty of people who are annoyed by the automatic packing either ;) – Luaan Jul 8 '16 at 8:22
6

Remember that not only automatic re-ordering of the elements to improve packing can work in detriment of specific memory layouts or binary serialization, but the order of the properties may have been carefully chosen by the programmer to benefit cache-locality of frequently used members against the more rarely accessed.

5

The language designed by Dennis Ritchie defined the semantics of structures not in terms of behavior, but in terms of memory layout. If a structure S had a member M of type T at offset X, then the behavior of M.S was defined as taking the address of S, adding X bytes to it, interpreting it as a pointer to T, and interpreting the storage identified thereby as an lvalue. Writing a structure member would change the contents of its associated storage, and changing the contents of a member's storage would change the value of a member. Code was free to use a wide variety of ways of manipulating the storage associated with structure members, and the semantics would be defined in terms of operations on that storage.

Among the useful ways that code could manipulate the storage associated with a structure was the use of memcpy() to copy an arbitrary portion of one structure to a corresponding portion of another, or memset() to clear an arbitrary portion of a structure. Since structure members were laid out sequentially, a range of members could be copied or cleared using a single memcpy() or memset() call.

The language defined by the Standard Committee eliminates in many cases the requirement that changes to structure members must affect the underlying storage, or that changes to the storage affect the member values, making guarantees about structure layout less useful than they had been in Ritchie's language. Nonetheless, the ability to use memcpy() and memset() was retained, and retaining that ability required keeping structure elements sequential.

4

You also quote C++, so I'll give you a practical reasons why that can't happen.

Given there's no difference between class and struct, consider:

class MyClass
{
    string s;
    anotherObject b;

    MyClass() : s{"hello"}, b{s} 
    {}

};

Now C++ requires non-static data members to be initialized in the order they were declared:

— Then, non-static data members are initialized in the order they were declared in the class definition

as per [base.class.init/13]. So the compiler cannot reorder fields within the class definition, because otherwise (as an example) members depending on the initialization of others couldn't work.

The compiler isn't strictly required not reorder them in memory (for what I can say) — but, especially considering the example above, it would be terribly painful to keep track of that. And I doubt of any performance improvements, unlike padding.

5
  • 4
    [C++11: 9.2/14]: Nonstatic data members of a (non-union) class with the same access control (Clause 11) are allocated so that later members have higher addresses within a class object. (my emphasis) – Toby Speight Jul 7 '16 at 16:31
  • 2
    Surely initialisation order is independent of physical layout. – Jeremy Jul 8 '16 at 8:18
  • @Jeremy: It's not "sure". It actually is an immediate consequence, as I explain in my answer (if it's a bit unclear, I'll try to clarify it). – edmz Jul 8 '16 at 9:08
  • Please do clarify. – Jeremy Jul 8 '16 at 19:13
  • What do you mean by "The compiler isn't strictly required not reorder them in memory (for what I can say)"? Can you clarify that? – Karolis Milieška Jun 2 '18 at 20:10
-1

Imagine this struct layout is actually a memory sequence received 'over the wire', say an Ethernet packet. if the compiler re-aligned things to be more efficient, then you would have to do loads of work pulling out bytes in the required order, rather than just using a struct which has all the correct bytes in the correct order and place.

3
  • 2
    That's dangerous anyway, in general (without using platform-specific packing pragmas, etc. at both ends of the wire). – Oliver Charlesworth Jul 7 '16 at 11:53
  • 2
    @OliverCharlesworth yup, but if you're on an embedded processor with limited ram/rom, it's potentially the only way to go ! – Neil Jul 7 '16 at 11:55
  • 2
    Agreed. But the point is that in that scenario, you should already be explicitly controlling the struct layout. – Oliver Charlesworth Jul 7 '16 at 11:58

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