107

I have a component which calls a service to fetch data from a RESTful endpoint. This service needs to be given a callback function to execute after fetching said data.

The issue is when I try use the callback function to append the data to the existing data in a component's variable, I get a EXCEPTION: TypeError: Cannot read property 'messages' of undefined. Why is this undefined?

TypeScript version: Version 1.8.10

Controller code:

import {Component} from '@angular/core'
import {ApiService} from '...'

@Component({
    ...
})
export class MainComponent {

    private messages: Array<any>;

    constructor(private apiService: ApiService){}

    getMessages(){
        this.apiService.getMessages(gotMessages);
    }

    gotMessages(messagesFromApi){
        messagesFromApi.forEach((m) => {
            this.messages.push(m) // EXCEPTION: TypeError: Cannot read property 'messages' of undefined
        })
    }
}
2
  • Which version of TypeScript are you using? (You can check that with tsc -v)
    – rinukkusu
    Jul 7, 2016 at 12:28
  • The exception because forEach. Use For-of instead.
    – Pax Beach
    Mar 7, 2018 at 8:56

5 Answers 5

198

Use the Function.prototype.bind function:

getMessages() {
    this.apiService.getMessages(this.gotMessages.bind(this));
}

What happens here is that you pass the gotMessages as a callback, when that is being executed the scope is different and so the this is not what you expected.
The bind function returns a new function that is bound to the this you defined.

You can, of course, use an arrow function there as well:

getMessages() {
    this.apiService.getMessages(messages => this.gotMessages(messages));
}

I prefer the bind syntax, but it's up to you.

A third option so to bind the method to begin with:

export class MainComponent {
    getMessages = () => {
        ...
    }
}

Or

export class MainComponent {
    ...

    constructor(private apiService: ApiService) {
        this.getMessages = this.getMessages.bind(this);
    }

    getMessages(){
        this.apiService.getMessages(gotMessages);
    }
}
3
  • 1
    Worked, thanks! And thanks for explaining why this happens. Jul 7, 2016 at 12:33
  • Thank you! The fact that OOP-style is leaking javascript specifics (bind) is tragic.
    – skfd
    Oct 28, 2019 at 17:30
  • Totally argee with @skfd that the .bind( this ) should be default TypeScript behaviour, since we are programming OO! :-) But thanks, I'll remember to add this to all callbacks on class member functions now, which is always case in my case, since ... Aug 26, 2021 at 21:22
22

Or you can do it like this

gotMessages(messagesFromApi){
    let that = this // somebody uses self 
    messagesFromApi.forEach((m) => {
        that.messages.push(m) // or self.messages.push(m) - if you used self
    })
}
1
  • 1
    You are my hero
    – user13548229
    May 28, 2021 at 8:32
18

Because you're just passing the function reference in getMessages you don't have the right this context.

You can easily fix that by using a lambda which automatically binds the right this context for the use inside that anonymous function:

getMessages(){
    this.apiService.getMessages((data) => this.gotMessages(data));
}
2
  • That was it! Thanks Jul 7, 2016 at 12:32
  • 1
    Perfect. Simplest and efficient solution.
    – Kon
    Sep 27, 2019 at 14:56
1

I have same issue, resolved by using () => { } instead function()

1
  • this does not add any information to the existing answers
    – DerMike
    Oct 15, 2020 at 8:43
0

Please define function

gotMessages = (messagesFromApi) => {
  messagesFromApi.forEach((m) => {
    this.messages.push(m)
  })
}
1
  • this does not add any information to the existing answers
    – DerMike
    Oct 15, 2020 at 8:43

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