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This question already has an answer here:

I have tried using Number(x).toLocaleString(), but this only gives me 10,000.

When I use parseFloat(row.profit).toFixed(2) it gives me 10000.00. I tried combining parseFloat(Number(row.profit)toLocaleString()).toFixed(2) But not give me the desired output which should be 10,000.00. How can I achieve this?

marked as duplicate by nnnnnn javascript Jul 12 '16 at 6:55

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • look at the specs for toLocaleString. minimumFractionDigits is an option you can set. – user3154108 Jul 12 '16 at 6:53
  • OK, so you didn't ask about money, but if you ignore the dollar sign the linked duplicate is asking the same thing about the commas and decimals, and e.g., this answer does it with a fairly short function. – nnnnnn Jul 12 '16 at 6:56
  • Consider the answers to How to format numbers using JavaScript?, which uses toLocaleString to determine whether to use "," for thousands and "." for decimal or vice versa. – RobG Jul 12 '16 at 6:59
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    @nnnnnn the link answer is delete please check – guradio Jul 12 '16 at 6:59
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    @guradio - Sorry, I accidentally double-pasted the URL in my link. Have edited my previous comment to fix it. – nnnnnn Jul 12 '16 at 7:01
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You can use a quick hack by testing if . is present in your locale string or not :

function localeFormat(x) {
  var num = Number(x).toLocaleString();
  if (num.indexOf("/.") > 0) {
    num += ".00";
  }else{
    var n = parseFloat(x).toFixed(2).toString();  
    num = Number(n).toLocaleString();
  }
  return num;
}
var strs = ["10000", "10000.45", "10000.45768"];
for(var i = 0; i < strs.length; i++){
  console.log(strs[i] + " -> " + localeFormat(strs[i]));
}

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