49

I'm going through the ruby koans, I'm on 151 and I just hit a brick wall.

Here is the koan:

# You need to write the triangle method in the file 'triangle.rb'
require 'triangle.rb'

class AboutTriangleProject2 < EdgeCase::Koan
  # The first assignment did not talk about how to handle errors.
  # Let's handle that part now.
  def test_illegal_triangles_throw_exceptions
    assert_raise(TriangleError) do triangle(0, 0, 0) end
    assert_raise(TriangleError) do triangle(3, 4, -5) end
    assert_raise(TriangleError) do triangle(1, 1, 3) end
    assert_raise(TriangleError) do triangle(2, 4, 2) end
 end
end

Then in triangle.rb we have:

def triangle(a, b, c)
  # WRITE THIS CODE
  if a==b && a==c
    return :equilateral
  end
  if (a==b && a!=c) || (a==c && a!=b) || (b==c && b!=a)
    return :isosceles
  end
  if a!=b && a!=c && b!=c
    return :scalene
  end
  if a==0 && b==0 && c==0
    raise new.TriangleError
  end



end

# Error class used in part 2.  No need to change this code.
class TriangleError < StandardError

end

I am beyond confused - any help at all would be much appreciated!

EDIT: To complete this koan, I need to put something in the TriangleError class - but I have no idea what

UPDATE: Here is what the koan karma thing is saying:

<TriangleError> exception expected but none was thrown.
4
  • Hi Daniel - updated my question to be a little more clear
    – Elliot
    Sep 30, 2010 at 19:45
  • 4
    Here's my minimal solution: gist.github.com/1126423
    – danneu
    Aug 4, 2011 at 22:11
  • 1
    @ColonelPanic: The geometric definition of a triangle is secondary, and very nearly irrelevant, here; the goal is to write code that passes the test shown at the beginning of the question. You can do that without knowing anything about geometry. (The reason the :equilateral etc are returned, is that this test builds upon a previous test that defined what should be returned.)
    – cHao
    Oct 13, 2012 at 21:51
  • Not an answer to the question but your second if condition could be simplified by using elsif without any of the fancy ways in the answers . if a == b && b == c return :equilateral elsif a == b || b == c || a == c return :isosceles else return :scalene end Jan 7, 2020 at 0:17

38 Answers 38

56
  1. A triangle should not have any sides of length 0. If it does, it's either a line segment or a point, depending on how many sides are 0.
  2. Negative length doesn't make sense.
  3. Any two sides of a triangle should add up to more than the third side.
  4. See 3, and focus on the "more".

You shouldn't need to change the TriangleError code, AFAICS. Looks like your syntax is just a little wacky. Try changing

raise new.TriangleError

to

raise TriangleError, "why the exception happened"

Also, you should be testing the values (and throwing exceptions) before you do anything with them. Move the exception stuff to the beginning of the function.

10
  • Hi cHao, thanks for your comment! I undestand when to raise the exceptions, I just dont understand what goes in the TriangleError class
    – Elliot
    Sep 30, 2010 at 19:55
  • 3
    Doesn't the code itself say "No need to change this code"? It should just work.
    – cHao
    Sep 30, 2010 at 19:57
  • That was from part 1 of the class, in part 2 (this part) you do change the code
    – Elliot
    Sep 30, 2010 at 20:00
  • You sure? People don't normally say "you don't need to change this" if they require you to change it.
    – cHao
    Sep 30, 2010 at 20:05
  • I'm not 100% sure, I updated the question at the bottom. The koan won't let me proceed until I change something here.
    – Elliot
    Sep 30, 2010 at 20:06
32

You forgot the case when a,b, or c are negative:

def triangle(a, b, c)
  raise TriangleError if [a,b,c].min <= 0
  x, y, z = [a,b,c].sort
  raise TriangleError if x + y <= z
  [:equilateral,:isosceles,:scalene].fetch([a,b,c].uniq.size - 1)
end
2
  • 1
    More concise if you sort first then test once with condition x <= 0 || x + y <= z. Also no need to use fetch as [a,b,c].uniq.size will always be in (1..3) owing to the fact that a,b,c are required parameters.
    – SLD
    Nov 19, 2013 at 15:39
  • 7
    Concise. But I'm not sure if this much of brevity makes up for the sacrificed readability (esp. for the people who will be reading this code later). Mar 27, 2014 at 7:08
13

