177

Yes is a most frequent question, and this matter is vague for me and since I don't know much about it.

But i would like a very precise way to find a files Encoding. So precise as Notepad++ is.

7

12 Answers 12

190

The StreamReader.CurrentEncoding property rarely returns the correct text file encoding for me. I've had greater success determining a file's endianness, by analyzing its byte order mark (BOM). If the file does not have a BOM, this cannot determine the file's encoding.

*UPDATED 4/08/2020 to include UTF-32LE detection and return correct encoding for UTF-32BE

/// <summary>
/// Determines a text file's encoding by analyzing its byte order mark (BOM).
/// Defaults to ASCII when detection of the text file's endianness fails.
/// </summary>
/// <param name="filename">The text file to analyze.</param>
/// <returns>The detected encoding.</returns>
public static Encoding GetEncoding(string filename)
{
    // Read the BOM
    var bom = new byte[4];
    using (var file = new FileStream(filename, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read))
    {
        file.Read(bom, 0, 4);
    }

    // Analyze the BOM
    if (bom[0] == 0x2b && bom[1] == 0x2f && bom[2] == 0x76) return Encoding.UTF7;
    if (bom[0] == 0xef && bom[1] == 0xbb && bom[2] == 0xbf) return Encoding.UTF8;
    if (bom[0] == 0xff && bom[1] == 0xfe && bom[2] == 0 && bom[3] == 0) return Encoding.UTF32; //UTF-32LE
    if (bom[0] == 0xff && bom[1] == 0xfe) return Encoding.Unicode; //UTF-16LE
    if (bom[0] == 0xfe && bom[1] == 0xff) return Encoding.BigEndianUnicode; //UTF-16BE
    if (bom[0] == 0 && bom[1] == 0 && bom[2] == 0xfe && bom[3] == 0xff) return new UTF32Encoding(true, true);  //UTF-32BE

    // We actually have no idea what the encoding is if we reach this point, so
    // you may wish to return null instead of defaulting to ASCII
    return Encoding.ASCII;
}
17
  • 3
    +1. This worked for me too (whereas detectEncodingFromByteOrderMarks did not). I used "new FileStream(filename, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read)" to avoid a IOException because the file is read only.
    – Polyfun
    Commented Apr 7, 2014 at 15:18
  • 76
    UTF-8 files can be without BOM, in this case it will return ASCII incorrectly.
    – user626528
    Commented Dec 22, 2014 at 2:54
  • 8
    This answer is wrong. Looking at the reference source for StreamReader, that implementation is what more people will want. They make new encodings rather than using the existing Encoding.Unicode objects, so equality checks will fail (which might rarely happen anyway because, for instance, Encoding.UTF8 can return different objects), but it (1) doesn't use the really weird UTF-7 format, (2) defaults to UTF-8 if no BOM is found, and (3) can be overridden to use a different default encoding.
    – hangar
    Commented Dec 17, 2015 at 18:08
  • 7
    i had better success with new StreamReader(filename, true).CurrentEncoding
    – Benoit
    Commented Mar 10, 2016 at 8:22
  • 4
    There is a fundamental error in the code; when you detect the big-endian UTF32 signature (00 00 FE FF), you return the system-provided Encoding.UTF32, which is a little-endian encoding (as noted here). And also, as noted by @Nyerguds, you still are not looking for UTF32LE, which has signature FF FE 00 00 (according to en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byte_order_mark). As that user noted, because it is subsuming, that check must come before the 2-byte checks. Commented Feb 8, 2018 at 2:11
79

The following code works fine for me, using the StreamReader class:

  using (var reader = new StreamReader(fileName, defaultEncodingIfNoBom, true))
  {
      reader.Peek(); // you need this!
      var encoding = reader.CurrentEncoding;
  }

The trick is to use the Peek call, otherwise, .NET has not done anything (and it hasn't read the preamble, the BOM). Of course, if you use any other ReadXXX call before checking the encoding, it works too.

If the file has no BOM, then the defaultEncodingIfNoBom encoding will be used. There is also a StreamReader constructor overload without this argument (in this case, the encoding will by default be set to UTF8 before any read), but I recommend to define what you consider the default encoding in your context.

I have tested this successfully with files with BOM for UTF8, UTF16/Unicode (LE & BE) and UTF32 (LE & BE). It does not work for UTF7.

