I hope this is not a repeated question-- though I couldn't find much help on this.

I am practicing recursive functions (I'm a newbie), and I'm trying to multiply each number in an array. Sort of like a factorial. I have this code, but it is only returning undefined as a result.

Here is the code:

 var stack = [];

function countDown(int) {
  stack.push(int);
  if (int === 1) {  
    return 1;
  }
    return countDown(int - 1);
}

function multiplyEach() {
  // Remove the last value of the stack 
  // and assign it to the variable int
  int = stack.pop();
  x = stack.length;
  // Base case
  if ( x === 0 ) {
    return;
  }
  // Recursive case
  else {
    stack[int - 1] = int * stack[x - 1];
    return multiplyEach(int);
  }
}

// Call the function countDown(7)
countDown(7);
// And then print out the value returned by multiplyEach()
console.log(multiplyEach());

Thank you so much for any insight.

Cheers!

  • First of all, don't use global state as var stack. And you shouldn't use your own stack structure either, unless you have to (see my answer) – ftor Jul 9 '16 at 10:25
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The first thing to address is that your multiplyEach() function should have a parameter named int, from the looks of it. The approach you're using might be better suited to a different technique, but we'll get to that.

Next, in multiplyEach(), there are two possible paths:

  1. The stack still has elements, in which case we multiply the new top value on the stack by the old one and move on to another run of multiplyEach.

  2. The stack is empty, and we just return.

The problem here is that we aren't actually returning the final stack value, or leaving it on there to access later. We've effectively lost it, so what is the function outputting?

In many languages, we would have defined a return type for this function, either void for no value, or int for returning the multiplied value. However, in Javascript, there is no such thing as a function that doesn't return a value; "nothing" in JS is represented as undefined. When you return multiplyEach(), you're pushing another call of it onto the call stack, and waiting for an actual return value... which ends up being return;, which JS interprets as return undefined;. Again, in most languages, there would be some form of error, but not in JS! Let's look at two possible implementations:

  1. The custom stack you use:

    // your stack is fine, so we'll skip to the meat
    function multiplyEach() {
        var int = stack.pop(), x = stack.length;
        stack[x - 1] *= int;
        if(x < 2) // to multiply, we need at least two numbers left
            return;
        multiplyEach();
    }
    
    //...
    multiplyEach();
    console.log(stack[0]);
    
  2. With a parameter, and using a list:

    function multiplyEach(index) {
        var int = list[index];
        if(index == 0)
            return int;
        return int * multiplyEach(index - 1);
    }
    
    //...
    console.log(multiplyEach(list.length - 1));
    

They're both different ways of implementing this recursively; all recursion inherently requires is for a function to call itself. Another possibility would have been having a parameter store the total, instead of multiplying the return values like in option 2; that's called tail recursion.

EDIT: noticed the base case for option 1 was in the wrong place, so I moved it. It should work now.

  • This was really helpful! Thank you for your time. – Christopher L.Nash Jul 9 '16 at 5:52

Recursively you can do this way:

function multiplyEach(arr, size) {
  return size === 0 ? arr[size] : arr[size] * multiplyEach(arr, size - 1);
}

var array = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9];
console.log(multiplyEach(array, array.length - 1));

But you can do it using the native method reduce, then you could do simply this:

console.log([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9].reduce(function(a, b) { return a * b; }));

ES6 version:

console.log([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9].reduce((a, b) => a * b));

I hope it helps.

There are times recursion is better suited to solve a problem and there are times iteration is better suited to solve a problem.

Recursion is better suited for performing an action until a condition is met then exiting, similar to a while loop.

Iteration is better suited for performing an action N number of times then exiting, similar to a for loop.

In our case, we want to input an array and output the product of all elements of that array. In other word, we want to perform N - 1 multiplications where N is the number of elements in the array. Since we know the number of operations we want to perform we should solve our problem with iteration which is done below.

var arr = [1, 2, 3]
var result = multiplyEach(arr)
console.log(result)
// -> 6

function multiplyEach(arr) {
    var result = 1
    arr.map(function(value) {
        result *= value
    })
    return result
}     

Keep in mind though that the above is an approximate rule of thumb because sometimes recursion will be a more elegant solution than iteration. Here's the simple, recursive, and elegant implementation of the real factorial.

function factorial(value) {
    return 1 === value ? 1 : value * factorial(value - 1)
}

The iterative implementation of factorial is not as pretty in while loop form nor for loop form.

function factorial(value) {
    var result = 1
    while (value > 0) {
        result *= value
        value--
    }
    return result
}

function factorial(value) {
    var result = 1
    for (var i = 0; i < value; i++) {
        result *= value
    }
    return result
}
  • 1
    Nice comparison of concepts. Two remarks: 1) map under the hood is either implemented as a loop or recursively. That means map is an abstraction of loops, whereas recursion is a complete replacement of them (actually recursion is more expressive than loops) 2) Your factorial is naive, because it isn't tail recursive and thus will blow up the stack inevitably. – ftor Jul 9 '16 at 11:44

I think the main issue is that you do not have an argument in the multiplyEach() definition, but you attempt to call it with one inside the function.

Something like this works:

var stack = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7];

function multiplyEach(arr) {
  if (arr.length == 0) {
    return 1;
  } else {
    return arr.pop() * multiplyEach(arr);
  }
}
console.log(multiplyEach(stack));
  • Thank you for your insight! – Christopher L.Nash Jul 9 '16 at 5:51
  • This implementation would likely yield unwanted results as applying the function twice on the same array would yield different results as JS uses pass by reference for all objects being passed to functions – Ethan Davis Jul 9 '16 at 10:36
  • Thanks, but it works on Chrome (not for arbitrarily-sized arrays, of course…). It's not calling the function with the same array twice because I pop() an element for each call of the function. Right? – Quasifredo Jul 11 '16 at 2:42

The base case in the recursive function multiplyEach() returns undefined.

That's where your problem lies.

A simple fix would be:

var stack = [];
var multipliedStack = [];

function countDown(int) {
  stack.push(int);
  if (int === 1) {  
    return 1;
  }
    return countDown(int - 1);
}

function multiplyEach() {
  // Remove the last value of the stack 
  // and assign it to the variable int
  int = stack.pop();
  x = stack.length;
  // Base case
  if ( x === 0 ) {
    return multipliedStack.reverse();
  }
  // Recursive case
  else {
    multipliedStack.push(int * stack[x - 1]);
    return multiplyEach(int);
  }
}

// Call the function countDown(7)
countDown(7);
// And then print out the value returned by multiplyEach()
console.log(multiplyEach());

I don't fully get what you mean by "sort of like a factorial"? What exactly is the function supposed to do?

To understand recursion you need to wrap your head around what a recursive base case is and also I think you need to revise push() and pop() which are not used in a proper way in your code.

Recursive functions are usually abit confusing if you are used to iteration, keep trying and you'll get comfortable with it rather quick.

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