Ended up doing this:

def triangle(a, b, c)
  a, b, c = [a, b, c].sort
  raise TriangleError if a <= 0 || a + b <= c
  [nil, :equilateral, :isosceles, :scalene][[a, b, c].uniq.size]
end

Thanks to commenters here :)

0
10
def triangle(a, b, c)
  [a, b, c].permutation do |sides|
    raise TriangleError unless sides[0] + sides[1] > sides[2]
  end
  case [a,b,c].uniq.size
    when 3; :scalene
    when 2; :isosceles
    when 1; :equilateral
  end
end
1
  • Such beautiful code!
    – nickang
    Mar 4 at 9:05
9

I like Cory's answer. But I wonder if there's any reason or anything to gain by having four tests, when you could have two:

raise TriangleError, "Sides must by numbers greater than zero" if (a <= 0) || (b <= 0) || (c <= 0)
raise TriangleError, "No two sides can add to be less than or equal to the other side" if (a+b <= c) || (a+c <= b) || (b+c <= a)
3
  • Should work fine. The only useful difference is the ability to specify different error messages for, say, zero vs negative lengths. Which i don't really see a need for either. People are just doing 4 checks cause there's explicitly 4 cases that the test is checking for, and they're coding to pass the test.
    – cHao
    Jun 3, 2011 at 13:58
  • True, although greater than zero implies positive doesn't it? Jun 6, 2011 at 0:01
  • 1
    Yep. But there are 4 tests the code has to pass, and some people do a tunnel vision thing where they focus only on the current test, ignoring all the others. I imagine someone will argue it's more correct or something from a TDD perspective, but yeah. There's no reason not to condense it to 2 checks, IMO.
    – cHao
    Jun 6, 2011 at 3:36
8

You don't need to modify the Exception. Something like this should work;

def triangle(*args)
  args.sort!
  raise TriangleError if args[0] + args[1] <= args[2] || args[0] <= 0
  [nil, :equilateral, :isosceles, :scalene][args.uniq.length]
end
4

I wanted a method that parsed all arguments effectively instead of relying on the order given in the test assertions.

def triangle(a, b, c)
  # WRITE THIS CODE
  [a,b,c].permutation { |p| 
     if p[0] + p[1] <= p[2]
       raise TriangleError, "Two sides of a triangle must be greater than the remaining side."
     elsif p.count { |x| x <= 0} > 0
       raise TriangleError, "A triangle cannot have sides of zero or less length."
     end
  }

  if [a,b,c].uniq.count == 1
    return :equilateral
  elsif [a,b,c].uniq.count == 2
    return :isosceles
  elsif [a,b,c].uniq.count == 3
    return :scalene
  end
end

Hopefully this helps other realize there is more than one way to skin a cat.

2
  • 1
    Nice functional approach to classification. Could use a case statement instead of if/elsif chain at the end to avoid repeating calls to uniq and count. Jun 24, 2012 at 1:37
  • 1
    'return' isn't necessary at the end
    – Evmorov
    Jul 31, 2014 at 4:56
4

After try to understand what I must to do with koan 151, I got it with the first posts, and get lot fun to check everyone solution :) ... here is the mine:

def triangle(a, b, c)
  array = [a, b, c].sort
  raise TriangleError if array.min <= 0 || array[0]+array[1] <= array[2]
  array.uniq!
  array.length == 1 ? :equilateral: array.length == 2 ? :isosceles : :scalene
end

Koan is a very interesting way to learn Ruby

3

You definately do not update the TriangleError class - I am stuck on 152 myself. I think I need to use the pythag theorem here.

