1

i'm new to MySQL and I have read many post talking transactions and table locking that i found here and over the net, so i think my question should not be redundant.

I'm trying to optimise queries, mostly for User Registration and Sessions. The Web Application is written in PHP/MySQL(i) and I'm using InnoDB engine.

I do not use $_SESSIONS to store users sessions but I use a table on DB in which I store some information about the user session that is kept alive with cookies. This method require me to check the user-session on DB for each user page request. Doing that I also join the 'users' table in the select session query to take fresh user information each time.

On user registration queries i am not sure what method is better for: Performance, Code quality and Security to avoid problems when more than a user try to register the same username/email at the same time.

users table:

user_id (primary, AI)
username (unique)
email (unique)
password
field 1
field 2
...

If query fails because the username or email is already taken i need to know which one is already taken.

METHOD A: LOCK users TABLE

LOCK TABLES users WRITE;
// users provided username and email are already taken?
SELECT COUNT(username) username, (SELECT COUNT(email) FROM users WHERE email = 'batman@heroes.com') email FROM users WHERE username = 'batman'

$res = fetch_array; 
if($res['username'] == 0 && $res['email'] == 0){
   INSERT INTO users (username,email,password) VALUES ('batman','batman@heroes.com','imtheonlytruehero')

   if(affected_rows == 1)
      $username = null;
      $email= null;
      $registration = true;
   }
   else {
      $username = null;
      $email= null;
      $registration = false;
   }
}
else {
   $username = ($res['username'] > 0) ? false : true;
   $email = ($res['email'] > 0) ? false : true;
   $registration = false;
}    
UNLOCK TABLES;

METHOD B: TRANSACTION with INSERT+UPDATE

START TRANSACTION;
INSERT INTO users (username,email,password) VALUES ('batman','0','imtheonlytruehero');

if(affected_rows > 0) {
   $username = true;
   UPDATE users SET email='batman@heroes.com' WHERE username='batman';
   if(affected_rows > 0) {
      $email = true;
      $registration = true;
      COMMIT;
   }
   else {
      $email = false;
      $registration = true;
      ROLLBACK;
   }
}
else {
   $username = false;
   $email = null;
   $registration = false;
   ROLLBACK;
}

My concern using method A is: what happens to other logged users (assuming they are a lot) when trying to get their sessions verified to navigate (remember 'session check' also join users table) when a new user is registering and his query is locking the users table? Slowness? Timeouts? Or are the queries (select and insert) light enough to not compromise performance?

Does method B have high chances to generate deadlocks?

What can i do? Pick one of this method? Mix they? Trashing everything and start over?

I appreciate any help. Thank You.

  • What you should really do is just put a unique index on the username and emails. Then you can't have duplicates at all and the database handles that for you. Transactions won't block duplicate values and locking would probably work, but could cause issues with nothing being able to be done while the table is locked which is bad for performance. A unique index would prevent duplicate rows and can be caught as an exception. – Jonathan Kuhn Jul 13 '16 at 17:18
  • Thanks for your answer. I already provided to set Unique index on username and email columns as mentioned at the beginning of the post. My doubt however is if i just do the insert and an user use both username and email already set on the table i can't tell him if both are taken because mysql error report only the first duplicate key occurred, so in this case i can't know if also the email is already used, causing make the user try another insert to know that also the email is taken. Do you know any method to face this "problem"? Thank you very much! – cicciopast Jul 14 '16 at 10:07
  • query to see if either already exist in the database first. then you can tell them they are in use. the unique index is just there to make sure there are no duplicates. nothing else. you should be checking beforehand to make it more user friendly and not relying on the database index to catch the errors. they are a safety net. – Jonathan Kuhn Jul 14 '16 at 16:34
0

Locking an entire table should only be used in exceptional cases, METHOD A would hamper concurrency. Assuming that you have unique indexes on both username and email METHOD B could be rewritten to the example provided below.

This approach should work in both READ COMMITTED and REPEATABLE READ isolation modes, in mysql and postgresql (pseudocode):

while (1) {
    START TRANSACTION;
    SELECT * FROM users WHERE username = ? OR email = ?;

    if (something_found) {
        // figure out what was found — email, login or both
        // ...
    } else {
        try {
            INSERT INTO users …;
        } catch (UniqueViolation) {
            // somebody else could have inserted a record with the same
            // username/email after our SELECT query
            ROLLBACK;
            // try again
            continue;
        }           
    }
    COMMIT;
    break;
}
0

Locking tables should be avoided if possible. For method A there is no reason to lock anything or to use transactions.

This is how you would handle method A (note that if you insert user data, you should use prepared statements)

$result =  $db->query('SELECT COUNT(id) as total FROM USER WHERE username = "batman" or email = "batman@heroes.com"');
$row = $result->fetch_assoc();
if($row['total'] > 0}{
  // redirect back to form, exit here
}

try{
  // no user with email, username exists, so try to insert that user
  $db->query('INSERT INTO USER ...');
  $registration = true;
}
catch(Exception e){
   // If a different user with same username or email registered in 
   // the mean time then redirect to form. 
}

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