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I have been programming in Swift for a couple months now. Recently, I have focused more on concepts of how Swift as a language works.


Hence, recently while reading apple documentation on Automatic Reference Counting(ARC), I came across the following lines:

This one on top:

In most cases, this means that memory management “just works” in Swift, and you do not need to think about memory management yourself. ARC automatically frees up the memory used by class instances when those instances are no longer needed.

And in the next paragraph, the following:

To make this possible, whenever you assign a class instance to a property, constant, or variable, that property, constant, or variable makes a strong reference to the instance. The reference is called a “strong“ reference because it keeps a firm hold on that instance, and does not allow it to be deallocated for as long as that strong reference remains.


I am a little confused as to what is the dynamics of the situation. I have noted while using storyboards, that you set reference to weak, hence the class looks like this, also what I would call case 1:

Case 1

class SomeClass : UIViewController {
    @IBOutlet weak var nameLabel : UILabel!

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        nameLabel.text = "something."  
    }  
}

Here, the label has one-to-one weak reference with the ViewController, and as soon as the Controller is changed, reference is broken (memory dealloc) since it is weak. Hence, no issues related to the memory.

Pardon me if the above statement is wrong or loosely held. I would be glad if someone confirms my assumption or counters it.


My question is about the second case however, where I do not use storyboards and class looks like below:

Case 2

class SomeClass : UIViewController {
    var nameLabel : UILabel = {

      let label = UILabel()
      label.translatesAutoresizingMaskIntoConstraints = false
      return label

    }()

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        view.addSubView(nameLabel)
        // view.addConstraints...
    }  
}

For the above case, My assumption is that the ViewController has one-on-one strong reference with the label, and the view inside ViewController also has strong reference with the label.. If the class is changed/ label is removed from subview.. then I think the memory would not be deallocated. Or at least the view controller will maintain a strong reference to the label (as per the docs.)

I confirmed this by removing label from view's subviews and printing out the label (It gave me an instance of UILabel with frame that was at 0 origin and 0 size.) hence an instance that isn't nil.

The only thing I could gather from this was that although the label was removed from UIView, it still maintained a strong reference with the controller, hence permanent state in memory. Am I right?

If this is the case. How should I prevent my code from having such memory issues? The bigger problem is that if I declare my variable like so, I get a nil while adding it as a subview of main view in controller.

    weak var nameLabel : UILabel = {

      let label = UILabel()
      label.translatesAutoresizingMaskIntoConstraints = false
      return label

    }()

If declaring variables like in the second case can cause permanent strong references how should I declare them instead to not have memory issues?


So to conclude, my question is:

In cases where no storyboard outlets are used, and variables are strongly referenced to the view controller, will these references cause memory issues?

If so, what code declaration practice must I follow?

If not so, please provide thoughtful arguments with valid explanations to counter it.


Again, pardon me if I am incorrect anywhere.

Thank you in advance.

3
  • 1
    Best practice questions are generally not a good fit for Stack Overflow because answers can only be based on opinion, not fact.
    – JAL
    Commented Jul 15, 2016 at 13:40
  • @JAL This question is specific and asks for the best possible solution to the problem above, This question does not demand from an answerer to provide the best solutions out of a few alternatives. I have edited the title however. Commented Jul 15, 2016 at 13:49
  • Using strong references to IBOutlets means that the outlets will still be retained if they're removed from the superview. Whether this is an issue depends on the requirements of the application. If you have some view which you remove from the hierarchy and you need to retain a reference to reuse it later, then it should be a strong reference. If on the other hand you want the views to be deallocated when they are removed from the view, then the reference should be weak. This is exactly the same as any other variable. Commented Jul 20, 2016 at 0:01

6 Answers 6

13
+50

The only thing I could gather from this was that although the label was removed from UIView, it still maintained a strong reference with the controller, hence permanent state in memory. Am I right?

No. There's no big issue here.