14
  • 1
    I get back what set as default encoding. Could I be missing momething?
    – Ram
    Commented Mar 15, 2016 at 9:28
  • 1
    @DRAM - this can happen if the file has no BOM Commented Mar 15, 2016 at 14:31
  • 2
    In powershell I had to run $reader.close(), or else it was locked from writing. foreach($filename in $args) { $reader = [System.IO.StreamReader]::new($filename, [System.Text.Encoding]::default,$true); $peek = $reader.Peek(); $reader.currentencoding | select bodyname,encodingname; $reader.close() }
    – js2010
    Commented Apr 10, 2019 at 21:53
  • 2
    @SimonMourier This does not work if encoding of the file is UTF-8 without BOM
    – Ozkan
    Commented Apr 29, 2019 at 8:09
  • 1
    @Ozkan - If there's no BOM, you can't guarantee 100% what a file encoding is. That's why I added a defaultEncodingIfNoBom parameter in my sample code. It's up to you to decide what that could be depending on your context. It's often UTF-8 these days. Commented Apr 29, 2019 at 8:21
18

Check this.

UDE

This is a port of Mozilla Universal Charset Detector and you can use it like this...

public static void Main(String[] args)
{
    string filename = args[0];
    using (FileStream fs = File.OpenRead(filename)) {
        Ude.CharsetDetector cdet = new Ude.CharsetDetector();
        cdet.Feed(fs);
        cdet.DataEnd();
        if (cdet.Charset != null) {
            Console.WriteLine("Charset: {0}, confidence: {1}", 
                 cdet.Charset, cdet.Confidence);
        } else {
            Console.WriteLine("Detection failed.");
        }
    }
}
6
  • 1
    You should know that UDE is GPL
    – lindexi
    Commented Nov 27, 2017 at 7:53
  • 2
    Ok if you are worried about the license then you can use this one. Licensed as MIT and you can use it for both open source and closed source software. nuget.org/packages/SimpleHelpers.FileEncoding Commented Nov 28, 2017 at 13:38
  • The license is MPL with a GPL option. The library is subject to the Mozilla Public License Version 1.1 (the "License"). Alternatively, it may be used under the terms of either the GNU General Public License Version 2 or later (the "GPL"), or the GNU Lesser General Public License Version 2.1 or later (the "LGPL").
    – jbtule
    Commented Jun 10, 2019 at 20:59
  • 1
    It appears this fork is currently the most active and has a nuget package UDE.Netstandard. github.com/yinyue200/ude
    – jbtule
    Commented Jun 10, 2019 at 21:09
  • 1
    That's nice but I refuse to believe a bloated library is needed for something so simple. Commented Aug 7, 2020 at 14:18
18

Providing the implementation details for the steps proposed by @CodesInChaos:

1) Check if there is a Byte Order Mark

2) Check if the file is valid UTF8

3) Use the local "ANSI" codepage (ANSI as Microsoft defines it)

Step 2 works because most non ASCII sequences in codepages other that UTF8 are not valid UTF8. https://stackoverflow.com/a/4522251/867248 explains the tactic in more details.

using System; using System.IO; using System.Text;

// Using encoding from BOM or UTF8 if no BOM found,
// check if the file is valid, by reading all lines
// If decoding fails, use the local "ANSI" codepage

public string DetectFileEncoding(Stream fileStream)
{
    var Utf8EncodingVerifier = Encoding.GetEncoding("utf-8", new EncoderExceptionFallback(), new DecoderExceptionFallback());
    using (var reader = new StreamReader(fileStream, Utf8EncodingVerifier,
           detectEncodingFromByteOrderMarks: true, leaveOpen: true, bufferSize: 1024))
    {
        string detectedEncoding;
        try
        {
            while (!reader.EndOfStream)
            {
                var line = reader.ReadLine();
            }
            detectedEncoding = reader.CurrentEncoding.BodyName;
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
            // Failed to decode the file using the BOM/UT8. 
            // Assume it's local ANSI
            detectedEncoding = "ISO-8859-1";
        }
        // Rewind the stream
        fileStream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);
        return detectedEncoding;
   }
}


[Test]
public void Test1()
{
    Stream fs = File.OpenRead(@".\TestData\TextFile_ansi.csv");
    var detectedEncoding = DetectFileEncoding(fs);