def triangle(a, b, c)
  # WRITE THIS CODE

  if a == 0 || b == 0 || c == 0
    raise TriangleError
  end

  # The sum of two sides should be less than the other side
  if((a+b < c) || (a+c < b) || (b+c < a))
    raise TriangleError
  end
  if a==b && b==c
    return :equilateral
  end
  if (a==b && a!=c) || (a==c && a!=b) || (b==c && b!=a)
    return :isosceles
  end
  if(a!=b && a!=c && b!=c)
    return :scalene
  end


end

# Error class used in part 2.  No need to change this code.
class TriangleError < StandardError
end
2
  • 2
    What you've done is fine, but it's not the Pythagorean theorem ;) Pythagorean theorem states c^2 = a^2 + b^2 and is only valid for right-angled triangles. May 8, 2011 at 6:00
  • 2
    If you start by doing a, b, c = [a, b, c].sort you'll find the rest of your code becomes much simpler. ;) Oct 16, 2011 at 22:44
3

In fact in the following code the condition a <= 0 is redundant. a + b will always be less than c if a < 0 and we know that b < c

    raise TriangleError if a <= 0 || a + b <= c
3

I don't think I see this one here, yet.

I believe all the illegal triangle conditions imply that the longest side can't be more than half the total. i.e:

def triangle(a, b, c)

  fail TriangleError, "Illegal triangle: [#{a}, #{b}, #{c}]" if
    [a, b, c].max >= (a + b + c) / 2.0

  return :equilateral if a == b and b == c
  return :isosceles if a == b or b == c or a == c
  return :scalene

end
0
2

This one did take some brain time. But here's my solution

def triangle(a, b, c)
  # WRITE THIS CODE
  raise TriangleError, "All sides must be positive number" if a <= 0 || b <= 0 || c <= 0
  raise TriangleError, "Impossible triangle" if ( a + b + c - ( 2 *  [a,b,c].max ) <= 0  )

  if(a == b && a == c)
      :equilateral
  elsif (a == b || b == c || a == c)
      :isosceles
  else
    :scalene
  end
end
2

I ended up with this code:

def triangle(a, b, c)
    raise TriangleError, "impossible triangle" if [a,b,c].min <= 0
    x, y, z = [a,b,c].sort
    raise TriangleError, "no two sides can be < than the third" if x + y <= z

    if a == b && b == c # && a == c # XXX: last check implied by previous 2
        :equilateral
    elsif a == b || b == c || c == a
        :isosceles
    else
        :scalene
    end
end 

I don't like the second condition/raise, but I'm unsure how to improve it further.

2

You could also try to instance the exception with:

raise TriangleError.new("All sides must be greater than 0") if a * b * c <= 0
1
  • 1
    This doesn't work, two negative sides will pass this test.
    – Tom Busby
    Aug 29, 2018 at 13:50
1

Here is what I wrote and it all worked fine.

def triangle(a, b, c)
  # WRITE THIS CODE
  raise TriangleError, "Sides have to be greater than zero" if (a == 0) | (b == 0) | (c == 0)
  raise TriangleError, "Sides have to be a postive number" if (a < 0) | (b < 0) | (c < 0)
  raise TriangleError, "Two sides can never be less than the sum of one side" if ((a + b) < c) | ((a + c) < b) | ((b + c) < a)
  raise TriangleError, "Two sides can never be equal one side" if ((a + b) ==  c) | ((a + c) ==  b) | ((b + c) ==  a)
  return :equilateral if (a == b) & (a == c) & (b == c)
  return :isosceles if (a == b) | (a == c) | (b == c)
  return :scalene

end

# Error class used in part 2.  No need to change this code.
class TriangleError < StandardError
end
2
  • Any reason to do four tests when you can do this: ` raise TriangleError, "Sides must by numbers greater than zero" if (a <= 0) || (b <= 0) || (c <= 0) raise TriangleError, "No two sides can add to be less than or equal to the other side" if (a+b <= c) || (a+c <= b) || (b+c <= a) ` Apr 2, 2011 at 14:44
  • 3
    Why are you using a single pipe (|)? Aug 12, 2011 at 3:38
1

You have to check that the new created triangle don't break the "Triangle inequality". You can ensure this by this little formula.

if !((a-b).abs < c && c < a + b)
  raise TriangleError
end

When you get the Error:

<TriangleError> exception expected but none was thrown.

