25

If I want to represent my view controller's state as a single struct and then implement an undo mechanism, how would I change, say, one property on the struct and, at the same time, get a copy of the the previous state?

struct A {
   let a: Int
   let b: Int

   init(a: Int = 2, b: Int = 3) {
      self.a = a
      self.b = b
   }
}

let state = A()

Now I want a copy of state but with b = 4. How can I do this without constructing a new object and having to specify a value for every property?

14
  • 1
    b is immutable contradicts how would I change, say, one property on the struct. Unless you're looking for a way to initialize a new struct with the properties of the previous one except some of them?
    – Eric Aya
    Jul 12 '16 at 14:19
  • 2
    @robmayoff They don't need to be, but its said that immutability makes code safer. Jul 12 '16 at 14:47
  • 5
    If only Swift had Kotlin's convenient way of doing this... Nov 20 '19 at 17:08
  • 3
    @IanWarburton val jack = User(name = "Jack", age = 1) val olderJack = jack.copy(age = 2) Nov 21 '19 at 21:28
  • 1
    @IanWarburton A copy function is made for all DataClass types (Kotlin's version of a struct) and that function has optional parameters for each property. Nov 21 '19 at 21:30
27

Note, that while you use placeholder values for constants a and b you are not able to construct instance of A with any other values but this placeholders. Write initializer instead. You may write custom method that change any value in struct also:

struct A {
    let a: Int
    let b: Int

    init(a: Int = 2, b: Int = 3) {
        self.a = a
        self.b = b
    }

    func changeValues(a: Int? = nil, b: Int? = nil) -> A {
        return A(a: a ?? self.a, b: b ?? self.b)
    }
}

let state = A()
let state2 = state.changeValues(b: 4)
2
  • I've updated the question to remove the placeholders. Jul 12 '16 at 14:45
  • 14
    Seems a shame that the logic in your answer isn't part of the language given that Swift is good at making copies of values. Jul 12 '16 at 14:46
14

If you can live with the properties being mutable, this is an alternative approach. Advantage is that it works for every struct and there's no need to change the function upon adding a property:

struct A {
    var a: Int
    var b: Int

    func changing(change: (inout A) -> Void) -> A {
        var a = self
        change(&a)
        return a
    }
}

let state = A(a: 2, b: 3)

let nextState = state.changing{ $0.b = 4 }

You could also have an extension for this:

protocol Changeable {}
extension Changeable {
    func changing(change: (inout Self) -> Void) -> Self {
        var a = self
        change(&a)
        return a
    }
}

extension A : Changeable {}

Also you can use this to do it without any additional code:

let nextState = {
    var a = state
    a.b = 4
    return a
}()

And if you don't mind the new struct being mutable, it's just

var nextState = state
nextState.b = 4
3
  • Why not, as @Shadow of wrote, let state2 = state; state2.b = 4? Jul 12 '16 at 14:53
  • 1
    @IanWarburton Because you'd have to make state2 mutable to make it compile. I added a simpler one if you don't want any additional code, while not being as pretty.
    – Kametrixom
    Jul 12 '16 at 14:55
  • Sensible thing to do is, as you suggest, make things mutable and, in order to create a new undo state, push the instance onto an "undo" stack before modifying it. Jul 12 '16 at 15:47
7

The answers here are ridiculous, especially in case struct's members change.

Let's understand how Swift works.

When a struct is set from one variable to another, the struct is automatically cloned in the new variable, i.e. the same structs are not related to each other.

struct A {
    let a: Int
    var b: Int
}

let a = A(a: 5, b: 10)
var a1 = a
a1.b = 69
print("a.b = \(a.b); a1.b = \(a1.b)") // prints "a.b = 10; a1.b = 69"

Keep in mind though that members in struct must be marked as 'var' not 'let', if you plan to change them.

More info here: https://docs.swift.org/swift-book/LanguageGuide/ClassesAndStructures.html

That's good, but if you still want to copy and mofify in one line, add this function to your struct:

func change<T>(path: WritableKeyPath<A, T>, to value: T) -> A {
    var clone = self
    clone[keyPath: path] = value
    return clone
}

Now the example from before changes to this:

let a = A(a: 5, b: 10)
let a1 = a.change(path: \.b, to: 69)
print("a.b = \(a.b); a1.b = \(a1.b)") // prints "a.b = 10; a1.b = 69"

I see that adding 'change' to a lot of struct would be painful, but an extension would be great:

protocol Changeable {}

extension Changeable {
    func change<T>(path: WritableKeyPath<Self, T>, to value: T) -> Self {
        var clone = self
        clone[keyPath: path] = value
        return clone
    }
}

Extend your struct with 'Changeable' and you will have your 'change' function.

6
  • I like the extension and setting via WriteableKeyPath, but this does still require the struct members to be declared as mutable var... which the question is (partially) trying to avoid.
    – pkamb
    Mar 18 at 16:29
  • True, but the struct must be in 'var' variable, in order to make it mutable, therefore there is no need to worry, coz u can't just accidently mutate it. Mar 18 at 18:56
  • The drawback of this approach is that you are limited to change a single property but considering the question title that's fine.
    – Leo Dabus
    Jun 25 at 17:46
  • @LeoDabus what about variadic parameter? Jun 26 at 0:02
  • @ArutyunEnfendzhyan not sure what you mean by that
    – Leo Dabus
    Jun 26 at 0:25
2

I really like @Shadow answer, but I had a hard time adapting it to a scenario were the fields of the struct could be nullable, so I decided to use the builder pattern instead. My code looks something like this:

struct A {
    let a: Int?
    let b: Int?

    class Builder {
        private var a: Int?
        private var b: Int?

        init(struct: A) {
            self.a = struct.a
            self.b = struct.b
        }

        func build() -> A {
            return A(a: self.a, b: self.b)
        }

        func withA(_ a: Int?) -> Builder {
            self.a = a
            return self
        }

        func withB(_ b: Int?) -> Builder {
            self.b = b
            return self
        }
    }
}

And then you can use it like:

A.Builder(struct: myA).withA(a).withB(nil).build()

With this my structs are really immutable, and I can quickly create a copy and change one or many of its field to be either nil or another Int

1

The best way I have found is to write an initializer method that takes an object of the same type to "copy", and then has optional parameters to set each individual property that you want to change.

The optional init parameters allow you to skip any property that you want to remain unchanged from the original struct.

struct Model {
    let a: String
    let b: String
    
    init(a: String, b: String) {
        self.a = a
        self.b = b
    }
    
    init(model: Model, a: String? = nil, b: String? = nil) {
        self.a = a ?? model.a
        self.b = b ?? model.b
    }
}

let model1 = Model(a: "foo", b: "bar")
let model2 = Model(model: model1, b: "baz")

// Output:
// model1: {a:"foo", b:"bar"}
// model2: {a:"foo", b:"baz"}
1
  • With big structs i got a stack overflow crash with same way of implementation.
    – Nik Kov
    Nov 10 '20 at 11:07

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