    using (var reader = new StreamReader(fs, Encoding.GetEncoding(detectedEncoding)))
    {
       // Consume your file
        var line = reader.ReadLine();
        ...
5
  • 1
    Thank you! This solved for me. But I would prefer use just reader.Peek() instead of while (!reader.EndOfStream) { var line = reader.ReadLine(); } Commented Feb 6, 2019 at 11:46
  • reader.Peek() doesn't read the whole stream. I found that with larger streams, Peek() was inadequate. I used reader.ReadToEndAsync() instead. Commented Apr 25, 2019 at 14:54
  • And what is Utf8EncodingVerifier? Commented Aug 7, 2020 at 14:19
  • 2
    @PeterMoore Its an encoding for utf8, var Utf8EncodingVerifier = Encoding.GetEncoding("utf-8", new EncoderExceptionFallback(), new DecoderExceptionFallback()); It is used in the try block when reading a line. If the encoder fails to parse the provided text (the text is not encoded with utf8), Utf8EncodingVerifier will throw. The exception is catched and we then know the text is not utf8, and default to ISO-8859-1 Commented Aug 9, 2020 at 16:56
  • I'm getting an exception with "Unable to translate bytes [E9] at index 313 from specified code page to Unicode." when using this code on an easy ANSI file.
    – PHenry
    Commented Jun 16, 2021 at 20:46
12

I'd try the following steps:

1) Check if there is a Byte Order Mark

2) Check if the file is valid UTF8

3) Use the local "ANSI" codepage (ANSI as Microsoft defines it)

Step 2 works because most non ASCII sequences in codepages other that UTF8 are not valid UTF8.

8
  • This seems like the more correct answer, as the other answer does not work for me. One can do it with File.OpenRead and .Read-ing the first few bytes of the file.
    – user420667
    Commented Aug 12, 2013 at 23:07
  • 2
    Step 2 is a whole bunch of programming work to check the bit patterns, though.
    – Nyerguds
    Commented Mar 17, 2016 at 8:15
  • 1
    I'm not sure decoding actually throws exceptions though, or if it just replaces the unrecognized sequences with '?'. I went with writing a bit pattern checking class, anyway.
    – Nyerguds
    Commented Mar 17, 2016 at 8:23
  • 4
    When you create an instance of Utf8Encoding you can pass in an extra parameter that determines if an exception should be thrown or if you prefer silent data corruption. Commented Mar 17, 2016 at 9:10
  • 1
    I like this answer. Most encodings (like 99% of your uses cases probably) will be either UTF-8 or ANSI (Windows codepage 1252). You can check if the string contains the replacement character (0xFFFD) to determine if the encoding failed.
    – marsze
    Commented Jan 18, 2017 at 9:05
9

.NET is not very helpful, but you can try the following algorithm:

  1. try to find the encoding by BOM(byte order mark) ... very likely not to be found
  2. try parsing into different encodings

Here is the call:

var encoding = FileHelper.GetEncoding(filePath);
if (encoding == null)
    throw new Exception("The file encoding is not supported. Please choose one of the following encodings: UTF8/UTF7/iso-8859-1");

Here is the code:

public class FileHelper
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Determines a text file's encoding by analyzing its byte order mark (BOM) and if not found try parsing into diferent encodings       
    /// Defaults to UTF8 when detection of the text file's endianness fails.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="filename">The text file to analyze.</param>
    /// <returns>The detected encoding or null.</returns>
    public static Encoding GetEncoding(string filename)
    {
        var encodingByBOM = GetEncodingByBOM(filename);
        if (encodingByBOM != null)
            return encodingByBOM;

        // BOM not found :(, so try to parse characters into several encodings
        var encodingByParsingUTF8 = GetEncodingByParsing(filename, Encoding.UTF8);
        if (encodingByParsingUTF8 != null)
            return encodingByParsingUTF8;

        var encodingByParsingLatin1 = GetEncodingByParsing(filename, Encoding.GetEncoding("iso-8859-1"));
        if (encodingByParsingLatin1 != null)
            return encodingByParsingLatin1;

        var encodingByParsingUTF7 = GetEncodingByParsing(filename, Encoding.UTF7);
        if (encodingByParsingUTF7 != null)
            return encodingByParsingUTF7;

        return null;   // no encoding found
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Determines a text file's encoding by analyzing its byte order mark (BOM)  
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="filename">The text file to analyze.</param>
    /// <returns>The detected encoding.</returns>
    private static Encoding GetEncodingByBOM(string filename)
    {
        // Read the BOM
        var byteOrderMark = new byte[4];
        using (var file = new FileStream(filename, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read))
        {
            file.Read(byteOrderMark, 0, 4);
        }

