281

How do I get the current date/time in seconds in Javascript?

11 Answers 11

431
var seconds = new Date().getTime() / 1000;

....will give you the seconds since midnight, 1 Jan 1970

Reference

  • 11
    While this is accurate, when would it ever be useful? :) – Nick Craver Sep 30 '10 at 11:58
  • 6
    @Nick - I think all examples are necessarily speculative and will sound contrived - but I'll take a shot :) Suppose you have data time stamped with unix time, and want to determine it's age. More though I think this is what is most likely meant by 'the current date/time in seconds'; just my gut feeling. – sje397 Sep 30 '10 at 12:10
  • 3
    An application where I needed this was to work with a PHP back end as the time() function already returns this. It's also great for a time stamp as you can easily get the difference between time() being our current time and a time stamp from a previous time that had been stored in a database say when a user posted something. In the event you'd like to get a formatted time like 'October 22nd, 2015' you can craft your own function to return that from a timestamp as an argument or use one already here at Stack. Anyways, hope that gives you some insight as to when this would be useful. @NickCraver – uhfocuz Oct 22 '15 at 19:23
  • 19
    It's worth noting that you want to wrap that in Math.floor(), else you get a decimal. – David Webber Feb 12 '16 at 18:43
  • 10
    One way this would be useful would be calculating the time elapsed between two times. – Zac Jun 12 '16 at 20:22
99
 Date.now()

gives milliseconds since epoch. No need to use new.

Check out the reference here: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Date/now

(Not supported in IE8.)

56

Using new Date().getTime() / 1000 is an incomplete solution for obtaining the seconds, because it produces timestamps with floating-point units.

const timestamp = new Date() / 1000; // 1405792936.933
// Technically, .933 would be milliseconds. 

A better solution would be:

// Rounds the value
const timestamp = Math.round(new Date() / 1000); // 1405792937

// - OR -

// Floors the value
const timestamp = new Date() / 1000 | 0; // 1405792936

Values without floats are also safer for conditional statements, as the float may produce unwanted results. The granularity you obtain with a float may be more than needed.

if (1405792936.993 < 1405792937) // true
  • Totally agree 👍 Use Math.round(new Date() / 1000) – gdibble Oct 6 '18 at 21:20
37

Based on your comment, I think you're looking for something like this:

var timeout = new Date().getTime() + 15*60*1000; //add 15 minutes;

Then in your check, you're checking:

if(new Date().getTime() > timeout) {
  alert("Session has expired");
}
16

To get the number of seconds from the Javascript epoch use:

date = new Date();
milliseconds = date.getTime();
seconds = milliseconds / 1000;
8

// The Current Unix Timestamp
// 1443535752 seconds since Jan 01 1970. (UTC)

// Current time in seconds
console.log(Math.floor(new Date().valueOf() / 1000));  // 1443535752
console.log(Math.floor(Date.now() / 1000));            // 1443535752
console.log(Math.floor(new Date().getTime() / 1000));  // 1443535752
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

jQuery

console.log(Math.floor($.now() / 1000));               // 1443535752
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>

3

These JavaScript solutions give you the milliseconds or the seconds since the midnight, January 1st, 1970.

The IE 9+ solution(IE 8 or the older version doesn't support this.):

var timestampInMilliseconds = Date.now();
var timestampInSeconds = Date.now() / 1000; // A float value; not an integer.
    timestampInSeconds = Math.floor(Date.now() / 1000); // Floor it to get the seconds.
    timestampInSeconds = Date.now() / 1000 | 0; // Also you can do floor it like this.
    timestampInSeconds = Math.round(Date.now() / 1000); // Round it to get the seconds.

To get more information about Date.now(): https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Global_Objects/Date/now

The generic solution:

// ‘+’ operator makes the operand numeric.
// And ‘new’ operator can be used without the arguments ‘(……)’.
var timestampInMilliseconds = +new Date;
var timestampInSeconds = +new Date / 1000; // A float value; not an intger.
    timestampInSeconds = Math.floor(+new Date / 1000); // Floor it to get the seconds.
    timestampInSeconds = +new Date / 1000 | 0; // Also you can do floor it like this.
    timestampInSeconds = Math.round(+new Date / 1000); // Round it to get the seconds.

Be careful to use, if you don't want something like this case.

if(1000000 < Math.round(1000000.2)) // false.
1

You can met another way to get time in seconds/milliseconds since 1 Jan 1970:

var milliseconds = +new Date;        
var seconds = milliseconds / 1000;

But be careful with such approach, cause it might be tricky to read and understand it.

  • I do not know since when using language's side effects is a more elegant way. – tomazahlin Mar 12 '18 at 17:10
  • @tomazahlin you’re right, I’ll modify this answer – tetta Mar 14 '18 at 6:18
1

Better short cuts:

+new Date # Milliseconds since Linux epoch
+new Date / 1000 # Seconds since Linux epoch
Math.round(+new Date / 1000) #Seconds without decimals since Linux epoch
1
Date.now()-Math.floor(Date.now()/1000/60/60/24)*24*60*60*1000

This should give you the milliseconds from the beginning of the day.

(Date.now()-Math.floor(Date.now()/1000/60/60/24)*24*60*60*1000)/1000

This should give you seconds.

(Date.now()-(Date.now()/1000/60/60/24|0)*24*60*60*1000)/1000

Same as previous except uses a bitwise operator to floor the amount of days.

-1

To get today's total seconds of the day:

getTodaysTotalSeconds(){
    let date = new Date();        
    return +(date.getHours() * 60 * 60) + (date.getMinutes() * 60);
}

I have add + in return which return in int. This may help to other developers. :)

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