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I have encountered something odd in JavaFX (java version 1.8.0_91). It was my understanding that if one wants to update the UI from a separate thread, one must either use Platform.runLater(taskThatUpdates) or one of the tools in the javafx.concurrent package.

However, if I have a TableView on which I call .setItems(someObservableList), I can update someObservableList from a separate thread and see the corresponding changes to my TableView without the expected Exception in thread "X" java.lang.IllegalStateException: Not on FX application thread; currentThread = X error.

If I replace TableView with ListView, the expected error occurs.

Example code for situation #1: updating a TableView from a different thread, with no call to Platform.runLater()--and no error.

public class Test extends Application {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Application.launch(args);
    }

    @Override
    public void start(Stage stage) throws Exception {
        // Create a table of integers with one column to display
        TableView<Integer> data = new TableView<>();
        TableColumn<Integer, Integer> num = new TableColumn<>("Number");
        num.setCellValueFactory(v -> new ReadOnlyObjectWrapper(v.getValue()));
        data.getColumns().add(num);

        // Create a window & add the table
        VBox root = new VBox();
        Scene scene = new Scene(root);
        root.getChildren().addAll(data);
        stage.setScene(scene);
        stage.show();

        // Create a list of numbers & bind the table to it
        ObservableList<Integer> someNumbers = FXCollections.observableArrayList();
        data.setItems(someNumbers);

        // Add a new number every second from a different thread
        new Thread( () -> {
            for (;;) {
                try {
                    Thread.sleep(1000);
                    someNumbers.add((int) (Math.random() * 1000));
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
            }
        }).start();
    }
}

Example code for situation #2: updating a ListView from a different thread, with no call to Platform.runLater()--produces an error.

public class Test extends Application {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Application.launch(args);
    }

    @Override
    public void start(Stage stage) throws Exception {
        // Create a list of integers (instead of a table)
        ListView<Integer> data = new ListView<>();

        // Create a window & add the table
        VBox root = new VBox();
        Scene scene = new Scene(root);
        root.getChildren().addAll(data);
        stage.setScene(scene);
        stage.show();

        // Create a list of numbers & bind the table to it
        ObservableList<Integer> someNumbers = FXCollections.observableArrayList();
        data.setItems(someNumbers);

        // Add a new number every second from a different thread
        new Thread( () -> {
            for (;;) {
                try {
                    Thread.sleep(1000);
                    someNumbers.add((int) (Math.random() * 1000));
                } catch (InterruptedException e) {
                    e.printStackTrace();
                }
            }
        }).start();
    }
}

Note that the only difference is the instantiation of data as a ListView<Integer> rather than a TableView<Integer>.

So what gives here? Is this happening because of the call to TableColumn::setCellValueFactory() in the first example?--that's my intuition. I would like to know why one does not cause an error and the other does, and more specifically what the rules are for how the .setItems call binds data to the view.

  • There is a difference in handling the itemsProperty. In TableView the property will be invalidated and the old reference is stored in a weakreference object. In ListView ist only a SimpleObjectProperty without a custom invalidated method. So in ListView the change will be queued on the application thread and in TableView not?! – NwDev Jul 13 '16 at 7:58
  • 2
    Curious case! 2 observations: 1. The ListView-example does not behave correctly imo as well. The exception gets thrown after the second edit. 2. Maybe you are on to something with your intuition. Changing the factory to num.setCellValueFactory(v -> new SimpleObjectProperty<>( v.getValue())); produces an (immediate) exception. – Oliver Jan Krylow Jul 13 '16 at 8:02
  • The API for the JavaFX toolkit requires that you make changes to nodes that are part of a scene on the FX Application Thread. The behavior if you make these changes from a different thread is simply not defined by the API: in other words there is no notion whatsoever of "correct behavior" in this case. The toolkit makes a "best effort" to throw a runtime exception if you violate this rule, but doesn't guarantee to do so in all cases - for example it will not jeopardize performance in order to check the correct thread. – James_D Jul 13 '16 at 15:10
  • Undefined behavior is undefined behavior. Even if it does what you want one day, you should still consider it incorrect because it might not do what you expect tomorrow, or after you update to a newer version of Java, or on a different computer, or when you look at it sideways. There is usually not much sense in asking "Why does undefined behavior X perform as if defined in situation Y?" The entire notion of undefined doesn't mean "it will throw an error" or "it will crash"; it means "don't count on it" and that's all the guarantee you get. And that's precisely what you are getting here. – Loduwijk Jul 13 '16 at 16:58
6

As @James_D already mentioned, you should not update things that belongs to the FX Application Thread on any other thread. But in your example you've been updating the ObservableList in another thread. No matter why this work for TableView and for ListView not, it is the wrong way of doing it.

