13

This question already has an answer here:

We are looking to use SLF4J, but one thing we found was that you can't specify the level as an argument, i.e

Logger.log(Level.INFO, "messsage");

You have to do this

logger.info("message");

this prevents being able to pass everything through a method, so you can tack other properties to all log messages in a class.

public class Test
{
    public Test(SomeObj obj)
    {
       log(Level.INFO, "message");
    }

    public void anotherMethod()
    {
       log(Level.DEBUG, "another message");
    }
    private void log(Level level, String message)
    {
        logger.log(level, message + obj.someString());
    }
}

Is there a way to achieve this using SLF4j ?

marked as duplicate by user177800 Dec 9 '15 at 20:31

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 1
    pass string "INFO" and "DEBUG", and use reflection to invoke the correct method - just kidding! – irreputable Sep 30 '10 at 16:25
  • Indeed it is very shortsighted and regretful that most (probably all) contemporary loggers still follow that archaic paradigm – matanster Sep 15 '15 at 12:55
9

Write a wrapper around the slf4j call and create your own enum for the six log levels. Then in your wrapper, use a switch to call the correct slf4j call.

void myLog(Level level, String message)
{
  switch (level)
  {
  case FATAL:
    log.fatal(message);
    break;
  case ERROR:
    log.error(message);
    break;
  ....
  }
}
  • How is there not a log(Level level, ...) method? – Josh M. Aug 13 '18 at 20:02
6

The answer is No. Refer to this discussion.

  • There is a way to do it, but it involves getting a handle to the native logger that slf4j found. -- see my answer below. – PaulG Jul 20 '12 at 18:09
3

Your usecase screams for the delegation pattern. Basically you wedge your own implementation of Logger between your code and SLF4J and "extend" the relevant methods:

class MyLogger implements Logger {

    Logger realLogger;
    Object userData;


    MyLogger(Class clazz, Object userData){
        this.realLogger = LoggerFactory.getLogger(clazz);
    }

    public void debug(String msg) {
        realLogger.debug(msg + userData.someString());
    }

    // many more methods, perhaps per java.lang.reflect.Proxy
}

This is use in the business code like this:

public class Test
{
    Logger log;

    public Test(SomeObj obj)
    {
       log = new MyLogger(Test.class, obj);
       log.logInfo("message");
    }

    public void anotherMethod()
    {
       logDebug("another message");
    }
}

For optimal reusability of the MyLogger class SomeObj should either use Object.toString() or it should implement an interface which MyLogger can use to get the message addendum.

1

Well, technically SLF4J doesn't offer you a logger.log(Level, message) method. But I found a way around that. [edit: uses introspection]

Using the below code snippet you can get the native logger that slf4j found and wrapped for you at runtime. If you'll recall, slf4j is simply a wrapper around an slf4j implementation from another provider (either, jdkLogging, Log4J, JCL, etc...). So here:

public Object getNativeLogger( org.slf4j.Logger logger ) {
   Object result = null;
   if ( logger.getClass().getName().equals("org.slf4j.impl.Log4jLoggerAdapter")) {
      try {
         Field f = Log4jLoggerAdapter.class.getDeclaredField("logger");
         f.setAccessible( true );
         result = (org.apache.log4j.Logger)f.get(logger);
      }
      catch( Exception e ) {
         System.out.println("Unable to access native log4j logger");
      }
   }
   else if ( logger.getClass().getName().equals("org.slf4j.impl.JDK14LoggerAdapter")) {
      try {
         Field f = Jdk14Logger.class.getDeclaredField("logger");
         f.setAccessible( true );
         result = (Jdk14Logger)f.get(logger);
      }
      catch( Exception e ) {
         System.out.println("Unable to access native log4j logger");
      }
   }
   else if (.....  other native loggers slf4j supports)....
   }
   return result;
}

Then you can use it like this:

   Object l = getNativeLogger(mySlf4jLogger);
   if ( l instanceof org.apache.log4j.Logger ) {
      org.apache.log4j.Logger logger = (org.apache.log4j.Logger) l;
      logger.log( CUSTOMLog4JLevel, message);
   }
   else if( .... other implementations that you care about ...)...

So while it's not technically within slf4j, it is possible to do it using slf4j as your primary logging interface.

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