102

I have a pandas dataframe and I wish to divide it to 3 separate sets. I know that using train_test_split from sklearn.cross_validation, one can divide the data in two sets (train and test). However, I couldn't find any solution about splitting the data into three sets. Preferably, I'd like to have the indices of the original data.

I know that a workaround would be to use train_test_split two times and somehow adjust the indices. But is there a more standard / built-in way to split the data into 3 sets instead of 2?

  • 5
    This doesn't answer your specific question, but I think the more standard approach for this would be splitting into two sets, train and test, and running cross-validation on the training set thus eliminating the need for a stand alone "development" set. – David Jul 7 '16 at 16:40
  • 1
    This came up before, and as far as I know there is no built-in method for that yet. – ayhan Jul 7 '16 at 16:43
  • 5
    I suggest Hastie et al.'s The Elements of Statistical Learning for a discussion on why to use three sets instead of two (web.stanford.edu/~hastie/local.ftp/Springer/OLD/… Model assessment and selection chapter) – ayhan Jul 7 '16 at 17:16
  • 2
    @David In some models to prevent overfitting, there is a need for 3 sets instead of 2. Because in your design choices, you are somehow tuning parameters to improve performance on the test set. To prevent that, a development set is required. So, using cross validation will not be sufficient. – CentAu Jul 7 '16 at 17:23
  • 6
    @ayhan, a corrected URL for that book is statweb.stanford.edu/~tibs/ElemStatLearn/printings/…, chapter 7 (p. 219). – Camille Goudeseune May 8 '17 at 19:50
114

Numpy solution. We will split our data set into the following parts:

  • 60% - train set,
  • 20% - validation set,
  • 20% - test set

In [305]: train, validate, test = np.split(df.sample(frac=1), [int(.6*len(df)), int(.8*len(df))])

In [306]: train
Out[306]:
          A         B         C         D         E
0  0.046919  0.792216  0.206294  0.440346  0.038960
2  0.301010  0.625697  0.604724  0.936968  0.870064
1  0.642237  0.690403  0.813658  0.525379  0.396053
9  0.488484  0.389640  0.599637  0.122919  0.106505
8  0.842717  0.793315  0.554084  0.100361  0.367465
7  0.185214  0.603661  0.217677  0.281780  0.938540

In [307]: validate
Out[307]:
          A         B         C         D         E
5  0.806176  0.008896  0.362878  0.058903  0.026328
6  0.145777  0.485765  0.589272  0.806329  0.703479

In [308]: test
Out[308]:
          A         B         C         D         E
4  0.521640  0.332210  0.370177  0.859169  0.401087
3  0.333348  0.964011  0.083498  0.670386  0.169619

[int(.6*len(df)), int(.8*len(df))] - is an indices_or_sections array for numpy.split().

Here is a small demo for np.split() usage - let's split 20-elements array into the following parts: 80%, 10%, 10%:

In [45]: a = np.arange(1, 21)

In [46]: a
Out[46]: array([ 1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7,  8,  9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20])

In [47]: np.split(a, [int(.8 * len(a)), int(.9 * len(a))])
Out[47]:
[array([ 1,  2,  3,  4,  5,  6,  7,  8,  9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16]),
 array([17, 18]),
 array([19, 20])]
  • @root what exactly is the frac=1 parameter doing? – SpiderWasp42 Mar 12 '17 at 2:52
  • 1
    @SpiderWasp42, frac=1 instructs sample() function to return all (100% or fraction = 1.0) rows – MaxU Mar 12 '17 at 8:45
  • 7
    Thanks @MaxU. I'd like to mention 2 things to keep things simplified. First, use np.random.seed(any_number) before the split line to obtain same result with every run. Second, to make unequal ratio like train:test:val::50:40:10 use [int(.5*len(dfn)), int(.9*len(dfn))]. Here first element denotes size for train (0.5%), second element denotes size for val (1-0.9 = 0.1%) and difference between the two denotes size for test(0.9-0.5 = 0.4%). Correct me if I'm wrong :) – dataLeo May 7 '18 at 17:57
  • hrmm is it a mistake when you say "Here is a small demo for np.split() usage - let's split 20-elements array into the following parts: 90%, 10%, 10%:" I am pretty sure you mean 80%, 10%, 10% – Kevin Jan 11 at 21:19
  • How can we do it with stratifying in mind? – Andrew Naguib Jan 23 at 19:22
40

Note:

Function was written to handle seeding of randomized set creation. You should not rely on set splitting that doesn't randomize the sets.

import numpy as np
import pandas as pd

def train_validate_test_split(df, train_percent=.6, validate_percent=.2, seed=None):
    np.random.seed(seed)
    perm = np.random.permutation(df.index)
    m = len(df.index)
    train_end = int(train_percent * m)
    validate_end = int(validate_percent * m) + train_end
    train = df.ix[perm[:train_end]]
    validate = df.ix[perm[train_end:validate_end]]
    test = df.ix[perm[validate_end:]]
    return train, validate, test

Demonstration

np.random.seed([3,1415])
df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.rand(10, 5), columns=list('ABCDE'))
df

enter image description here

train, validate, test = train_validate_test_split(df)

train

enter image description here

validate

enter image description here

test

enter image description here

27

However, one approach to dividing the dataset into train, test, cv with 0.6, 0.2, 0.2 would be to use the train_test_split method twice.

from sklearn.model_selection import train_test_split

x, x_test, y, y_test = train_test_split(xtrain,labels,test_size=0.2,train_size=0.8)
x_train, x_cv, y_train, y_cv = train_test_split(x,y,test_size = 0.25,train_size =0.75)
8

One approach is use train_test_split function twice.

from sklearn.model_selection import train_test_split

X_train, X_test, y_train, y_test 
= train_test_split(X, y, test_size=0.2, random_state=1)

X_train, X_val, y_train, y_val 
= train_test_split(X_train, y_train, test_size=0.25, random_state=1)
1

It is very convenient to use train_test_split without performing reindexing after dividing to several sets and not writing some additional code. Best answer above does not mention that by separating two times using train_test_split not changing partition sizes won`t give initially intended partition:

x_train, x_remain = train_test_split(x, test_size=(val_size + test_size))

Then the portion of validation and test sets in the x_remain change and could be counted as

new_test_size = np.around(test_size / (val_size + test_size), 2)
# To preserve (new_test_size + new_val_size) = 1.0 
new_val_size = 1.0 - new_test_size

x_val, x_test = train_test_split(x_remain, test_size=new_test_size)

In this occasion all initial partitions are saved.

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