7

I'm seeking to populate a large numpy array using multiprocessing. I've worked through the concurrent futures examples in the documentation but haven't obtained enough of an understanding to modify the usage.

Here's a simplified version of what I'd like to do:

import numpy
import concurrent.futures

squares = numpy.empty((20, 2))

def make_square(i, squares):
    print('iteration', i)
    squares[i, 0], squares[i, 1] = i, i ** 2

with concurrent.futures.ProcessPoolExecutor(2) as executor: 
    for i in range(20):
        executor.submit(make_square, i, squares)

The output runs something like:

iteration 1
iteration 0
iteration 2
iteration 3
iteration 5
iteration 4
iteration 6
iteration 7
iteration 8
iteration 9
iteration 10
iteration 11
iteration 12
iteration 13
iteration 15
iteration 14
iteration 16
iteration 17
iteration 18
iteration 19

which nicely demonstrates that the function is running concurrently. But the squares array is still empty.

What is the correct syntax to populate the squares array?

Secondly, would using .map be a better implementation?

Thanks in advance!

8/2/17 Wow. So I wandered into reddit-land because I wan't getting any takers for this problem. So happy to be back here at stackoverflow. Thanks @ilia w495 nikitin and @donkopotamus. Here's what I posted in reddit which explains the background to this problem in more detail.

The posted code is an analogy of what I'm trying to do, which is populating 
a numpy array with a relatively simple calculation (dot product) involving 
two other arrays. The algorithm depends on a value N which can be anything 
from 1 on up, though we won't likely use a value larger than 24.

I'm currently running the algorithm on a distributed computing system and  
the N = 20 versions take longer than 10 days to complete. I'm using dozens 
of cores to obtain the required memory, but gaining none of the benefits of 
multiple CPUs. I've rewritten the code using numba which makes lower N 
variants superfast on my own laptop which can't handle the memory 
requirements for larger Ns, but alas, our distributed computing environment 
is not currently able to install numba. So I'm attempting concurrent.futures 
to take advantage of the multiple CPUs in our computing environment in the 
hopes of speeding things up.

So it's not the computation that is time intensive, it's the 16 million + iterations. The initialized array is N x 2 ** N, ie range(16777216) in the above code.

It may be that it's simply not possible to populate an array through multiprocessing.

  • Your squares array is empty because you are trying to modify it within separate processes – donkopotamus Aug 2 '16 at 4:48
  • @zazizoma Not populate but initialize. There is another paradigm. shared data structures should be immutable. I think you should divide your array into C parts, where C is number of CPUs, and handle each part on the separated CPU (process). Then, join all parts and you will get, what you want. But in some cases it is inapplicable. It depends on your algorithm. Also, data sending between processes has it own cost. For example I'll try to implement with pymp: gist.github.com/w495/6d3cd6a715e3098a3a10a0479d9fbb03 With concurrent.futures it'll be easier. – Ilia w495 Nikitin Aug 3 '16 at 2:28
  • Great. I'll also look at running the dot product in multiple CPUs and leave the iterations linear. That may help. REALLY appreciate the guidance. – zazizoma Aug 3 '16 at 2:41
  • @zazizoma This is another part of my project, where I've implemented partitioning with concurrent.futures.ProcessPoolExecutor: gist.github.com/w495/82f7b21509a69a0d70e18f2e4ddf5ed9 I suppose it also can help you. – Ilia w495 Nikitin Aug 4 '16 at 3:27
3

The issue here is that a ProcessPoolExecutor will execute a function within a separate process.

As these are separate processes, with a separate memory space, you cannot expect that any changes they make to your array (squares) will be reflected in the parent. Hence your original array is unchanged (as you are discovering).

You need to do either of the following:

  • use a ThreadPoolExecutor, but be aware in the general case, you still should not try and modify the global variables within multiple threads;
  • recast your code to have your process/thread do some kind of (expensive) computation and return the result.

