2

TLDR; My question is different from PHP. Is it possible to use array_column with an array of objects. I want to only change the keys within the array and keep the objects, not having the objects' values stored in a separate array like the given answer.

I would like to set the keys, of an array with objects, to a value of the object. So this array:

$array = Array
(
    [0] => stdClass Object
        (
            [id] = 12234
            [value] = some value
        )

    [1] => stdClass Object
        (
            [id] = 12994
            [value] = some value
        )

)

Should become:

$array = Array
(
    [12234] => stdClass Object
        (
            [id] = 12234
            [value] = some value
        )

    [12994] => stdClass Object
        (
            [id] = 12994
            [value] = some value
        )

)

Now I could loop over the array, but I would prefer a more cleaner solution. I thought this should work:

$newArray = array_column($array, null, 'id');

The only problem is I'm having an array of objects instead of an array of arrays and I'm not using PHP7 yet. Now I found a similar question over here PHP. Is it possible to use array_column with an array of objects

But the thing is it doesn't return what I expected. Cause this:

$newArray = array_map(function($o) {
        return is_object($o) ? $o->id : $o['id'];
    }, $array);

Returns

Array
(
    [0] => 12234
    [1] => 12994
)

Anyone who knows a clean solution (so without a for or foreach loop) for this?

2
  • What's your question? I showed my current array and how I would prefer it to be. And I showed you what I tried and what didn't work, so what do you need more exactly if I may ask? – Erik van de Ven Jul 8 '16 at 10:04
  • 1
    @Oyeme did you even read? I already mentioned that link and why that answer didn't work for me.... – Erik van de Ven Jul 8 '16 at 10:08
7
$array = array_combine(array_map(function ($o) { return $o->id; }, $array), $array);

Whether this is really a lot better than a simple foreach loop, aside from "but, but, functional programming...!", is debatable.

3
  • Well it sure does look a lot cleaner to me ;), and it works perfectly. Thanks a lot! – Erik van de Ven Jul 8 '16 at 10:12
  • 2
    Do note that this is probably a lot slower than a foreach, due to incurring function call overhead, temporary values and multiple iterations instead of one. It probably doesn't matter much at all to the bottomline, but be aware nonetheless. – deceze Jul 8 '16 at 10:15
  • Alright, good to know! Thanks for the info :) – Erik van de Ven Jul 8 '16 at 10:17
1
// your data

$array = array(
    (object) array(
        "id" => "12234", 
        "value" => "some value", 
        ),
    (object) array(
        "id" => "12235", 
        "value" => "some value", 
        ),
    (object) array(
        "id" => "12236", 
        "value" => "some value", 
        ), 
    );

// let's see what we have

print_r($array);


// here comes the magic ;-)

function key_flip_array($array, $keyname){
    $keys = array_map(function($item, $keyname){
        return (is_object($item) && isset($item->{$keyname}) ? $item->{$keyname} : (is_array($item) && isset($item[$keyname]) ? $item[$keyname] : null));
        }, $array, array_fill(0, count($array), $keyname));

    return array_combine($keys, $array);
    }


$array = key_flip_array($array, "id");

// i hope this is what you wish to see

print_r($array);

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