The label has no strong reference to the view controller — if it did, that would be a retain cycle and would cause both the label and the view controller to leak. For this very reason, a view should never keep a strong reference to its view controller.

Here, however, it's the other way around: the view controller has a strong reference to the label. That's fine. It's true that the label therefore stays in existence after it has been removed from its superview. But that might not be bad. In many cases, it's good! For example, suppose you intend to put the label back into the interface later; you will need to have retained it.

If you are sure you won't need to keep the label around later, then simply use an Optional wrapping a UILabel as your instance property. That way, you can assign nil to the label instance property when you're done with it, and the label will go out of existence.

But in any case there is no leak here and you should just stop worrying. When the view controller goes out of existence, the label will go out of existence too. The label lived longer than it had to, but that's tiny and unimportant on the grand scale of things.

5
  • I have upvoted. Thanks for you answer! Would be great if you can provide me some readings or sources. Thanks! I will most likely accept this, but feel free to add more details or information. Commented Jul 15, 2016 at 18:20
  • 2
    I've simply recited some facts. It's not like there's any room for doubt or debate. If you're having trouble grasping how memory management works, you might read the memory management section of my book: apeth.com/iOSBook/ch12.html#_memory_management The free online version of the chapter is about Objective-C, but the underlying facts are the same as for Swift. And in fact I go into more detail about what ARC does in this version of the chapter than in modern editions of the book, because, as you cited earlier, ARC "just works" so it isn't necessary to worry about those details.
    – matt
    Commented Jul 15, 2016 at 18:52
  • I agree. This situation doesn't qualify as a memory leak since there is no retain cycle created. The UILabel remains in memory because the controller is holding a strong reference to it unless you either set a different label to the property or nil it out (which would require declaring it as an optional) Commented Jul 21, 2016 at 6:26
  • Also, oh hai Matt Neuburg! I love your books. Your objc fundamentals helped me get started in iOS :) Commented Jul 21, 2016 at 6:29
  • @matt Thank you so much. I did some studying myself based on what you said and it helped me learn many new fundamentals. Commented Jul 22, 2016 at 8:45
1

create the label when you need ,then call addsubView to make an strong reference to it and make an weak reference to your member var like this:

class ViewController: UIViewController {

weak var label : UILabel?

override func viewDidLoad() {
    super.viewDidLoad()

    let label = UILabel()
    view.addSubview(label)
    self.label = label

}

override func touchesBegan(touches: Set<UITouch>, withEvent event: UIEvent?) {

    print(label)
    //click first Optional(<UILabel: 0x7fb562c3f260; frame = (0 0; 0 0); userInteractionEnabled = NO; layer = <_UILabelLayer: 0x7fb562c11c70>>)
    //click second nil
    label?.removeFromSuperview()
}
}

anyway while the viewcontroller release ,the label will be release and view.subview will be release too.

Demo

i wrote an easy demo make the ViewControllerTest to be the rootviewcontroller

class Test{

weak var label:UILabel?

static let instance = Test()


}



class ViewControllerTest: UIViewController {

override func viewDidLoad() {
    super.viewDidLoad()

    let item = UIBarButtonItem(title: "Test", style: .Plain, target: self, action: #selector(self.test))
    self.navigationItem.rightBarButtonItem = item

}

func test(){
    print(Test.instance.label)
}

override func touchesBegan(touches: Set<UITouch>, withEvent event: UIEvent?) {


    let vc = ViewController()
    self.navigationController?.pushViewController(vc, animated: true)
    print(vc.nameLabel)
    let test = Test.instance
    test.label = vc.nameLabel

}

}



class ViewController: UIViewController {

var nameLabel : UILabel = {

    let label = UILabel()
    label.translatesAutoresizingMaskIntoConstraints = false
    return label