Your code is probably throwing an exception while creating a regular triangle in this file. about_triangle_project.rb

1
  • You'd need to make sure a, b, and c are in a certain order, lest your test only cover 1/3 of the possible cases.
    – cHao
    Jul 10, 2011 at 3:49
1

For the Koan about_triangle_project_2.rb there's no need to change TriangleError class. Insert this code before your triangle algorithm to pass all tests:

if ((a<=0 || b<=0 || c<=0))
    raise TriangleError
end

if ((a+b<=c) || (b+c<=a) || (a+c<=b))
    raise TriangleError
end
1

Here is my version... :-)

def triangle(a, b, c)

  if a <= 0 ||  b <= 0 || c <= 0
    raise TriangleError
  end 

  if a + b <= c  || a + c <= b ||  b + c <= a
    raise TriangleError
  end 

  return :equilateral if a == b && b == c
  return :isosceles   if a == b || a == c ||  b == c
  return :scalene     if a != b && a != c &&  b != c 

end
1

This is what I ended up with. It is sort of a combination of a few of the above examples with my own unique take on the triangle inequality exception (it considers the degenerate case as well). Seems to work.

def triangle(a, b, c)

  raise TriangleError if [a,b,c].min <= 0 
  raise TriangleError if [a,b,c].sort.reverse.reduce(:-) >= 0

  return :equilateral if a == b && b == c
  return :isosceles   if a == b || a == c ||  b == c
  return :scalene 

end
1

Here is my elegant answer, with a lot of help from the comments above

def triangle(a, b, c)

   test_tri = [a,b,c]

   if test_tri.min <=0
     raise TriangleError
   end

   test_tri.sort!

   if test_tri[0]+ test_tri[1] <= test_tri[2]
     raise TriangleError
   end

   if a == b and b == c
     :equilateral
   elsif a != b and b != c and a != c 
     :scalene   
   else
     :isosceles     
   end
end
1
  #(1)Any zero or -ve values
  if [a,b,c].any? { |side_length| side_length <= 0 }
    raise TriangleError
  end

  #(2)Any side of a triangle must be less than the sum of the other two sides
  # a <  b+c, b <  a+c  and c <  a+b  a  valid   triangle
  # a >= b+c, b >= a+c  and c >= a+b  an invalid triangle

  total_of_side_lengths = [a,b,c].inject {|total,x| total += x}

  if [a,b,c].any? { |side_length| side_length >= (total_of_side_lengths - side_length)}
    raise TriangleError
  end
1

Not that this question needed another answer; however, I think this is the simplest and most readable solution. Thanks to all those before me.

def triangle(a, b, c)
  a, b, c = [a, b, c].sort
  raise TriangleError, "all sides must > 0" unless [a, b, c].min > 0
  raise TriangleError, "2 smaller sides together must the > 3rd side" unless a + b > c
  return :equilateral if a == b && a == c
  return :isosceles if a == b || a == c || b == c
  return :scalene
end

# Error class used in part 2.  No need to change this code.
class TriangleError < StandardError
end
1
def triangle(a, b, c)

  sides = a, b, c # Assigns variable signs (array) to all arguments.
  begin

  raise TriangleError if sides.inject(:+) <= 0 # Raise an error if all sides added together are less than or equal to 0. (the triangle would be invalid).
  raise TriangleError if sides.any?(&:negative?) #Raise an error if there are any negative sides.
  sides.each {|side| (side < (sides.inject(:+) - side) ? nil : (raise TriangleError))} # For the final check, Raise an error if any single side is greater than the other two sides added together. It can be broken down like this if side is less than (remaining sides - side we're comparing) raise an error, else, nil. 