        // Analyze the BOM
        if (byteOrderMark[0] == 0x2b && byteOrderMark[1] == 0x2f && byteOrderMark[2] == 0x76) return Encoding.UTF7;
        if (byteOrderMark[0] == 0xef && byteOrderMark[1] == 0xbb && byteOrderMark[2] == 0xbf) return Encoding.UTF8;
        if (byteOrderMark[0] == 0xff && byteOrderMark[1] == 0xfe) return Encoding.Unicode; //UTF-16LE
        if (byteOrderMark[0] == 0xfe && byteOrderMark[1] == 0xff) return Encoding.BigEndianUnicode; //UTF-16BE
        if (byteOrderMark[0] == 0 && byteOrderMark[1] == 0 && byteOrderMark[2] == 0xfe && byteOrderMark[3] == 0xff) return Encoding.UTF32;

        return null;    // no BOM found
    }

    private static Encoding GetEncodingByParsing(string filename, Encoding encoding)
    {            
        var encodingVerifier = Encoding.GetEncoding(encoding.BodyName, new EncoderExceptionFallback(), new DecoderExceptionFallback());

        try
        {
            using (var textReader = new StreamReader(filename, encodingVerifier, detectEncodingFromByteOrderMarks: true))
            {
                while (!textReader.EndOfStream)
                {                        
                    textReader.ReadLine();   // in order to increment the stream position
                }

                // all text parsed ok
                return textReader.CurrentEncoding;
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex) { }

        return null;    // 
    }
}
7

The solution proposed by @nonoandy is really interesting, I have succesfully tested it and seems to be working perfectly.

The nuget package needed is Microsoft.ProgramSynthesis.Detection (version 8.17.0 at the moment)

I suggest to use the EncodingTypeUtils.GetDotNetName instead of using a switch for getting the Encoding instance:

using System.Text;
using Microsoft.ProgramSynthesis.Detection.Encoding;

...

public Encoding? DetectEncoding(Stream stream)
{
    try
    {
        if (stream.CanSeek)
        {
            // Read from the beginning if possible
            stream.Seek(0, SeekOrigin.Begin);
        }

        // Detect encoding type (enum)
        var encodingType = EncodingIdentifier.IdentifyEncoding(stream);
        
        // Get the corresponding encoding name to be passed to System.Text.Encoding.GetEncoding
        var encodingDotNetName = EncodingTypeUtils.GetDotNetName(encodingType);

        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(encodingDotNetName))
        {
            return Encoding.GetEncoding(encodingDotNetName);
        }
    }
    catch (Exception e)
    {
        // Handle exception (log, throw, etc...)
    }

    // In case of error return null or a default value
    return null;
}
1
  • Microsoft.ProgramSynthesis.Detection.Encoding's license for today's current NuGet package 9.0.0 specifies "non-commercial" use. Check it out before using.
    – Super Jade
    Commented Jul 15 at 22:59
4

Look here for c#

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.io.streamreader.currentencoding%28v=vs.110%29.aspx

string path = @"path\to\your\file.ext";

using (StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(path, true))
{
    while (sr.Peek() >= 0)
    {
        Console.Write((char)sr.Read());
    }

    //Test for the encoding after reading, or at least
    //after the first read.
    Console.WriteLine("The encoding used was {0}.", sr.CurrentEncoding);
    Console.ReadLine();
    Console.WriteLine();
}
1

The following codes are my Powershell codes to determinate if some cpp or h or ml files are encodeding with ISO-8859-1(Latin-1) or UTF-8 without BOM, if neither then suppose it to be GB18030. I am a Chinese working in France and MSVC saves as Latin-1 on french computer and saves as GB on Chinese computer so this helps me avoid encoding problem when do source file exchanges between my system and my colleagues.

The way is simple, if all characters are between x00-x7E, ASCII, UTF-8 and Latin-1 are all the same, but if I read a non ASCII file by UTF-8, we will find the special character � show up, so try to read with Latin-1. In Latin-1, between \x7F and \xAF is empty, while GB uses full between x00-xFF so if I got any between the two, it's not Latin-1

The code is written in PowerShell, but uses .net so it's easy to be translated into C# or F#

$Utf8NoBomEncoding = New-Object System.Text.UTF8Encoding($False)
foreach($i in Get-ChildItem .\ -Recurse -include *.cpp,*.h, *.ml) {
    $openUTF = New-Object System.IO.StreamReader -ArgumentList ($i, [Text.Encoding]::UTF8)
    $contentUTF = $openUTF.ReadToEnd()
    [regex]$regex = '�'
    $c=$regex.Matches($contentUTF).count
    $openUTF.Close()
    if ($c -ne 0) {
        $openLatin1 = New-Object System.IO.StreamReader -ArgumentList ($i, [Text.Encoding]::GetEncoding('ISO-8859-1'))
        $contentLatin1 = $openLatin1.ReadToEnd()
        $openLatin1.Close()
        [regex]$regex = '[\x7F-\xAF]'
        $c=$regex.Matches($contentLatin1).count
        if ($c -eq 0) {
            [System.IO.File]::WriteAllLines($i, $contentLatin1, $Utf8NoBomEncoding)
            $i.FullName
        } 
        else {
            $openGB = New-Object System.IO.StreamReader -ArgumentList ($i, [Text.Encoding]::GetEncoding('GB18030'))
            $contentGB = $openGB.ReadToEnd()
            $openGB.Close()
            [System.IO.File]::WriteAllLines($i, $contentGB, $Utf8NoBomEncoding)
            $i.FullName
        }
    }
}
Write-Host -NoNewLine 'Press any key to continue...';
$null = $Host.UI.RawUI.ReadKey('NoEcho,IncludeKeyDown');
1

