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I have repeat rows in a table with several dates:

 ID      STATE       DATE
----------------------------
id01   connected  2015-04-04
id01   connected  2015-04-05
id01   connected  2015-04-08
id01   disconect  2015-04-11
id01   disconect  2015-04-12
id01   connected  2015-04-13

I want a query with "start date" and "end date", with this result:

 ID      STATE    START DATE   END DATE
----------------------------------------
id01   connected  2015-04-04  2015-04-10
id01   disconect  2015-04-11  2015-04-12
id01   connected  2015-04-13  XXXXXXXXXX

The last "end date" it's not important (last value, null, now()...)

The most important is detect date of change (in this example no row for 2015-04-10, and the same state happends in 2015-04-13).

Posible solution? (not valid)

SELECT ID, STATE, MIN(date), MAX(date) 
   FROM TABLE
   GROUP BY ID, STATE;

Isn't valid because merge intervals:

 ID      STATE    START DATE   END DATE
----------------------------------------
id01   connected  2015-04-04  XXXXXXXXXX
id01   disconect  2015-04-11  2015-04-12

Query has run in Impala (similar SQL92)

1

Impala supports window functions. This problem is a "gap-and-islands" problem, so it can be solved using a difference of row numbers:

select id, state, min(date) as start_date, max(date) as end_date
from (select t.*,
             row_number() over (partition by id order by date) as seqnum_id,
             row_number() over (partition by id, state order by date) as seqnum_isd
      from table t
     ) t
group by id, state, (seqnum_id - seqnum_isd);

The logic for the difference is not difficult, but tricky when you first learn it. It helps to run the subquery and see what the row number values are -- and why the difference defines each group.

  • Amazing... simple and elegant... one problem for me: the first result, the end date with your query are 2015-04-08, not 2015-04-10. However, a very good solution, Thx – Kzas Jul 14 '16 at 6:00
  • Solution publish in the question. Thx Gordon – Kzas Jul 14 '16 at 7:42
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(Posted on behalf of the OP).

From Gordon Linoff's answer, translating "gap-and-islands" problem to my study case, there is the solution:

select 
    id,
    state,
    start_date,
    date_add(lag(start_date, 1) over (partition by id order by start_date desc), -1) as end_date
from 
    (select id, state, min(date) as start_date, max(date) as end_date
        from (select t.*,
                row_number() over (partition by id order by date) as seqnum_id,
                row_number() over (partition by id, state order by date) as seqnum_isd
            from test t
        ) t
    group by id, state, (seqnum_id - seqnum_isd)) t_range
order by start_date;

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