  return :equilateral if sides.uniq.length == 1
  return :isosceles   if sides.uniq.length == 2
  return :scalene     if sides.uniq.length == 3

  resuce TriangleError
  end
end
2
  • I second @morten.c 's comment. It will also be helpful if you have comments in the code.
    – David C.
    Mar 6, 2017 at 0:17
  • I added comments, let me know if it makes more sense!
    – Michael G
    Mar 6, 2017 at 19:39
1

your previous triangle method should appear here

class TriangleError < StandardError
end

def triangle(x,y,z)
  if(x>=y+z||y>=x+z||z>=x+y)
    raise TriangleError,"impossible triangle"
  elsif(x==0&&y==0&&z==0)||(x<0||y<0||z<0)
    raise TriangleError,"length cannot be zero or negative"
  elsif(x==y&&x==z)
    :equilateral
  elsif(x==y||y==z||x==z)
    :isosceles
  else
    :scalene
  end
end
1
  • hmm ... if this is an answer, please format the code to make it readable
    – kleopatra
    Jun 30, 2013 at 9:48
1

My solution, I think it's one of the more readable ones:

def triangle(a, b, c)
  a, b, c = [a, b, c].sort
  if a <= 0 or c >= a + b
    raise TriangleError
  end
  case [a, b, c].uniq.length
  when 1
    :equilateral
  when 2
    :isosceles
  when 3
    :scalene
  end
end
1

Leon wins on fancy elegance, Benji for his knowledge of the Array API. Here's my brute elegant answer:

def triangle(a, b, c)
   [a, b, c].each { | side | raise TriangleError, "Sides must be positive" unless side > 0 }
   raise TriangleError, "Two sides can never be less than or equal to third side" if ((a + b) <= c) | ((a + c) <= b) | ((b + c) <= a)

   return :equilateral if (a == b) && (b == c)
   return :isosceles if (a == b) || (b == c) || (a == c)
   return :scalene
end
0

No Need to change the TriangleError code for either challenge. You just need to check for invalid triangles and raise the error if the triangle isn't.

def triangle(a, b, c)
  if a==0 && b==0 && c==0
    raise TriangleError, "This isn't a triangle"
  end
  if a <0 or b < 0 or c <0
    raise TriangleError, "Negative length - thats not right"
  end
  if a + b <= c  or a + c <= b or  b + c <= a
    raise TriangleError, "One length can't be more (or the same as) than the other two added together.  If it was the same, the whole thing would be a line.  If more, it wouldn't reach. "
  end    
  # WRITE THIS CODE
  if a == b and b == c 
    return :equilateral    
  end      
  if (a==b or b == c or a == c) 
    return :isosceles
  end 
  :scalene      
end
0

There are some absolutely brilliant people on StackOverflow...I'm reminded of that every time I visit :D Just to contribute to the conversation, here's the solution I came up with:

def triangle(a, b, c)
    raise TriangleError if [a,b,c].min <= 0
    x,y,z = [a,b,c].sort
    raise TriangleError if x + y <= z

    equal_sides = 0
    equal_sides +=1 if a == b
    equal_sides +=1 if a == c
    equal_sides +=1 if b == c

    # Note that equal_sides will never be 2.  If it hits 2 
    # of the conditions, it will have to hit all 3 by the law
    # of associativity
    return [:scalene, :isosceles, nil, :equilateral][equal_sides] 
end 
0

Here's my solution... honestly I can't think of a more concise and readable one!

def triangle(a, b, c)
  raise TriangleError unless a > 0 && b > 0 && c > 0
  raise TriangleError if a == b && a + b <= c
  raise TriangleError if a == c && a + c <= b
  return :equilateral if a == b && b == c
  return :isosceles   if a == b || b == c || c == a
  :scalene
end
0

Rules:

  1. size must be > 0

  2. Total of any 2 sides, must be bigger that the 3rd

Code:

raise TriangleError if ( [a,b,c].any? {|x| (x <= 0)} ) or ( ((a+b)<=c) or ((b+c)<=a) or ((a+c)<=b))
[:equilateral, :isosceles, :scalene].fetch([a,b,c].uniq.size - 1)

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