The latter would look like this:

squares = numpy.zeros((20, 2))

def make_square(i):
    print('iteration', i)

    # compute expensive data here ...

    # return row number and the computed data
    return i, ([i, i**2])

with concurrent.futures.ProcessPoolExecutor(2) as executor: 
    for row, result in executor.map(make_square, range(20)):
        squares[row] = result

This will produce the result you expect:

[[   0.    0.]
 [   1.    1.]
 [   2.    4.]
 ...
 [  18.  324.]
 [  19.  361.]]
  • But what is the reason, to reuse this (squares) variable? It is not guarantee lower memory utilization. More over, it is not good idea, to resend not necessary data through processes. I this case, you can get row via enumerate. – Ilia w495 Nikitin Aug 2 '16 at 5:27
-1

А good example, I suppose it helps you:

from concurrent.futures import ProcessPoolExecutor
from time import sleep

def return_after_5_secs(message):
    sleep(5)
    return message

pool = ProcessPoolExecutor(3)

future = pool.submit(return_after_5_secs, ("hello"))
print(future.done())
sleep(2)
print(future.done())
sleep(2)
print(future.done())
sleep(2)
print(future.done())
print("Result: " + future.result())

Future — is only promise to do something. So I see your code like this:

import concurrent.futures
import itertools
import os
import time

import numpy

SQUARE_LIST_SIZE = 20


def main():
    # Creates empty array.
    square_list = numpy.empty((SQUARE_LIST_SIZE, 2))

    # Creates a sequence (generator) of promises
    future_seq = make_future_seq(square_list)

    # Creates a sequence (generator) of computed square.
    square_seq = make_square_seq(future_seq)

    # Creates a sequence (generator) of computed square.
    square_list = list(square_seq)

    return square_list


def make_future_seq(squares):
    """
        Generates the sequence of empty a promises.
        Creates a new process only on `submit`.
    """

    with concurrent.futures.ProcessPoolExecutor(4) as executor:
        for i in range(SQUARE_LIST_SIZE):
            # Only makes a promise to do something.
            future = executor.submit(make_one_square, i, squares)
            print('future ', i, '= >', future)
            yield future


def make_square_seq(future_seq):
    """
        Generates the sequence of fulfilled a promises.
    """

    # Just to copy iterator
    for_show_1, for_show_2, future_seq = itertools.tee(future_seq, 3)

    # Let's check it, May be it withdrawn =)
    for i, future in enumerate(for_show_1):
        print('future ', i, 'done [1] =>', future.done())

    # Try to keep its promises
    for future in future_seq:
        yield future.result()

    # Let's check it one more time. It is faithful to!
    for i, future in enumerate(for_show_2):
        print('future ', i, 'done [2] =>', future.done())

    return future_seq


def make_one_square(i, squares):
    print('inside [1] = >', i, 'pid = ', os.getpid())
    squares[i, 0], squares[i, 1] = i, i ** 2

    time.sleep(1)  # Long and hard computation.

    print('inside [2]= >', i, 'pid = ', os.getpid())
    return squares


if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

Too may letters. This is just for explanation. It depends, but a lot of real examples require only future.result() call. Check this page: concurrent.futures.html

So this code will generates something like that:

