2

Why

echo date('c');

not equal with

$datetime = new DateTime();
echo $datetime->format(DateTime::ISO8601); 

The result:

2016-07-07T21:18:22+03:00
2016-07-07T21:18:22+0300

Both must give current time in ISO8601 format. In Wikipedia right format is 2016-07-07T21:18:22+03:00 but some banks use 2016-07-07T21:18:22+0300 format in API. Why?

2
  • 1
    Both are valid - en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_8601#Time_zone_designators - <time>Z, <time>±hh:mm, <time>±hhmm, <time>±hh are all valid according to that linked page; and see also Marcus Kuhn's summary
    – Mark Baker
    Jul 7 '16 at 18:35
  • @MarkBaker, You may not mix the zone designator in basic format with the date and time of day in extended format. ISO 8601:2004 is very clear: [...] the expression shall either be completely in basic format, in which case the minimum number of separators necessary for the required expression is used, or completely in extended format [...]
    – chansen
    Jul 12 '16 at 8:55
2

Still PHP does not interpret ISO8601 correctly when milliseconds are given, even with DateTime::ATOM.

$d=DateTime::createFromFormat(DateTime::ATOM,"2018-01-10T01:00:00.000Z"); 
// null

or using Carbon:

echo Carbon\Carbon::createFromFormat(Carbon\Carbon::ATOM,"2018-01-10T01:00:00.000Z","UTC");
// InvalidArgumentException with message 'The timezone could not be found in the database'

The best way is to let Carbon or datetime figure it out itself:

$d = new Carbon\Carbon("2018-01-10T01:00:00.000Z");
// -> 2018-01-10 01:00:00
$d = new Carbon\Carbon("2018-01-10T01:00:00Z");
// -> 2018-01-10 01:00:00
0

2016-07-07T21:18:22+03:00

Is the correct ISO 8601:2004 representation.

2016-07-07T21:18:22+0300

Is incorrect, the zone designator may not be in the basic format when the date and time of day is in the extended format.

ISO 8601:2004 4.3 Date and time of day:

[...] the expression shall either be completely in basic format, in which case the minimum number of separators necessary for the required expression is used, or completely in extended format, in which case additional separators shall be used [...]

Update 1:

ISO 8601 specifies three differerent date representations: calendar, ordinal and week dates. Theese can be formatted in either basic format (minimum number of seperators) or extended format (extension of the basic format that includes additional separators). ISO 8601 requires that the resulting expression is either consistently in basic format or consistently in extended format.

Combination of calendar date and time of day in local time with difference from UTC:

2016-07-07T21:18:22+03:00 (extended format)
20160707T211822+0300 (basic format)

Combination of ordinal date and time of day in local time with difference from UTC:

2016-189T21:18:22+03:00 (extended format)
2016189T211822+0300 (basic format)

Combination of week date and time of day in local time with difference from UTC:

2016-W27-4T21:18:22+03:00 (extended format)
2016W274T211822+0300 (basic format)

All of the above representations represent the same date and time of day in local time with difference from UTC (and instant). If an API documents that it accepts an ISO 8601 date with time of day and a zone designator (aka known as a complete representation), it should accept all of the above representations to be compliant with ISO 8601.

Update 2:

Most bugs i have encountered stem from using strftime() to output an ISO 8601 date and time of day in local time with difference from UTC in extended format. The standard strftime() can only output compliant representations in basic format due to the limitations in the z conversion specifier:

Combination of calendar date and time of day in local time with difference from UTC:

Format:          Example:
%Y%m%dT%H%M%S%z  20160707T211822+0300

Combination of ordinal date and time of day in local time with difference from UTC:

Basic format:    Example:
%Y%jT%H%M%S%z    2016189T211822+0300

Combination of week date and time of day in local time with difference from UTC:

Basic format:    Example:
%GW%V%uT%H%M%S%z 2016W274T211822+0300

The GNU strftime implementation supports a : flag between the percent and the z conversion specifier to specify that the zone designator should be formated in extended format:

Combination of calendar date and time of day in local time with difference from UTC:

Format:                Example:
%Y-%m-%dT%H:%M:%S%:z   2016-07-07T21:18:22+03:00

Combination of ordinal date and time of day in local time with difference from UTC:

Format:                Example:
%Y-%jT%H:%M:%S%:z      2016-189T21:18:22+03:00

Combination of week date and time of day in local time with difference from UTC:

Format:                Example:
%G-W%V-%uT%H:%M:%S%:z  2016-W27-4T21:18:22+03:00
4
  • so what should the second one be to make it correct?
    – Simba
    Jul 12 '16 at 9:26
  • Okay. Thanks for the update. So I guess the corollary question is why is PHP outputting a format that is incorrect? (and also according to the OP, some bank systems?) Has it been reported to them?
    – Simba
    Jul 12 '16 at 11:36
  • 2
    @Simba PHP has documented that DateTime::ISO8601 is not compliant with ISO 8601, the documentation states that DateTime::ATOM should be used.
    – chansen
    Jul 12 '16 at 17:39
  • Thank you Chansen. DateTime::ISO8601 is for backward compatibility reasons. My Estonian Swedbank use this format although in the documentation write that used ISO8601 format.
    – DimaS
    Jul 12 '16 at 18:49

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