Have a look at the Task class if you want to perform intermediate updates on backing ObservableLists.

From the Task-API-Doc

A Task Which Returns An ObservableList

Because the ListView, TableView, and other UI controls and scene graph nodes make use of ObservableList, it is common to want to create and return an ObservableList from a Task. When you do not care to display intermediate values, the easiest way to correctly write such a Task is simply to construct an ObservableList within the call method, and then return it at the conclusion of the Task.

and another hint:

A Task Which Returns Partial Results

Sometimes you want to create a Task which will return partial results. Perhaps you are building a complex scene graph and want to show the scene graph as it is being constructed. Or perhaps you are reading a large amount of data over the network and want to display the entries in a TableView as the data is arriving. In such cases, there is some shared state available both to the FX Application Thread and the background thread. Great care must be taken to never update shared state from any thread other than the FX Application Thread.

The easiest way to do this is to take advantage of the updateValue(Object) method. This method may be called repeatedly from the background thread. Updates are coalesced to prevent saturation of the FX event queue. This means you can call it as frequently as you like from the background thread but only the most recent set is ultimately set.

An example of such a Task class for doing intermediate updates on ObservableLists for TableView and ListView is:

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Random;
import javafx.application.Application;
import javafx.application.Platform;
import javafx.beans.property.ReadOnlyObjectProperty;
import javafx.beans.property.ReadOnlyObjectWrapper;
import javafx.collections.FXCollections;
import javafx.collections.ObservableList;
import javafx.concurrent.Task;
import javafx.scene.Scene;
import javafx.scene.control.ListView;
import javafx.scene.control.TableColumn;
import javafx.scene.control.TableView;
import javafx.scene.layout.VBox;
import javafx.stage.Stage;

public class IntermediateTest extends Application {

    @Override
    public void start(Stage primaryStage) {

        TableView<Integer> tv = new TableView<>();
        TableColumn<Integer, Integer> num = new TableColumn<>("Number");
        num.setCellValueFactory(v -> new ReadOnlyObjectWrapper(v.getValue()));
        tv.getColumns().add(num);
        PartialResultsTask prt = new PartialResultsTask();
        tv.setItems(prt.getPartialResults());

        ListView<Integer> lv = new ListView<>();
        PartialResultsTask prt1 = new PartialResultsTask();
        lv.setItems(prt1.getPartialResults());
        new Thread(prt).start();
        new Thread(prt1).start();

        // Create a window & add the table
        VBox root = new VBox();
        root.getChildren().addAll(tv, lv);
        Scene scene = new Scene(root, 300, 450);

        primaryStage.setTitle("Data-Adding");
        primaryStage.setScene(scene);
        primaryStage.show();
    }

    /**
     * @param args the command line arguments
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        launch(args);
    }

    public class PartialResultsTask extends Task<ObservableList<Integer>> {

        private ReadOnlyObjectWrapper<ObservableList<Integer>> partialResults
                = new ReadOnlyObjectWrapper<>(this, "partialResults",
                        FXCollections.observableArrayList(new ArrayList()));

        public final ObservableList getPartialResults() {
            return partialResults.get();
        }

        public final ReadOnlyObjectProperty<ObservableList<Integer>> partialResultsProperty() {
            return partialResults.getReadOnlyProperty();
        }

        @Override
        protected ObservableList call() throws Exception {
            updateMessage("Creating Integers...");
            Random rnd = new Random();
            for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
                Thread.sleep(1000);
                if (isCancelled()) {
                    break;
                }
                final Integer r = rnd.ints(100, 10000).findFirst().getAsInt();
                Platform.runLater(() -> {
                    getPartialResults().add(r);
                });
                updateProgress(i, 10);
            }
            return partialResults.get();
        }
    }

}

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