-1

I need a method that will run only once from the background no matter how many threads call it. I found a partial solution using this code my code:

public static void async(final int a){
    Thread th = new Thread(new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            meth(a);
        }
    });
    th.start();
}
public static synchronized void meth(final int a){
    try {
        Thread.sleep(1000);
        System.out.println(a);
    } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
        Logger.getLogger(Simple.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
    }
}

But when I test it like that:

System.out.println("start");
async(11);
async(12);
async(13);
async(14);
async(15);
async(16);
async(17);
async(18);
async(19);
System.out.println("end");

I got those results:

start end 11 19 18 17 15 16 14 13 12

Is there anything wrong with my code? Why the results are not in the same order as the call?

edited after using Thread.join

public static Object obg = new Object();

public static void async(final int a){
    Thread th = new Thread(new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            meth(a);
        }
    });
    th.start();
    try {
        th.join();
    } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
        Logger.getLogger(Simple.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
    }
}

public static synchronized void meth(final int a){
    try {
        Thread.sleep(1000);
        System.out.println(a);
    } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
        Logger.getLogger(Simple.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
    }
}

i got this result which cancled the background work :

start 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 end

Thread.join didn't gave me the results I wish

edit for the third time to give example from other languages.

I tried the same code in c#

 static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("start");
        async(11);
        async(12);
        async(13);
        async(14);
        async(15);
        async(16);
        async(17);
        async(18);
        Console.WriteLine("end");
    }

    static Object o = new Object();
    public static void async(int a){
        new Thread(() =>
        {
            lock (o)
            {
                Thread.Sleep(1000);
                Console.WriteLine(a);
            }
        }).Start();
    }

the results was in the same order

test results from swift language are the same as c#

so my question is : how to achieve those results in java

edit : results of using the newly created thread in the join

code :

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    System.out.println("start");
    async(19,async(18,async(17,async(16,async(15,async(14,async(13,async(12,async(11,null)))))))));
    System.out.println("end");
}

public static Object obg = new Object();

public static Thread async(final int a,final Thread other){
    Thread th = new Thread(new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            meth(a);
        }
    });
    th.start();
    try {
        if(other!=null){
            other.join();
        }
    } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
        Logger.getLogger(Simple.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
    }
    return th;
}

public static synchronized void meth(final int a){
    try {
        Thread.sleep(1000);
        System.out.println(a);
    } catch (InterruptedException ex) {
        Logger.getLogger(Simple.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
    }
}

results :

start 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 end 19

background work was also canceled.

  • 1
    Possible duplicate of Run Java Threads sequentially – Idos Jul 12 '16 at 12:04
  • @Idos I tried the solution provided in the website I got this result : start 11 12 13 14 15 end , as you see now nothing run in the background. – Mouhammad Jul 12 '16 at 12:07
  • same code tested using swift language and gave my the results I wish can we say that this problem bug from java? – Mouhammad Jul 12 '16 at 12:17
  • To say you have a found a bug within Java is highly presumptuous and probably not true... – Idos Jul 12 '16 at 12:19
  • not that I found it, but the results say that – Mouhammad Jul 12 '16 at 12:21
2

Your main thread starts nine others, giving each child thread a different a, and the first thing that all nine of those child threads do is sleep for one second.

The timing resolution in the Thread.sleep() call is undefined---It depends on the underlying operating system---and it's quite possible that all of the threads were elgible to wake up on the same tick of the system clock.

Java makes no guarantee that the threads will start running in the order that their Thread objects were start()ed, and it makes no guarantee that they will wake up in the order in which they went to sleep.

Any time you want things to happen in a certain order, the best way to make that happen is to do all of the things in a single thread.


I need this section to run sequentially...I don't want it to run twice or more at the same time...I still want it to run in the background.

OK., I get it now.

You probably want to use java.util.concurrent.Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor(). That function will return a thread pool with a single worker thread.

The worker thread will run tasks that you submit to the pool "in the background", and it will run them, one at a time, in the order that they were submitted.

static final ExecutorService singleThreadExecutor = Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor();

public static void async(final int a) {
    singleThreadExecutor.submit(new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            meth(a);
        }
    });
}
  • I used sleep method instead of long running operation to make my example simple, my problem is that I have a critical section in my software, and I need this section to run sequentially no mater which thread call it. to make it simple I don't want it to run twice or more at the same time, but yet I still want it to run in the background – Mouhammad Jul 12 '16 at 14:29
  • @Mouhammad, see my updated answer. – Solomon Slow Jul 12 '16 at 15:20
  • I'm amazed, the solution you give work exactly how I want it, thanks – Mouhammad Jul 12 '16 at 15:30
1

You appear to have two different questions here. You start by saying that you "need a method that will run only once from the background, no matter how many threads call it," which is one issue, and then you go on to say that the results from the different threads do not happen in the order that you want.

Question #1: Making the method run only once

You did not specify what exactly you mean by "run only once no matter how many threads call it." When it comes to multi-threaded programming, there are a few different common things that could be meant by that.Because of the example code you supplied, I will assume that you mean you want only one one at a time, but that you do want multiple calls to the method.

