24

How do you select a field that contains only uppercase character in mysql or a field that doesn't contain any lower case character?

  • 2
    Are the fields allowed to contain non-letters? – martin clayton Oct 1 '10 at 6:01
24

You may want to use a case sensitive collation. I believe the default is case insensitive. Example:

CREATE TABLE my_table (
   id int,
   name varchar(50)
) CHARACTER SET latin1 COLLATE latin1_general_cs;

INSERT INTO my_table VALUES (1, 'SomeThing');
INSERT INTO my_table VALUES (2, 'something');
INSERT INTO my_table VALUES (3, 'SOMETHING');
INSERT INTO my_table VALUES (4, 'SOME4THING');

Then:

SELECT * FROM my_table WHERE name REGEXP '^[A-Z]+$';
+------+-----------+
| id   | name      |
+------+-----------+
|    3 | SOMETHING |
+------+-----------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

If you don't want to use a case sensitive collation for the whole table, you can also use the COLLATE clause as @kchau suggested in the other answer.

Let's try with a table using a case insensitive collation:

CREATE TABLE my_table (
   id int,
   name varchar(50)
) CHARACTER SET latin1 COLLATE latin1_general_ci;

INSERT INTO my_table VALUES (1, 'SomeThing');
INSERT INTO my_table VALUES (2, 'something');
INSERT INTO my_table VALUES (3, 'SOMETHING');
INSERT INTO my_table VALUES (4, 'SOME4THING');

This won't work very well:

SELECT * FROM my_table WHERE name REGEXP '^[A-Z]+$';
+------+-----------+
| id   | name      |
+------+-----------+
|    1 | SomeThing |
|    2 | something |
|    3 | SOMETHING |
+------+-----------+
3 rows in set (0.00 sec)

But we can use the COLLATE clause to collate the name field to a case sensitive collation:

SELECT * FROM my_table WHERE (name COLLATE latin1_general_cs) REGEXP '^[A-Z]+$';
+------+-----------+
| id   | name      |
+------+-----------+
|    3 | SOMETHING |
+------+-----------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)
| improve this answer | |
  • 9
    another way is to use BINARY compare BINARY city_name = BINARY upper(city_name) – Aivan Monceller Oct 4 '10 at 3:04
  • 1
    @AivanMonceller BINARY is the better answer in fact :) – northtree Nov 6 '15 at 9:28
11

This worked for me. It found all user emails with uppercase character:

SELECT * FROM users WHERE mail REGEXP BINARY '[A-Z]';
| improve this answer | |
6
SELECT * FROM table1 WHERE (columnname COLLATE latin1_bin )=UPPER(depart);
| improve this answer | |
  • That will also select fields that contain numbers and other characters. I don't think the OP wants that. – Daniel Vassallo Oct 1 '10 at 6:11
2

By using REGEXP : http://www.tech-recipes.com/rx/484/use-regular-expressions-in-mysql-select-statements/

Use [:upper:] for uppercase letters.

SELECT * FROM table WHERE field REGEXP '^[[:upper:]+]$'
| improve this answer | |
  • using [:upper:] would also select 'Example' .. [^a-z] doesn't seem to work fine – Aivan Monceller Oct 1 '10 at 5:58
2

Try this -

SELECT * FROM <mytable> WHERE UPPER(<columnname>) = <columnname>
| improve this answer | |
  • That will not work with a case insensitive collation. In addition, that will also select fields that contain numbers and other characters. I don't think the OP wants that. – Daniel Vassallo Oct 1 '10 at 6:12
  • 1
    @Daniel - Yes, I agree this does not handle special characters. But the question is not clear about he wants or does not want to retain special characters. – Sachin Shanbhag Oct 1 '10 at 6:15
1
SELECT column_name FROM table WHERE column_name REGEXP BINARY '^[A-Z]+$'
| improve this answer | |
  • This is the simplest, clearest and most succinct answer posted here. – Giacomo1968 May 23 '19 at 16:18
1

Basic eg.

SELECT * FROM foo WHERE bar REGEXP '[A-Z]';
| improve this answer | |
  • not working thanks SELECT 'as' REGEXP '[A-Z]' returns 1 SELECT 'AS' REGEXP '[A-Z]' returns 1 – Aivan Monceller Oct 1 '10 at 5:55
  • Can your field contain other characters, such as spaces, etc? If so, you would want to include those in the regular expression pattern as well. – kafuchau Oct 1 '10 at 5:57
1

Found this in the comments - it deserves a post of its own:

SELECT * FROM mytable WHERE BINARY mycolumn = BINARY UPPER(mycolumn);

The problem with WHERE UPPER(mycolumn) = mycolumn is the collation, and it depends on your table what you can use there.

| improve this answer | |

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