$ python test_futures_1.py 
future  0 = > <Future at 0x7fc0dc758278 state=running>
future  0 done [1] => False
future  1 = > <Future at 0x7fc0dc758da0 state=pending>
inside [1] = > 0 pid =  19364
future  1 done [1] => False
inside [1] = > 1 pid =  19365
future  2 = > <Future at 0x7fc0dc758e10 state=pending>
future  2 done [1] => False
future  3 = > <Future at 0x7fc0dc758cc0 state=pending>
inside [1] = > 2 pid =  19366
future  3 done [1] => False
future  4 = > <Future at 0x7fc0dc769048 state=pending>
future  4 done [1] => False
inside [1] = > 3 pid =  19367
future  5 = > <Future at 0x7fc0dc758f60 state=running>
future  5 done [1] => False
future  6 = > <Future at 0x7fc0dc758fd0 state=pending>
future  6 done [1] => False
future  7 = > <Future at 0x7fc0dc7691d0 state=pending>
future  7 done [1] => False
future  8 = > <Future at 0x7fc0dc769198 state=pending>
future  8 done [1] => False
future  9 = > <Future at 0x7fc0dc7690f0 state=pending>
future  9 done [1] => False
future  10 = > <Future at 0x7fc0dc769438 state=pending>
future  10 done [1] => False
future  11 = > <Future at 0x7fc0dc7694a8 state=pending>
future  11 done [1] => False
future  12 = > <Future at 0x7fc0dc769550 state=pending>
future  12 done [1] => False
future  13 = > <Future at 0x7fc0dc7695f8 state=pending>
future  13 done [1] => False
future  14 = > <Future at 0x7fc0dc7696a0 state=pending>
future  14 done [1] => False
future  15 = > <Future at 0x7fc0dc769748 state=pending>
future  15 done [1] => False
future  16 = > <Future at 0x7fc0dc7697f0 state=pending>
future  16 done [1] => False
future  17 = > <Future at 0x7fc0dc769898 state=pending>
future  17 done [1] => False
future  18 = > <Future at 0x7fc0dc769940 state=pending>
future  18 done [1] => False
future  19 = > <Future at 0x7fc0dc7699e8 state=pending>
future  19 done [1] => False
inside [2]= > 0 pid =  19364
inside [2]= > 1 pid =  19365
inside [1] = > 4 pid =  19364
inside [2]= > 2 pid =  19366
inside [1] = > 5 pid =  19365
inside [1] = > 6 pid =  19366
inside [2]= > 3 pid =  19367
inside [1] = > 7 pid =  19367
inside [2]= > 4 pid =  19364
inside [2]= > 5 pid =  19365
inside [2]= > 6 pid =  19366
inside [1] = > 8 pid =  19364
inside [1] = > 9 pid =  19365
inside [1] = > 10 pid =  19366
inside [2]= > 7 pid =  19367
inside [1] = > 11 pid =  19367
inside [2]= > 8 pid =  19364
inside [2]= > 9 pid =  19365
inside [2]= > 10 pid =  19366
inside [2]= > 11 pid =  19367
inside [1] = > 13 pid =  19366
inside [1] = > 12 pid =  19364
inside [1] = > 14 pid =  19365
inside [1] = > 15 pid =  19367
inside [2]= > 14 pid =  19365
inside [2]= > 13 pid =  19366
inside [2]= > 12 pid =  19364
inside [2]= > 15 pid =  19367
inside [1] = > 16 pid =  19365
inside [1] = > 17 pid =  19364
inside [1] = > 18 pid =  19367
inside [1] = > 19 pid =  19366
inside [2]= > 16 pid =  19365
inside [2]= > 18 pid =  19367
inside [2]= > 17 pid =  19364
inside [2]= > 19 pid =  19366
future  0 done [2] => True
future  1 done [2] => True
future  2 done [2] => True
future  3 done [2] => True
future  4 done [2] => True
future  5 done [2] => True
future  6 done [2] => True
future  7 done [2] => True
future  8 done [2] => True
future  9 done [2] => True
future  10 done [2] => True
future  11 done [2] => True
future  12 done [2] => True
future  13 done [2] => True
future  14 done [2] => True
future  15 done [2] => True
future  16 done [2] => True
future  17 done [2] => True
future  18 done [2] => True
future  19 done [2] => True
  • Yes, but as I understand, the initial problem is not in initialising squares. I suppose, that real problem is in understanding how to work with PoolExecutor. – Ilia w495 Nikitin Aug 2 '16 at 5:01

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