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Consider the code snippet below:

function isUniform(myArray) {
    myArray.forEach(function(element) {
        if (element !== myArray[0]) {
            return false;
        }
    });

    return true;
}

The intention is that the function should take an array as input and return true if all the elements in the array are the same and false otherwise.

eg:

isUniform([1,2,1,1]); // should return false isUniform([1,1,1,1]); // should return true

However, the if condition:

if (element !== myArray[0])

never seem to be true in the case of isUniform([1,2,1,1]).

What is it that I am missing ?

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  • 3
    why are you using return in a forEach()? that doesn't makes sense because forEach() doesn't return... Use [].some() and return the some() call, or do the extra iteration and a closure var and stick with forEach...
    – dandavis
    Jul 8, 2016 at 19:24
  • @dandavis: Thanks!. Getting started with JS! Jul 8, 2016 at 19:26
  • 1
    well, it's good to see new comers use forEach instead of for(, you're on the right track.
    – dandavis
    Jul 8, 2016 at 19:27
  • @dandavis So the only purpose of forEach is to perform side effects on its Array? Haven't used it. Won't use it.
    – user6445533
    Jul 8, 2016 at 19:32
  • you can use the 2nd argument to [].forEach to inject a destination object instead of using side-effects, but few people use that, opting instead for [].map/[].some/[].each/[].filter
    – dandavis
    Jul 8, 2016 at 19:33

1 Answer 1

9

So the return true isn't returning a value for the function isUniform, it's returning a value for the callback that you provided to the forEach method. forEach is really only used to create side effects. So forEach executes the callback on each element, sees that the callback returns false, but then doesn't have anything to do with that value, so it throws it out and moves on to the next element in the array. After iterating through the array, it moves on to the next line of code and returns true for the function.

One way that you might do this using forEach is to declare a variable that you initialize as true and manipulate that within the callback. This is necessary, as there's not a way to end the execution of a forEach loop early. So you might instead use:

function isUniform(myArray) {
    var passing = true;
    myArray.forEach(function(element) {
        if (element !== myArray[0]) {
            passing = false;
        }
    });

    return passing;
}

Or you could use a for loop or a for-of loop, in which case the return statement would work as you had originally expected. You're probably already familiar with for loops. For-of loops were introduced in ES2015 (so they might not work on all JS engines). A for-of loop would look like this:

function isUniform(myArray) {
    for (element of myArray) {
        if (element !== myArray[0]) {
            return false
        }
    }
    return true
}

However, the best way to do this is probably using the built in array method every, which returns true if every element in the array passes the test provided in the callback. So you might test every element to see if they're equal to the 0th element in the array and thus equal to each other:

function isUniform(myArray) {
    return myArray.every(function (currentElement,index,array) {
        return currentElement === array[0]
    })
}

That's short enough that you really don't even need to put it in its own function -- and your code will probably be more readable if you don't.

Docs: Array.prototype.every: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Array/every

For-of loop: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Statements/for...of

6
  • @dandavis You're referring to the array.every() block? I'm pretty confident that it works fine, and I've tested it in a repl. What circumstances did you get it to fail under?
    – svangordon
    Jul 8, 2016 at 19:58
  • wow, i'm just all kinds of dumb today. you're right, it's fine and i should read the code (function names included) more next time. sorry about the confusion.
    – dandavis
    Jul 8, 2016 at 20:01
  • Please, use arrows: const isUniform = xs => xs.every(x => x === xs[0])
    – user6445533
    Jul 8, 2016 at 20:04
  • 1
    @LUH3417 Arrow functions aren't supported everywhere, at least not yet. I figured that if the asker doesn't understand why this bit of code doesn't work, they probably don't understand lambdas. But yes, I certainly agree that arrow fn's would make this easier to read and write
    – svangordon
    Jul 8, 2016 at 20:10
  • 1
    @LUH3417 First of all, I wrote the code to help the asker better understand JS. It's not like I'm going to ship this tomorrow, and then have to support it in the future. This is a trivial problem, with a trivial example. Furthermore, it's not like this code is going to break. One of the principles of Ecma is "Don't break the web". Just because ES6 has introduced syntactic sugar doesn't mean that older syntax is deprecated or doesn't work. In fact, there are plenty of places where ES6 features, like lambdas, won't work without transpiling, like older Node versions or older web browsers.
    – svangordon
    Jul 10, 2016 at 18:28

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