}()

override func viewDidLoad() {
    super.viewDidLoad()
    view.backgroundColor = UIColor.whiteColor()
    view.addSubview(nameLabel)

    let item = UIBarButtonItem(title: "Test", style: .Plain, target: self, action: #selector(self.test))
    self.navigationItem.rightBarButtonItem = item

}

func test(){
    print(Test.instance.label)
}
}
4
  • Hey, this seems like a clever workaround. But are you indicating that i will have to re-declare every single variable that I referenced in View Controller? Is it a common practice in coding? I am looking for best industry practice. Commented Jul 13, 2016 at 9:06
  • @AkshanshThakur yes it is. but in your way won't cause memory issues because all two strong references break while viewcontroller release .
    – Wilson XJ
    Commented Jul 13, 2016 at 9:11
  • Okay. Is there a way you can confirm this? Any relevant source or related articles. I am sure that view will be released when view controller is released. But will that also release the label from the view? Commented Jul 13, 2016 at 9:13
  • @AkshanshThakur have a try with the demo
    – Wilson XJ
    Commented Jul 13, 2016 at 9:37
1

I don't think strongly referenced variables to view controller cause any memory issues.

Normally views are deallocated before deallocating their view controller. For example, in in your code, when deallocating the view, ARC decreases the counter pointing to namelabel, so it passes from 2 to 1. Then, when deallocating the view controller it decreases the counter again, from 1 to 0. Once there are 0 references pointing to namelabel its removed.

1

A weak reference is a reference that does not keep a strong hold on the instance it refers to, and so does not stop ARC from disposing of the referenced instance. This behavior prevents the reference from becoming part of a strong reference cycle. You indicate a weak reference by placing the weak keyword before a property or variable declaration

> Weak references must be declared as variables, to indicate that their value can change at runtime. A weak reference cannot be declared as a constant.

Because a weak reference does not keep a strong hold on the instance it refers to, it is possible for that instance to be deallocated while the weak reference is still referring to it. Therefore, ARC automatically sets a weak reference to nil when the instance that it refers to is deallocated. Because weak references need to allow nil as their value, they always have an optional type. You can check for the existence of a value in the weak reference, just like any other optional value, and you will never end up with a reference to an invalid instance that no longer exists

Source: Apple docs

A weak reference is just a pointer to an object that doesn't protect the object from being deallocated by ARC. While strong references increase the retain count of an object by 1, weak references do not. In addition, weak references zero out the pointer to your object when it successfully deallocates. This ensures that when you access a weak reference, it will either be a valid object, or nil.

Hope can help you to understand better a weak reference, be it related to a storyboard item or created programmatically.

1

I always explain it to my students like this.

With a strong reference, you can see a value, and you have a lasso around it. You have a say in whether the value remains alive.

With a weak reference, you can see it, but there's no lasso. You have no say in whether the value lives or not.

1

For your situation to avoid occurrence of Memory leak for a second. You can go with Matt answer.

For better understanding, create a custom UILabel class under MRC flag in build phases->Complie sources.

In custom class, override retain and release method. Put breakpoints on them.

Use that custom UILabel class in your view controller with ARC flag ON. Go with matt answer or use below optional declaration of UILabel.

import UIKit

class ViewController: UIViewController {
    var label:UILabel? = {
        let label = UILabel()
        label.translatesAutoresizingMaskIntoConstraints = false
        label.text = "something"
        return label
    }()

    override func viewDidLoad() {
        super.viewDidLoad()
        self.view.addSubview(self.label!)
        //namelabel goes out of scope when method exists.
        //self.view has 1+ ref of self.label
    }
    override func viewDidAppear(animated: Bool) {
        super.viewDidAppear(animated)
        self.label?.removeFromSuperview()//-1 ref of self.label
        self.label = nil
        print(self.label)
    }

    override func didReceiveMemoryWarning() {
        super.didReceiveMemoryWarning()
        // Dispose of any resources that can be recreated.
    }
}

You will have clear picture of how ARC works and why weak ref of UILabel causes crash while adding to UIView.

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