This seems to work well.

First create a helper method:

  private static Encoding TestCodePage(Encoding testCode, byte[] byteArray)
    {
      try
      {
        var encoding = Encoding.GetEncoding(testCode.CodePage, EncoderFallback.ExceptionFallback, DecoderFallback.ExceptionFallback);
        var a = encoding.GetCharCount(byteArray);
        return testCode;
      }
      catch (Exception e)
      {
        return null;
      }
    }

Then create code to test the source. In this case, I've got a byte array I need to get the encoding of:

 public static Encoding DetectCodePage(byte[] contents)
    {
      if (contents == null || contents.Length == 0)
      {
        return Encoding.Default;
      }

      return TestCodePage(Encoding.UTF8, contents)
             ?? TestCodePage(Encoding.Unicode, contents)
             ?? TestCodePage(Encoding.BigEndianUnicode, contents)
             ?? TestCodePage(Encoding.GetEncoding(1252), contents) // Western European
             ?? TestCodePage(Encoding.GetEncoding(28591), contents) // ISO Western European
             ?? TestCodePage(Encoding.ASCII, contents)
             ?? TestCodePage(Encoding.Default, contents); // likely Unicode
    }
2
  • Hmmm... this returns Unicode for me when the file is ANSI
    – komodosp
    Commented Oct 11, 2021 at 9:33
  • @colmde Let us know if you were able to solve the issue! Commented Nov 19, 2021 at 17:26
0

I have tried a few different ways to detect encoding and hit issues with most of them.

I made the following leveraging a Microsoft Nuget Package and it seems to work for me so far but needs tested a lot more.
Most of my testing has been on UTF8, UTF8 with BOM and ANSI.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var path = Directory.GetCurrentDirectory() + "\\TextFile2.txt";
    List<string> contents = File.ReadLines(path, GetEncoding(path)).Where(w => !string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(w)).ToList();

    int i = 0;
    foreach (var line in contents)
    {
        i++;
        Console.WriteLine(line);
        if (i > 100)
            break;
    }

}


public static Encoding GetEncoding(string filename)
{
    using (var file = new FileStream(filename, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read))
    {
        var detectedEncoding = Microsoft.ProgramSynthesis.Detection.Encoding.EncodingIdentifier.IdentifyEncoding(file);
        switch (detectedEncoding)
        {
            case Microsoft.ProgramSynthesis.Detection.Encoding.EncodingType.Utf8:
                return Encoding.UTF8;
            case Microsoft.ProgramSynthesis.Detection.Encoding.EncodingType.Utf16Be:
                return Encoding.BigEndianUnicode;
            case Microsoft.ProgramSynthesis.Detection.Encoding.EncodingType.Utf16Le:
                return Encoding.Unicode;
            case Microsoft.ProgramSynthesis.Detection.Encoding.EncodingType.Utf32Le:
                return Encoding.UTF32;
            case Microsoft.ProgramSynthesis.Detection.Encoding.EncodingType.Ascii:
                return Encoding.ASCII;
            case Microsoft.ProgramSynthesis.Detection.Encoding.EncodingType.Iso88591:
            case Microsoft.ProgramSynthesis.Detection.Encoding.EncodingType.Unknown:
            case Microsoft.ProgramSynthesis.Detection.Encoding.EncodingType.Windows1252:
            default:
            return Encoding.Default;
        }
    }
}
1
  • Microsoft.ProgramSynthesis.Detection.Encoding's license for today's current NuGet package 9.0.0 specifies "non-commercial" use. Check it out before using.
    – Super Jade
    Commented Jul 15 at 23:00
-3

It may be useful

string path = @"address/to/the/file.extension";

using (StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(path))
{ 
    Console.WriteLine(sr.CurrentEncoding);                        
}
1
  • 1
    Regardless of the encoding of a file, this always evaluates to UTF-8, at least on my environment. Commented Jan 10, 2022 at 7:39

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