For this question, you are on the right track. If you have some data or action that you want to only be accessible to one thread at a time, the correct way to do that is to use a lock, also known as a mutex. In Java, this is done by creating an object to serve as a lock. The object can be of any class type - that part is not important. The important part is that all threads which need to have mutually exclusive access to some data or action all use the same instance of the locking object. A lock must be obtained on the object before the data or action is accessed, then it must be released after.

Now, with that theory part out of the way, the "synchronized" keyword you have applied to your method is more easily explained. When you apply synchronized to a Java method, what happens is that the "this" object, the one that "owns" the method (in your case, whichever object instance owns the call to meth(int)), is the object used as a lock. A lock is obtained on this before the body of the method is executed, and the lock is released after the body of the method is finished executing. This allows only one thread to access that code at a time.

Remember, though, that the different threads need to have the same instance of the lock object. If you have more than one object of whatever type you have there, then the different instances of the object can have their synchronized methods running concurrently with each other because they have separate locks.

This is probably more than sufficient to answer that part of this question, considering you were already using synchronized. For further reading, see the link I will supply at the bottom.

Question #2: Why are these threads happening out of order?

This question has a quick and easy answer: if you do not specifically do something to cause it to be otherwise, then no guarantee is ever made that the threads will ever happen in any specific order. It is as simple as that.

In your case, each thread sleeps for a second as the first thing it does, but that happens as part of that thread's action. Basically, all of your threads are all sleeping for a second at basically the same time, and then the second is up for all of them as basically the same time. And no guarantee is made about what order they will execute in.

If you had made it sleep in between instantiations of the new threads, then you probably would have caused the execution to be in the order you expected. That is, async(1); sleep; async(2); sleep; async(3); etc.. probably would have given you results more like what you seem to have been expecting, though that would sleep between every call to async and so would take a long time to finish everything. However, please note, this is not the way you should accomplish what you are looking for. Although you would probably get the output in the order you want if you sleep between calls to async, you are not guaranteed to get that order even then. For example, if your system is bogged down by other activities, it might throw off the timing such that one call to meth takes more than two seconds, so you have multiple threads waiting on the lock, and you once again get the results out of order.

Without direct intervention of some type, you are never guaranteed a thread execution order. If T1 and T2 are both executed or both waiting on a join or for whatever reason want to run, you never know which one will happen first. Usually there's no need to know.

If you need to force your threads to happen in a certain order - something which you generally want to try to avoid in order to maximize the liveness of your threads, but which sometimes is necessary - then try to take a look at some of the special Java concurrency objects which help get the timing that you might want. You can find some of them at the link I will provide below.

In the very specific case that you are supplying to us, if you just want a linear order (or even a tree-like order) where you have a set of threads {T1, T2, ..., Tn} you could use join, as you were starting to do (you were close again!), but make each thread join the one before it instead of all joining one thread. That is, have T2 join T1, T3 join T2, and so on. You can get linear execution this way, and you can also get a tree-like pattern: if you just care that T3 and T4 happen after T2 but you don't care which goes first between T3 and T4 then they can both join T2 - do this where you can to increase liveness.

If your end-goal is exactly like your question here where they are all executed linearly, you might be better off doing it in one single thread but having a list of actions that one thread needs to take, then that one thread can execute these things in order, each time it does all the actions and there's none left it then waits for more. This paragraph does not answer your question, but it's a suggestion about another way to do it, which may or may not be better depending on your use case.

And the link I mentioned...

Java Concurrency Trail (edit: Sorry I botched the link the first time. Fixed.)

Check out that resource thoroughly. Notice the table of contents there to help you navigate around the sub-topics of Java concurrency. Some of the examples there might be difficult to grasp at first, but you seem to be going in the right direction. Keep at it.

  • my problem was in the second part when you answer with if you do not specifically do something to cause it to be otherwise, then no guarantee is ever made that the threads will ever happen in any specific order. It is as simple as that. is that mean that there is no way to make threads calls in order ? – Mouhammad Jul 12 '16 at 14:32
  • 1
    @Mouhammad There is no guarantee about order by default. If you want them in a certain order, you need to do something to put them in order. I tried to be thorough in my answer, but the simplest way for your specific case is probably to use join, which you were starting to use, except you need to make each thread join the thread before it instead of making them all join the same thread. Maybe give async a Thread parameter and make it return a Thread too as in Thread async(final int a, Thread t). – Aaron Jul 12 '16 at 14:44
  • @Mouhammad Then, inside async, you could have the newly created thread join on t, and you could return the newly created thread to be passed to the next async call. The first one would have t = null, so you would need to check for that and not join if t == null. This is only one way to do it. – Aaron Jul 12 '16 at 14:46
  • I updated my question by adding the result of the method you mention, it still block my current running thread, as you see "start" not flowed directly by "end" – Mouhammad Jul 12 '16 at 14:57

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