5

I think it's best to illustrate what I'm trying to achieve with a concrete example:

Let's say I'm making a cocoapod. I have a table view inside the example project, and I want the tableview's delegate methods for its scrolling to be called inside my cocoapod. I know how to pass the tableView into my cocoapod module, but I'm not sure how I can listen to delegate methods inside it, since I want my ViewController in the example app to also be a delegate.

End result is, I want to show a simple view going up and down with the scrollbar on the tableView when it scrolls.

First of all, which scrollview delegate methods should I use so I can update the y position of my custom view at all times to match the center of the scrollbar's y position?

Second of all, how can I listen to them (scrollview/tableview delegate methods) inside my cocoapod module?

Note: I'm using Swift 2.2

Edit: Here's the end product, thanks to your guys' help, in case anyone's interested: https://github.com/xtrinch/MRTableViewCellCountScrollIndicator

  • If you just need to listen to the scrollViewDidScroll delegate method, you could instead rely on observing the UIScrollView.contentOffset property through KVO – Alessandro Orrù Jul 13 '16 at 17:29
  • Swift2 tag is only aimed for migration problems. This doesn't seem to be the case, so just swift tag should be OK. – Vladimir Nul Jul 13 '16 at 17:29
  • Please post code illustrating what you want to do. – Feldur Jul 13 '16 at 17:31
  • @AlessandroOrrù that sounds very promising, and if I wanted to show my view only when the user is actually scrolling and hide it like the usual scrollbar does when the user isn't scrolling? – xtrinch Jul 13 '16 at 17:39
0

You can achieve both goals by using Key-Value Observing (KVO), to monitor the contentOffset and the contentSize of the scroll view independently of the table view delegate.

The contentOffset is the amount that the scrollView has scrolled. The y value is the amount scrolled in the vertical direction.

The contentSize is the total height of all of the table rows.

KVO lets you write code which gets called whenever a property on another object changes. You can use KVO to monitor changes to contentSize and contentOffset, and update the custom view when those values change.

Here is how you might implement it in your CocoaPod:

private var ContentOffsetKVO = 0
private var ContentSizeKVO = 0

public class ScrollController: NSObject {

    public var customView: UIView? {
        didSet {
            updateScrollPosition()
        }
    }

    public var scrollView: UIScrollView? {
        didSet {
            if let view = oldValue {
                removeKVO(view)
            }

            if let view = scrollView {
                addKVO(view)
                updateScrollPosition()
            }
        }
    }

    deinit {
        if let scrollView = scrollView {
            removeKVO(scrollView)
        }
    }

    private func removeKVO(scrollView: UIScrollView) {

        scrollView.removeObserver(
            self,
            forKeyPath: "contentSize",
            context: &ContentSizeKVO
        )

        scrollView.removeObserver(
            self,
            forKeyPath: "contentOffset",
            context: &ContentOffsetKVO
        )
    }

    private func addKVO(scrollView: UIScrollView) {

        scrollView.addObserver(
            self,
            forKeyPath: "contentSize",
            options: [.Initial, .New],
            context: &ContentSizeKVO
        )

        scrollView.addObserver(
            self,
            forKeyPath: "contentOffset",
            options: [.Initial, .New],
            context: &ContentOffsetKVO
        )
    }

    public override func observeValueForKeyPath(keyPath: String?, ofObject object: AnyObject?, change: [String : AnyObject]?, context: UnsafeMutablePointer<Void>) {

        switch keyPath {

        case .Some("contentSize"), .Some("contentOffset"):
            self.updateScrollPosition()

        default:
            super.observeValueForKeyPath(keyPath, ofObject: object, change: change, context: context)
        }

    }

    private func updateScrollPosition() {

        guard let scrollView = scrollView, let customView = customView else {
            return
        }

        // Update with the new scroll position.

        let viewSize = scrollView.bounds.size.height
        let scrollLimit = scrollView.contentSize.height - viewSize
        let scrollOffset = scrollView.contentOffset.y
        let scrollDelta = scrollOffset / scrollLimit

        let trackerFrame = customView.frame
        let trackerTravel = viewSize - trackerFrame.size.height
        let trackerOffset = scrollOffset + (trackerTravel * scrollDelta)

        customView.frame = CGRect(
            origin: CGPoint(
                x: 0,
                y: trackerOffset
            ),
            size: trackerFrame.size
        )

    }
}

To use this:

let scrollController = ScrollController()

override func viewDidLoad() {
    super.viewDidLoad()

    // UITableView is a sub-class of UIScrollView so we can assign it directly.
    scrollController.scrollView = tableView

    let customView = UIView(
        frame: CGRect(
            origin: CGPointZero,
            size: CGSize(
                width: 44,
                height: 44
            )
        )
    )
    customView.backgroundColor = UIColor.magentaColor()
    tableView.addSubview(customView)

    scrollController.customView = customView
}
  • I get an error at this line: case (.Some("contentOffset"), let scrollView as? UIScrollView): "Invalid pattern" – xtrinch Jul 13 '16 at 18:43
  • Otherwise it's perfect! Just what I've been looking for. Thank you very much – xtrinch Jul 13 '16 at 18:52
  • 1
    I fixed the error, and updated the example to show how you could position the custom view, by also observing the contentOffset. – Luke Van In Jul 13 '16 at 18:56
  • I made some corrections to the examples, to run a bit smoother, and to fix a bug in the use case. – Luke Van In Jul 13 '16 at 19:17
  • 1
    I saw that too after I posted the code the first time. I have updated the code since then to fine tune it. This particular issue was caused by the NSOperation call in observeValueForKeyPath. – Luke Van In Jul 13 '16 at 20:37

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